Windows XP Pro OEM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy an OEM
version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The thing is, I
not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and the OEM
one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any restrictions placed
on the OEM version? This would just be for a single PC.

Thanks.

Si


--
It denos't mtater waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, it's olny iprmoatnt
taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae.The rset can be a total
mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm.Tihs is bcuseae the huamn
mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
16 answers Last reply
More about windows
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    OEM stands for "Original Equipment Manufacture". I purchased a copy of XP
    Pro OEM...it is EXACTLY the same as the retail exept for the fact it does
    NOT come in a box NOR with the PRINTED user manual. ALSO, in regards to
    technical support...it is only provided via email on OEM software if at all.
    However, given the difference in price between Retail and OEM....it's well
    worth it when saving you hundreds of $$$.

    Jeff


    "Si" <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy an
    >OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The thing is,
    >I not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and the
    >OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any restrictions
    >placed on the OEM version? This would just be for a single PC.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Si
    >
    >
    > --
    > It denos't mtater waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, it's olny
    > iprmoatnt taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae.The rset
    > can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm.Tihs is
    > bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod
    > as a wlohe.
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    OEM versions of Windows XP:

    -- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.
    -- must be installed "clean" on a freshly reformatted drive or partition.
    -- cannot be transferred to a different computer in the future.
    -- the license cannot be sold or transferred to another user.
    -- are not eligible for free Microsoft technical support.
    -- any problems whatsoever with the installation CD or Product Key.
    is not eligible for Microsoft support....you have to deal with the "seller".
    -- cost less than "retail versions" due to the above limitations/risks.

    Best Advice: Purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP!

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User
    Microsoft Newsgroups

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "Si" wrote:

    | I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy an OEM
    | version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The thing is, I
    | not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and the OEM
    | one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any restrictions placed
    | on the OEM version? This would just be for a single PC.
    |
    | Thanks.
    |
    | Si
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk,
    Si <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> typed:

    > I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I
    > can buy
    > an OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as
    > well. The
    > thing is, I not sure what the difference is between the full
    > retail
    > version and the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences?
    > Are
    > there any restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would
    > just be
    > for a single PC.


    Although if you get a complete generic OEM version, it contains
    the same software, it has the following disadvantages as compared
    with the retail version:


    1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    installed on. It can never legally be moved to another computer,
    sold, or given away.


    2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.


    3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call
    them with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support
    from your OEM; that support may range anywhere between good and
    non-existent. Or you can get support elsewhere, such as in these
    newsgroups.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Si wrote:
    > I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy an OEM
    > version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The thing is, I
    > not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and the OEM
    > one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any restrictions placed
    > on the OEM version? This would just be for a single PC.
    >


    There are some very important reasons that an OEM license costs so
    much less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very limited:

    1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of non-peripheral
    hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC,
    although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP)
    and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which they are installed.
    An OEM license, once installed, is not legally transferable to another
    computer under any circumstances. This is the main reason some people
    avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies or is otherwise disposed of (even
    stolen), you cannot re-use your OEM license on a new PC. The only
    legitimate way to transfer the ownership of an OEM license is to
    transfer ownership of the entire PC.

    2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions. If you
    have any problems that require outside assistance, your only recourse is
    to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or the vendor of the OEM
    license. This would include such issues as lost a Product Key or
    replacing damaged installation media. (Microsoft does make allowances
    for those instances when you can prove that the OEM has gone out of
    business.) This doesn't mean that you can't download patches and
    service packs from Microsoft -- just no free telephone or email support
    for problems with the OS.

    3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier
    OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive.
    It can still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an
    in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.

    4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific manufacturer, such as
    eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely only install
    on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature. Further,
    such CDs are severely customized to contain only the minimum of device
    drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that the manufacturer feels
    necessary for the specific model of PC for which the CD was designed.
    (To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be available on the open market;
    but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap meets, or
    computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying until it's
    too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by Microsoft
    and sold to small systems builders, don't have this particular problem,
    though, and are pretty much the same as their retail counterparts, apart
    from the licensing, support, and upgrading restrictions.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk,
    Si <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> replied with a ;-)
    > I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy
    > an OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The
    > thing is, I not sure what the difference is between the full retail
    > version and the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are
    > there any restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would just be
    > for a single PC.
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Si

    OEM
    #17 on the FAQ list
    http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/xpfaq.html
    --
    Michael Stevens MS-MVP XP
    xpnews@bogusmichaelstevenstech.com
    http://www.michaelstevenstech.com
    For a better newsgroup experience. Setup a newsreader.
    http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/outlookexpressnewreader.htm
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
    news:%23HADF0ktFHA.3864@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > OEM versions of Windows XP:
    >
    > -- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.

    BFD

    > -- must be installed "clean" on a freshly reformatted drive or partition.

    BFD

    > -- cannot be transferred to a different computer in the future.

    Horsepucky.

    > -- the license cannot be sold or transferred to another user.

    Horsepucky.

    > -- are not eligible for free Microsoft technical support.

    Who cares?

    > -- any problems whatsoever with the installation CD or Product Key.
    > is not eligible for Microsoft support....you have to deal with the
    > "seller".

    Who cares?

    > -- cost less than "retail versions" due to the above limitations/risks.

    BFD.

    > Best Advice: Purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP!

    Bad advice but you're becoming famous for that, aren't you?

    > --
    > Carey Frisch
    > Microsoft MVP

    What a joke!

    > Windows XP - Shell/User

    Riiiiiiight.

    > Microsoft Newsgroups

    Alias
    >
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Si" wrote:
    >
    > | I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy an
    > OEM
    > | version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The thing is,
    > I
    > | not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and the
    > OEM
    > | one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any restrictions
    > placed
    > | on the OEM version? This would just be for a single PC.
    > |
    > | Thanks.
    > |
    > | Si
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:%23BV5O2ktFHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > In news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk,
    > Si <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> typed:
    >
    >> I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy
    >> an OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The
    >> thing is, I not sure what the difference is between the full retail
    >> version and the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are
    >> there any restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would just be
    >> for a single PC.
    >
    >
    > Although if you get a complete generic OEM version, it contains the same
    > software, it has the following disadvantages as compared with the retail
    > version:
    >
    >
    >
    > 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's installed
    > on. It can never legally be moved to another computer, sold, or given
    > away.

    Legally? MS took someone to court and establishe precedent? When?
    >
    >
    >
    > 2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.

    BFD
    >
    >
    >
    > 3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call them
    > with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support from your OEM;
    > that support may range anywhere between good and non-existent. Or you can
    > get support elsewhere, such as in these newsgroups.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User

    The newsgroup support is the best of those three options.

    Alias
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    What about when it comes to upgrading computer components? Would that cause
    any problems?

    Thanks to all for you help and advice.

    Cheers.

    Si


    --
    It denos't mtater waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, it's olny iprmoatnt
    taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae.The rset can be a total
    mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm.Tihs is bcuseae the huamn
    mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

    "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    news:eUIjEJmtFHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:%23BV5O2ktFHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk,
    >> Si <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> typed:
    >>
    >>> I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy
    >>> an OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The
    >>> thing is, I not sure what the difference is between the full retail
    >>> version and the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are
    >>> there any restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would just be
    >>> for a single PC.
    >>
    >>
    >> Although if you get a complete generic OEM version, it contains the same
    >> software, it has the following disadvantages as compared with the retail
    >> version:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's installed
    >> on. It can never legally be moved to another computer, sold, or given
    >> away.
    >
    > Legally? MS took someone to court and establishe precedent? When?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> 2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.
    >
    > BFD
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> 3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call them
    >> with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support from your OEM;
    >> that support may range anywhere between good and non-existent. Or you can
    >> get support elsewhere, such as in these newsgroups.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    >
    > The newsgroup support is the best of those three options.
    >
    > Alias
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Si wrote:
    > What about when it comes to upgrading computer components? Would that cause
    > any problems?
    >

    Only if you had a BIOS-locked OEM version and then subsequently tried
    to change the motherboard.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Not any more than a retail version would.

    Alias

    "Si" <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> wrote

    > What about when it comes to upgrading computer components? Would that
    > cause any problems?
    >
    > Thanks to all for you help and advice.
    >
    > Cheers.
    >
    > Si
    >
    >
    > --
    > It denos't mtater waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, it's olny
    > iprmoatnt taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae.The rset
    > can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm.Tihs is
    > bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod
    > as a wlohe.
    >
    > "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
    > news:eUIjEJmtFHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    >> news:%23BV5O2ktFHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >>> In news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk,
    >>> Si <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> typed:
    >>>
    >>>> I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy
    >>>> an OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The
    >>>> thing is, I not sure what the difference is between the full retail
    >>>> version and the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are
    >>>> there any restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would just be
    >>>> for a single PC.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Although if you get a complete generic OEM version, it contains the same
    >>> software, it has the following disadvantages as compared with the retail
    >>> version:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's installed
    >>> on. It can never legally be moved to another computer, sold, or given
    >>> away.
    >>
    >> Legally? MS took someone to court and establishe precedent? When?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> 2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.
    >>
    >> BFD
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> 3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call them
    >>> with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support from your
    >>> OEM; that support may range anywhere between good and non-existent. Or
    >>> you can get support elsewhere, such as in these newsgroups.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    >>
    >> The newsgroup support is the best of those three options.
    >>
    >> Alias
    >>
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Si wrote:
    > I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy an OEM
    > version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The thing is, I
    > not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and the OEM
    > one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any restrictions placed
    > on the OEM version? This would just be for a single PC.

    An OEM version comes w/ no MS support. (I'm assuming this is a full OEM
    version, nor a crippled Dell-specific version, for example)

    If you're halfway competent, go for the OEM version and save yourself a
    big chunk of money.
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:%23BV5O2ktFHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > In news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk,
    > Si <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> typed:
    >
    > > I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I
    > > can buy
    > > an OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as
    > > well. The
    > > thing is, I not sure what the difference is between the full
    > > retail
    > > version and the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences?
    > > Are
    > > there any restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would
    > > just be
    > > for a single PC.
    >
    >
    > Although if you get a complete generic OEM version, it contains
    > the same software, it has the following disadvantages as compared
    > with the retail version:
    >
    >
    >
    > 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    > installed on. It can never legally be moved to another computer,
    > sold, or given away.
    >

    Then how did I switch out a motherboard, and install the OS anew?

    And why did MS provide a new product key when my hardware was further
    modfied?

    >
    >
    > 2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.
    >

    Never tried it w/full install OEM CD. Why would I?

    >
    >
    > 3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call
    > them with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support
    > from your OEM; that support may range anywhere between good and
    > non-existent. Or you can get support elsewhere, such as in these
    > newsgroups.

    Says right on the license at startup I have 30 days free support. Should I
    write the reseller to tell MS to rewrite its license?

    Most of us, whether retail or OEM rely on neighbors, friends, acquaintances,
    web sites, and newsgroups for support. Tech support from big business is
    expensive, time consuming, and frustrating for both parties.

    >
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:eFIBkDutFHA.1136@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    Lil' Dave <spamyourself@virus.net> typed:

    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:%23BV5O2ktFHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk,
    >> Si <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> typed:
    >>
    >>> I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I
    >>> can buy
    >>> an OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as
    >>> well. The
    >>> thing is, I not sure what the difference is between the full
    >>> retail
    >>> version and the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences?
    >>> Are
    >>> there any restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would
    >>> just be
    >>> for a single PC.
    >>
    >>
    >> Although if you get a complete generic OEM version, it
    >> contains
    >> the same software, it has the following disadvantages as
    >> compared
    >> with the retail version:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    >> installed on. It can never legally be moved to another
    >> computer,
    >> sold, or given away.
    >>
    >
    > Then how did I switch out a motherboard, and install the OS
    > anew?


    It didn't say that it was technically impossible, nor did I say
    that switching a motherboard makes it a new computer. Although
    there are those here who claim that a new motherboard makes it a
    new computer, the EULA does *not* say that, and I maintain that
    it's a gray area that would only be settled in a court, if that
    ever happens.

    What I said was that the terms of the license prohibit your
    changing the computer it's installed on. Sometimes it's very
    clear that it's a new computer, other times it's much less clear.


    > And why did MS provide a new product key when my hardware was
    > further
    > modfied?


    Modifying hardware doesn't make it a new computer either. Also
    note that it wasn't *Microsoft* who provided the key, it was some
    individual employee at Microsoft. Not every Microsoft employee
    necessarily knows the rules equally well; and probably not every
    Microsoft employee enforces them equally well.


    >> 2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.
    >>
    >
    > Never tried it w/full install OEM CD. Why would I?


    I have no idea. Perhaps you wouldn't. But *many* people want to.


    >> 3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't
    >> call
    >> them with a problem, but instead have to get any needed
    >> support
    >> from your OEM; that support may range anywhere between good
    >> and
    >> non-existent. Or you can get support elsewhere, such as in
    >> these
    >> newsgroups.
    >
    > Says right on the license at startup I have 30 days free
    > support.
    > Should I write the reseller to tell MS to rewrite its license?
    >
    > Most of us, whether retail or OEM rely on neighbors, friends,
    > acquaintances, web sites, and newsgroups for support. Tech
    > support
    > from big business is expensive, time consuming, and frustrating
    > for
    > both parties.


    You want to argue with me, but I didn't say anything about how
    good Microsoft's technical support was, and I didn't suggest that
    it was better than, for example, the support here. In many cases,
    there can be support alternatives better than calling the vendor,
    regardless of who that vendor is. Si asked what the differences
    were between the Retail and OEM versions and what restrictions
    were on the OEM version. I answered his question accurately.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Bruce Chambers" <bchambers@cable0ne.n3t> wrote in message
    news:uxM7gTmtFHA.1028@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Si wrote:
    > > What about when it comes to upgrading computer components? Would that
    cause
    > > any problems?
    > >
    >
    > Only if you had a BIOS-locked OEM version and then subsequently tried
    > to change the motherboard.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Bruce Chambers
    >
    > Help us help you:
    > http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    >
    > You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    > both at once. - RAH

    "BIOS-locked OEM version" is provided by the PC manufacturer at time of
    sale, if they use that style. Not pertinent to this thread.
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    I concur with this, I never buy retail, it gets you nothing. Go for the
    OEM version every time..

    K

    "Jeffry Salvaggio" <someone@microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23tmCslktFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    : OEM stands for "Original Equipment Manufacture". I purchased a copy of
    XP
    : Pro OEM...it is EXACTLY the same as the retail exept for the fact it
    does
    : NOT come in a box NOR with the PRINTED user manual. ALSO, in regards
    to
    : technical support...it is only provided via email on OEM software if
    at all.
    : However, given the difference in price between Retail and OEM....it's
    well
    : worth it when saving you hundreds of $$$.
    :
    : Jeff
    :
    :
    : "Si" <si@munirs.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    : news:dfvfqo$ofh$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    : >I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy
    an
    : >OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The
    thing is,
    : >I not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and
    the
    : >OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any
    restrictions
    : >placed on the OEM version? This would just be for a single PC.
    : >
    : > Thanks.
    : >
    : > Si
    : >
    : >
    : > --
    : > It denos't mtater waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, it's olny
    : > iprmoatnt taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae.The
    rset
    : > can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm.Tihs
    is
    : > bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the
    wrod
    : > as a wlohe.
    : >
    : >
    :
    :
  16. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks to all for your help.

    Si


    --
    It denos't mtater waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, it's olny iprmoatnt
    taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae.The rset can be a total
    mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm.Tihs is bcuseae the huamn
    mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

    "Z" <Z@no.spam> wrote in message news:yrYUe.29377$ih4.18574@fe02.lga...
    > Si wrote:
    >> I want to get a copy of XP Pro for my nephew and found that I can buy an
    >> OEM version for £89 if I also purchase a £1.15 mouse as well. The thing
    >> is, I not sure what the difference is between the full retail version and
    >> the OEM one. Are there, in fact, any differences? Are there any
    >> restrictions placed on the OEM version? This would just be for a single
    >> PC.
    >
    > An OEM version comes w/ no MS support. (I'm assuming this is a full OEM
    > version, nor a crippled Dell-specific version, for example)
    >
    > If you're halfway competent, go for the OEM version and save yourself a
    > big chunk of money.
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