XP Home to XP Pro

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hi I have a new machine with XP Home on which I am going to upgrade to XP
Pro

Is it better to clean off drive and do a reinstall with XP Pro, or is it
possible to simply do an upgrade, and if so are their likely to be issues
down the line?

Cheers
A
15 answers Last reply
More about home
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    It's all subjective, Fresh removes all traces of existing programs and
    settings but takes longer to re-create a fully configured system. Doing
    an upgrade is easier & quicker but always has the potential to carry
    forward any issues present in the original setup. If your current setup
    is working to your requirements, then Image it (As a fall-back measure)
    and proceed with the upgrade. Regardless of the approach, I would
    at the least make sure all your irreplaceable data is backed up. There
    isn't a case I've found of having "Too" many backups.

    "Alex H" <somone@somewhere.com> wrote in message
    news:%23IDhPsHuFHA.3896@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Hi I have a new machine with XP Home on which I am going to upgrade to XP
    > Pro
    >
    > Is it better to clean off drive and do a reinstall with XP Pro, or is it
    > possible to simply do an upgrade, and if so are their likely to be issues
    > down the line?
    >
    > Cheers
    > A
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    The "NT to NT" upgrades fare a lot better than the ""DOS/Windows" to NT"
    "upgrades". I would go with the upgrade but as mentioned by R.McCarty,
    always have a current backup, in the case things go pear shaped.

    Alex H wrote:

    > Hi I have a new machine with XP Home on which I am going to upgrade to XP
    > Pro
    >
    > Is it better to clean off drive and do a reinstall with XP Pro, or is it
    > possible to simply do an upgrade, and if so are their likely to be issues
    > down the line?
    >
    > Cheers
    > A
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Alex H wrote:
    > Hi I have a new machine with XP Home on which I am going to upgrade to XP
    > Pro
    >
    > Is it better to clean off drive and do a reinstall with XP Pro, or is it
    > possible to simply do an upgrade, and if so are their likely to be issues
    > down the line?

    Clean install, but only if you have the CDs and Product Keys / Serial
    Numbers / Activation Codes for all your installed software.
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Alex H" <somone@somewhere.com> wrote:

    >Hi I have a new machine with XP Home on which I am going to upgrade to XP
    >Pro
    >
    >Is it better to clean off drive and do a reinstall with XP Pro, or is it
    >possible to simply do an upgrade, and if so are their likely to be issues
    >down the line?

    The Home to Pro upgrade will probably be the simplest and easiest OS
    upgrade you'll ever do. It's always a good idea to back up data you
    can't afford to lose before doing something like this, but I certainly
    wouldn't bother scraping the disk and installing clean. Put the XP Pro
    disk in the drive and choose "Upgrade".

    --
    Tim Slattery
    MS MVP(DTS)
    Slattery_T@bls.gov
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks everyone.

    As its a brand new laptop out of box, and has no data or programmes on it -
    I'll go with the upgrade, and use the recovery disks if it all goes opear
    shaped

    Thanks for everyone's input
    Alex
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:eWzgSfIuFHA.596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    Alex H <AlexH@nospammer.mismet.co.uk> typed:

    > Thanks everyone.
    >
    > As its a brand new laptop out of box, and has no data or
    > programmes
    > on it - I'll go with the upgrade, and use the recovery disks if
    > it
    > all goes opear shaped


    Although that's normally the best plan, in your case it doesn't
    much matter, since a clean installation isn't really much harder
    than an upgrade if there are no programs or data on it.

    But over and above the issue of "how," I'd like to address the
    issue of "whether." Are you sure you want to do this? Are you
    aware that XP Home and Professional are identical except that
    Professional includes a few features (mostly related to security
    and networking) missing from Home? Most home users don't need and
    would never use these extra features and will see no benefits by
    upgrading.

    For details go to
    http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/windowsxp_home_pro.asp

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/whichxp.asp

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/home/howtobuy/choosing2.asp

    Also note that Professional allows ten concurrent network
    connections, and Home only five.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Alex H" <AlexH@nospammer.mismet.co.uk> wrote:

    >Thanks everyone.
    >
    >As its a brand new laptop out of box, and has no data or programmes on it -
    >I'll go with the upgrade, and use the recovery disks if it all goes opear
    >shaped
    >
    >Thanks for everyone's input
    >Alex
    >

    One additional thought. What is the make and model of your laptop?

    Did you check to see if the same model was available with XP Pro
    preinstalled?

    At least some manufacturers do offer XP Pro as an option with their
    new machines, and getting it that way would be a lot less expensive
    and far less hassle than purchasing a separate Pro Upgrade package.

    Good luck

    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
    http://aumha.org/alex.htm
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:OK1RNuKuFHA.464@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    Alex H <AlexH@nospammer.mismet.co.uk> typed:

    > Ken
    >
    > Thanks for your post, yes appreciate that, in fact I need to
    > connect
    > this laptop to our domain.


    Good, then you do need Pro. I was just checking because
    unfortunately a fair number of people want Pro because they
    mistakenly think it's indefinably "better."

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > Unfortunately, couldn't get the
    > specification of Laptop with XP Pro,already installed - real
    > bummer.
    >
    > I've c hecked with vendor and officially they state that they
    > wont
    > support any software issues due to change ofOS, as we have some
    > 40 of
    > their laptops across our company, they unofficially say it wont
    > be a
    > problem
    > A
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Alex H wrote:
    > Hi I have a new machine with XP Home on which I am going to upgrade to XP
    > Pro
    >
    > Is it better to clean off drive and do a reinstall with XP Pro, or is it
    > possible to simply do an upgrade, and if so are their likely to be issues
    > down the line?
    >
    > Cheers
    > A
    >
    >


    Some people will recommend that you perform a clean installation,
    rather than upgrade over an earlier OS. For the most part, I feel
    that these people, while well-meaning, are living in the past, and are
    basing their recommendation on their experiences with older operating
    systems. You'd probably save a lot of time by upgrading your PC to
    WinXP, rather than performing a clean installation, if you've no
    hardware or software incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved
    (over earlier versions of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade
    an earlier OS.

    WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
    system while simultaneously preserving your applications and data, and
    translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
    designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things
    can go wrong, in a small number of cases. If your data is at all
    important to you, back it up before proceeding.

    The upgrade from WinXP Home to WinXP Pro, in particular, almost
    always goes smoothly, as both operating systems use the same kernel.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Z wrote:
    > Alex H wrote:

    >
    > Clean install,


    Why? There's certainly no technical reason to do so.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Hi Ron

    Thanks for your post

    Yes we wanted the laptop with XP Pro, but not available with the spec we
    wanted. Not really a problem since I have a dozen or soXP Pro licences
    available. See my post to Ken above

    C heers

    Alex
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In article <#hQk48MuFHA.2540@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl>,
    bchambers@cable0ne.n3t says...
    > Z wrote:
    > > Alex H wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Clean install,
    >
    >
    > Why? There's certainly no technical reason to do so.

    File Fragmentation, placement of the page file, left over artifacts that
    are not needed, removal of old software that you really didn't need any
    more or that you didn't know was installed. Even shrinking of the
    registry.


    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in news:MPG.1d91c43da6d3a0b898a03a@news-
    server.columbus.rr.com:

    > In article <#hQk48MuFHA.2540@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl>,
    > bchambers@cable0ne.n3t says...
    >> Z wrote:
    >> > Alex H wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Clean install,
    >>
    >>
    >> Why? There's certainly no technical reason to do so.
    >
    > File Fragmentation, placement of the page file, left over artifacts
    that
    > are not needed, removal of old software that you really didn't need any
    > more or that you didn't know was installed. Even shrinking of the
    > registry.
    >
    >

    With a brand new system?
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Asher_N wrote:
    >>> Why? There's certainly no technical reason to do so.

    >> File Fragmentation, placement of the page file, left over artifacts
    >> that are not needed, removal of old software that you really
    >> didn't need any more or that you didn't know was installed. Even
    >> shrinking of the registry.

    > With a brand new system?

    When I get a brand new system it's always got some stuff on it I don't
    want - AOL or Earthlink offers, for example. Or McAfee 30-day / 90-day
    trial software already installed. Ugh. And crippled Corel OEM s/w that
    I'd rather just not have at all.

    Uninstalling is an option, sure, but half the time the uninstall just
    removes the hooks into the apps and the .dlls and many other remnants of
    the s/w (Application Data trees, registry keys, etc) remain.

    Also, the hard drive is never partitioned the way I want it (and I'm too
    cheap to buy PM).
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Leythos wrote:

    >
    > File Fragmentation, placement of the page file, left over artifacts that
    > are not needed, removal of old software that you really didn't need any
    > more or that you didn't know was installed. Even shrinking of the
    > registry.
    >
    >


    None of which applies to either a properly maintained system or a new
    system right out of the box.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
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