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Using Linksy WRT54G Access Point & Sony PEG-UX50

Last response: in Cell Phones & Smartphones
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December 2, 2004 5:48:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

A friend of mine and I FINALLY were able to get the Sony PEG-UX50 to get the
WEP key and the SSID from the wireless router AFTER telling the router to
broadcast its SSID!

Everything I have read told me >not< to broadcast the SSID. After
broadcasting the SSID the Sony PEG-UX50 it was able to exchange information
and connect without any problems to the Internet via the Linksys WRT54G
Router. It appears that once there has been an exchange of "keys" the SSID
no longer needs to be broadcasted.

Are there exceptions to the "not broadcasting the SSID" rule? Or did I setup
the Sony PEG-UX50 properly?

Thanks!
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 6:37:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <bZydnenSoPtZ7DLcRVn-hA@rogers.com>, Terabyte wrote:
> A friend of mine and I FINALLY were able to get the Sony PEG-UX50 to get the
> WEP key and the SSID from the wireless router AFTER telling the router to
> broadcast its SSID!

Sounds like the Sony WiFi implementation looks for the AP to
broadcast the SSID before it tries to connect. Check with Sony to see
if there's an update, and if not, request one.

> Everything I have read told me >not< to broadcast the SSID.

It's a good idea. It'll stop casual leeches, but won't even slow down
a determined cracker. Think of it like locking a screen door on the
outside of your front door. Doesn't offer any real protection, but does
indicate that you don't want people using your AP.

It's not strictly necessary. WEP is where the real security is, like
a wooden front door. (And think of WPA and so forth as a steel-reinforced
door.) Rotate your WEP keys regularly and you should be pretty safe.

--
Sincerely,

Ray Ingles (313) 227-2317

"The computing industry is given 12 months to deploy a technology
that does not exist and whose sole purpose is to protect profits.
The car industry was allowed decades to deploy safety features such
as seat belts and air bags that were designed to save lives."
- Zeinfeld, on the SSSCA, a proposed law that would mandate all
computers to prevent any file copying whatsoever unless explicitly
approved by the entertainment conglomerates
December 3, 2004 2:06:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Ray Ingles" <sorceror@dmc22317.local> wrote in message
news:slrncquvf9.oik.sorceror@dmc22317.local...
> In article <bZydnenSoPtZ7DLcRVn-hA@rogers.com>, Terabyte wrote:
>
> Sounds like the Sony WiFi implementation looks for the AP to
> broadcast the SSID before it tries to connect. Check with Sony to see
> if there's an update, and if not, request one.
>
I will see what I can find out from Sony. I don't care for the way their
WiFi implementation.
>
"Ray Ingles" <sorceror@dmc22317.local> wrote in message
news:slrncquvf9.oik.sorceror@dmc22317.local...
> It's not strictly necessary. WEP is where the real security is, like
> a wooden front door. (And think of WPA and so forth as a steel-reinforced
> door.) Rotate your WEP keys regularly and you should be pretty safe.
>
I am using WEP as well as MAC filtering. I know that WEP slows things down a
bit but I rather be safe
than sorry. I rotate the WEP keys at least once a week.

Thanks Ray for your input!!!!
Related resources
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 9:51:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 23:06:47 -0500, Terabyte wrote:

> I am using WEP as well as MAC filtering. I know that WEP slows things
> down a bit but I rather be safe
> than sorry. I rotate the WEP keys at least once a week.

1.) Rotate your WEP keys often
2.) Disable SSID broadcast
3.) Disable DHCP
4.) Use MAC address filtering
5.) Change the WAP radio channel weekly

That should keep you safe from sniffers for a bit.
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 11:40:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

David A. Desrosiers <hacker@gnu-designs.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 23:06:47 -0500, Terabyte wrote:
>
>> I am using WEP as well as MAC filtering. I know that WEP slows things
>> down a bit but I rather be safe
>> than sorry. I rotate the WEP keys at least once a week.
>
> 1.) Rotate your WEP keys often
> 2.) Disable SSID broadcast
> 3.) Disable DHCP
> 4.) Use MAC address filtering
> 5.) Change the WAP radio channel weekly
>
> That should keep you safe from sniffers for a bit.

How does disabling DHCP help? Feel free to be technical.

As for changing the channel, that won't help at all, since near all
equipment these days will auto-switch channels with the AP.
Changing it *to* channel 12 or 13 might help a bit, as that excludes most
WiFi equipment meant for the US market. Of course, it might exclude your
own devices too, and doesn't add any security -- it just cuts down on the
number of compatible devices.

Regards,
--
*Art
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 2:36:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <copqbu$o0h$1@cauldron.broomstick.com>, Arthur Hagen wrote:
> How does disabling DHCP help? Feel free to be technical.

Most clients are set up to get their IP address and DNS server
addresses from the server. If you don't provide them, they have
to set their own IP address, and find a DNS server somewhere.

It's not a strong security feature (if they can get through WEP,
they can probably sniff traffic and figure out a valid IP address)
but it is another hoop for an attacker to jump through. Eventually
it becomes not worth the bother when they can go down the street
and hook up to an unsecured AP.

A lot of security is like that. You can't make it *impossible*
for people to break in, but you can often make breaking in more
expensive than what you're securing.

--

Sincerely,

Ray Ingles (313) 227-2317

"If one is really a superior person, the fact is likely to
leak out without too much assistance." - John Andrew Holmes
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 8:50:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Ray Ingles wrote:

> In article <copqbu$o0h$1@cauldron.broomstick.com>, Arthur Hagen wrote:
>
>>How does disabling DHCP help? Feel free to be technical.
>
>
> Most clients are set up to get their IP address and DNS server
> addresses from the server. If you don't provide them, they have
> to set their own IP address, and find a DNS server somewhere.
>
> It's not a strong security feature (if they can get through WEP,
> they can probably sniff traffic and figure out a valid IP address)
> but it is another hoop for an attacker to jump through.

In my mind, if they can sniff traffic, they have already broken in.

Personally, I don't use wireless ethernet, but if I did, I would
have a simple policy: turn on WEP, change the keys regularly
(although weekly seems like too big a bother), and then still
treat it as an insecure network, meaning using only secure
protocols (like SSH and SSL). If I needed to use a protocol
that isn't itself secure, I'd use some sort of VPN or tunnel
to create a secure virtual network on top of the wireless ethernet.

Yes, it would be slow, but being able to sleep at night is better
than having optimal speed during the day.

- Logan
!