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Copying VCR tape to DVD

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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March 17, 2011 2:12:47 PM

I know the easiest way to copy a VCR tape to a DVD is to spend $200 and get a dual machine made for that purpose. But after I record the VCR's to DVD I will have an extra DVD player I won't need. I have a computer running Win 7, AMD Athlon 3+ GHz dual core processor, 6 GB RAM and a Hauppague 1800 TV card with coax antenna and cable inputs. The card works well and am able to record programs through Win Media Center onto the HD. I think by hooking up a VCR tape to the coax antenna input Win Media Center will recognize the signal and I will be able to record it onto my 1 TB HD. Then I just copy that onto a DVD. Am I missing something? Has anyone done this?

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March 18, 2011 2:37:07 AM

I used HVR-1950 to do this. After capturing the video, use Movie Maker or similar software to edit and then burn to DVDs after selecting the appropriate format. Try it out on a 5-minute video first and familiarize yourself first. The process is time intensive.
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March 18, 2011 12:07:26 PM

Ubrales said:
I used HVR-1950 to do this. After capturing the video, use Movie Maker or similar software to edit and then burn to DVDs after selecting the appropriate format. Try it out on a 5-minute video first and familiarize yourself first. The process is time intensive.


Thank you. I assume I just connect the VCR coax out to the TV card antenna coax input, configure Media Center so it will work with the "new" input, same as was done in setting up the cable TV input, open Media Center and record the video.

I want to be able to play the DVD on the computer and on a DVD player connected to a TV. What format would you recommend?

Is this process any more time consuming than getting a dual VCR / DVD recorder? With a VCR / DVD combo I think you just set up the tape and DVD and hit record. It most likely records the DVD in real time as the tape plays, all at once. It would be faster but then you have minimal control over what you are recording.

With using a computer set up I assume you record the VCR to the HD, edit the video and then record to a DVD. I think I should be able to walk away from the computer while recording either VCR or DVD. I know the computer will finalize the DVD when it is done but not sure about recording the VCR tape onto the HD. It could be that with no one there to stop recording manually the HD will keep on recording noise when the VCR comes to the end of the tape.

I know I have asked a lot of questions. I usually figure these things out myself but then that's the value of this forum, you can ask someone who has done it.

Thanks,

Tom
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March 18, 2011 1:07:46 PM

Maineman said:
Thank you. I assume I just connect the VCR coax out to the TV card antenna coax input, configure Media Center so it will work with the "new" input, same as was done in setting up the cable TV input, open Media Center and record the video.

I want to be able to play the DVD on the computer and on a DVD player connected to a TV. What format would you recommend?

Is this process any more time consuming than getting a dual VCR / DVD recorder? With a VCR / DVD combo I think you just set up the tape and DVD and hit record. It most likely records the DVD in real time as the tape plays, all at once. It would be faster but then you have minimal control over what you are recording.

With using a computer set up I assume you record the VCR to the HD, edit the video and then record to a DVD. I think I should be able to walk away from the computer while recording either VCR or DVD. I know the computer will finalize the DVD when it is done but not sure about recording the VCR tape onto the HD. It could be that with no one there to stop recording manually the HD will keep on recording noise when the VCR comes to the end of the tape.

Tom

Tom, everything you stated here is correct. It is a time-consuming process. Regarding the format; choose one that your DVD player will handle. Not all DVD players play all DVD formats. Speed-wise I prefer standard play; 2 hours on a 4.7 GB DVD (re-writable)

The VCD/DVD combo is an expensive choice.

Yes, you can start your recording and walk away. I have done this. And yes, after the VCR is finished playing, the HDD will record noise. I have done this too! LOL.

Start with a 5-minute tape and experiment. This is how I did it. The nice feature about this is the editing part. I used HVR-1950 capture device, Windows Movie Maker or ULead DVD Movie Factory (both slightly different, and has advantages/disadvantages).

Good Luck!
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March 18, 2011 5:22:13 PM

Thank you. I will get this set up over the weekend.
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March 18, 2011 6:14:08 PM

since VCR tapes are probably SD (320p i believe) you should be able to fit at least 4-8 on a single disk if you wanted to go that route. no use in recording at high definition when the input is standard def.
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March 19, 2011 10:42:19 AM

Thank you, I had not thought of that. I usually set the DVD recorder to finalize the DVD. Will have to explore how to add additional movies to one DVD. I assume each movie will be a discrete file or maybe show up as a chapter that can be searched for and played when needed.

I also have a 6 hour long documentary I recorded on to 3 VCR tapes. I think I can edit them and combine into one film and then record. On second thought that would be very time consuming and might work just as well leaving them as is. Who has time to sit and watch a 6 hour program anyway.

Thanks,

Tom
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March 19, 2011 3:14:42 PM

Use rewritable DVDs. It will give you the flexibility of future changes.
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March 19, 2011 8:24:36 PM

Best answer selected by Maineman.
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March 19, 2011 11:38:23 PM

Thank you!
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January 28, 2012 8:54:29 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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