Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

IPS Panel Questions

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
Share
January 6, 2011 4:44:26 PM

Hey TH,

I was wondering if any one could explain a few things to me. I am building a new system specifically for photography but also has some gaming and multi tasking capabilities. I am planning on going with the need intel chip set from sandybridges (i5 2000k) and probably nvidia for graphics the gtx series (460 or 470).

So the questions. I dont have the cash currently to go out and buy a dell 27" ips panel (college tuition is a bugger). So I have been looking at other options. Viewsonic has a new 23" ips panel for around 300 that seems pretty nice and if I get 2 down the road it will suffice until I can put out the cash to get a true Dell IPS pannel.

My question is that most IPS pannels dont have HDMI ports on the back. Is there a reason for this or is it just an extra cost they dont want to add? Also can I hook up other devices to my monitor through my graphics card. For instance a PS3 HDMI cable to the graphics card and then to the monitor through DVI? Also these are HD pannels with proper resolution for 1080p, can I expect to get the same quality on them as I would on an LCD or even LED monitor? Sorry if these are stupid questions i am just trying to make an informed decision.

Thanks for the helps guys :D 

More about : ips panel questions

January 7, 2011 1:53:45 AM

The IPS monitors you are looking at are the lower end ones using an e-IPS panel (which costs less than S-IPS / H-IPS to manufacture) are priced to compete with TN panels. One way to keep the price down is to exclude the HDMI port.

1920 x 1080 = 1080p

I suppose if you want to hook up a PS3 to DVI port in a monitor you can use a HDMI-to-DVI adapter, but DVI does not carry audio signals.
January 7, 2011 2:26:23 AM

jaguarskx said:
The IPS monitors you are looking at are the lower end ones using an e-IPS panel (which costs less than S-IPS / H-IPS to manufacture) are priced to compete with TN panels. One way to keep the price down is to exclude the HDMI port.

1920 x 1080 = 1080p

I suppose if you want to hook up a PS3 to DVI port in a monitor you can use a HDMI-to-DVI adapter, but DVI does not carry audio signals.


I understand if they are lower quality but will they be decent enough to do most photography business on? I know they wont be true studio quality like pro photographers use but will they be decent enough for most professional entry level photographers?

This is the monitor I have been looking at
http://www.amazon.com/ViewSonic-VP2365WB-23-Inch-IPS-Mo...

Also when I asked about the resolution being 1080p I ment will it display HDM video as well as an LCD or LED panel even though its going though VGA instead of HDMI?

Also whats the difference between VGA and DVI?
Related resources
January 7, 2011 4:08:53 AM

First, definitely don't use VGA. It's analog, and lower quality. DVI is definitely the way to go. You should be able to display HD video just fine through a DVI connection, even if it has HDCP.

(Oh, and you keep asking whether it will work as well as an LCD or LED panel? IPS panels are LCD panels. So are so-called LED monitors, they just use LEDs to backlight the LCD)
January 7, 2011 4:32:46 AM

The physical HDMI port cost next to nothing to manufacture. It is the royalty fee that gets them. HDMI is a quick way to increase a monitor's price by $20.

DVI is just as good and you can get a DVI to HDMI cable if you want xbox connectivity.

Most should support DisplayPort which has higher bandwidth than HDMI and royalty free.

Technically at low resolution like 1080P, even VGA cables can carry that resolution but analog signals should be avoided when possible. In terms of quality, it doesn't really matter between DVI, HDMI or DP.

And yes there is no such things as a LED panel, theres only LCD panels and OLED panels. The LED part of the monitor is not the color filter part, but just the backlight. White LED provides no benefits other than low power and thinner.

Best solution

January 7, 2011 4:50:49 AM
Share

All consumer level "LED" monitors use TN panels.

If you want a non professional IPS panel then yer "stuck" with traditional CCFL. If you want an IPS monitor with LED backlight, then you only need to increase your budget by 7x to 10x.

An e-IPS monitor is good enough for professional entry level photographers. I recommend the 23" Dell U2311h since it comes pre-calibrated. You can improve on the pre-calibration if you have a colorimeter on hand, but essentially it has pretty good color accuracy right out of the box; unlike most monitors.

Dell U2311 - $279 excluding shipping & taxes:
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c...

Review:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2311h.htm


Do not use VGA since it is analog, use DVI which is digital.
January 7, 2011 5:13:40 AM

I don't recommend the ViewSonic VP2365wb if you are going to play games on it. It lacks Response Time Compensation which means the rated response time is 14ms compared 8ms for the Dell U2311h I recommended. That means you are more likely to see ghosting effects. Otherwise it seems to be a good monitor; 2nd to the Dell.

The following review ViewSonic VP2365wb compares it to the Dell U2311h (and some other monitors):

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/viewsonic_vp2365wb....


Here's a table:


January 8, 2011 9:31:05 AM

Thanks for the info guys! That Viewsonic panel looks really affordable. Dell doesn't seem to be too well available for consumers in my country (see A LOT of them at the office though).

There's some info on the other competitors in my thread: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/59183-29-versus

I recall seeing one new low-end *IPS model with LED backlight. But white LEDs would mean decreased color gamut which is a bit bad for the typical applications of *IPS monitors.

Calibration I understand would be an important issue for professionals, because it can make a big difference on color accuracy on most monitors.
January 9, 2011 10:10:02 PM

Thanks every one this has been really good. I am leaning toward the Dell UltraSharp U2311H 23"W Monitor right now. Mainly because it has a 8 ms lag verse 14 ms on both e NEC model and Viewsonic models that fall in the similar price range.

Only thing I have left to do is to find a good calibrater to get my contrast, gamma, and colors up to par. Any one have any good options here?
January 10, 2011 10:51:26 PM

The default settings on the Dell U2311h is actually pretty good for something that rolls off the factory floor. My suggestion is to simply use it as is and then decide if you want a colorimeter for improvements.

Since you're in college I won't suggest a colorimeter that costs more than the monitor. So below $100 I would probably recommend the Spyder3 Express or the Pantone huey Pro MEU113. I think you can find them for less than $90 actually. If you want to spend a little more you can try the Spyder Pro for $140 or less.

Whichever colorimeter you decide may fit your needs, research first before buying.
January 10, 2011 11:09:31 PM

Best answer selected by preolt.
January 10, 2011 11:14:30 PM

Thanks so much for your help, I have already ordered The Dell ultrasharp. I am super stoked for a monitor that will actually have good color quality. Thanks TH
!