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What do you think is the best anti virus software for WIN7

Tags:
  • Security
  • Antivirus
  • Software
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
November 27, 2012 9:43:48 AM

Hi,
Could everyone that reads this thread give their own opinion about what is the best anti virus for WIN7.
Could you also take these factors into account: least amount of RAM used (certainly not Norton), best GUI, best scanning system, best security.

Thanks
-e-coli

More about : anti virus software win7

November 27, 2012 9:50:06 AM

I'm partial to Avast. It seems to be the most secure of the free suit (better than most paid-for suits), has fairly minimal performance and resource impact, and the UI couldn't be much easier to use IMO. Scanning has also never given me a problem.
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November 27, 2012 9:51:20 AM

e-coli said:
Hi,
Could everyone that reads this thread give their own opinion about what is the best anti virus for WIN7.
Could you also take these factors into account: least amount of RAM used (certainly not Norton), best GUI, best scanning system, best security.

Thanks
-e-coli

http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x148/jlimage/NvidiaUser.png


Microsoft Security Essentials
windows.microsoft.com/en-US/.../security-essentials-download
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November 27, 2012 9:54:07 AM

Is there any "paid" virus software that anyone could recommend as I am not a fan of Microsoft Security. Also I do not mind spending some money for extra good security.
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November 27, 2012 9:56:01 AM

The best anti-virus you can get, is the end user.
It takes up zero system resources, and is the best security available.

Malicious links stick out like a sore thumb, do not click them.
Pirating programs is bound to give you viruses as well.
Someone sends you a file with the name "checkthisout.exe" or "nipslip.exe", don't open it.

Common sense is the best antivirus there is out there. I have stopped loading any form of anti malware on my machines, and they are significantly faster by doing so. Once in a while I run adaware and malwarebytes, but they have never picked up anything because I am careful with how I use my computer.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 9:58:02 AM

AVG's free offering is pretty good, and I used to use ESET in the past as a paid option.
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November 27, 2012 9:58:39 AM

azathoth said:
The best anti-virus you can get, is the end user.
It takes up zero system resources, and is the best security available.

Malicious links stick out like a sore thumb, do not click them.
Pirating programs is bound to give you viruses as well.
Someone sends you a file with the name "checkthisout.exe" or "nipslip.exe", don't open it.

Common sense is the best antivirus there is out there. I have stopped loading any form of anti malware on my machines, and they are significantly faster by doing so. Once in a while I run adaware and malwarebytes, but they have never picked up anything because I am careful with how I use my computer.


It has been proven that many anti-malware suits do not hinder performance much at all most of the time (scans and such can obviously take a big hit, but even then, anyone with an SSD is unlikely to have any issue from them).

Also, even legitimate sites get hacked occasionally and you wouldn't even know about the infection you get when you visit the site unless it makes itself known or you do a scan, if even then.

Common sense is probably the most important factor of security, but it shouldn't be relied on as the only factor.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 9:58:54 AM

+1 one for common sense. It's easily the best form of protection. Eset is supposedly good but I don't rate it. I just use microsoft and superantispyware and malwarebytes for scans occasionally.
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November 27, 2012 10:03:32 AM

My support team for a UK-wide application thoroughly hates AVG as it causes no-end of issues. Over the summer it was such a pain that it now has it's own category in our support-call stats.

I moved from an Enterpise deployment of Sophos to MS Security Essentials. I'm not one to often recommend M$ applications, but in 4 years and well over 150 deployments, never gives any trouble. Light, fast and unobtrusive. No AV is perfect (and +1 to the common sense comments), but it has done a good job for me and mine.
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November 27, 2012 10:04:05 AM

Thanks for all your useful opinions guys!
Before I choose the best answer and make the thread locked I will wait for more opinions from other people.
-ecoli
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November 27, 2012 10:05:00 AM

MS Security Essentials most certainly is an excellent AV, but it's a little too basic for my preferences. Even Avast's home version has protection from a much wider variety of attacks compared to MSSE in my experience.
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November 27, 2012 10:07:27 AM

Ok, cool. Could you please give me the actual details of different types of protection.

iLike GTX640
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November 27, 2012 10:12:06 AM

Web shield, file shield, and much more... Sorry, my memory isn't great after pulling an all-nighter and I'm not using Avast on the computer that I'm using now (home version doesn't support Server 2008 R2 :(  ).

If you don't mind, you could give it and/or some other anti-malware programs a quick test-drive (one at a time, of course) to see if you have a personal preference.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 12:58:04 PM

blazorthon said:
Also, even legitimate sites get hacked occasionally


This is why you have antivirus.
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November 27, 2012 1:01:27 PM

mi1ez said:
This is why you have antivirus.


That's my point.
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November 27, 2012 1:06:54 PM

Personally, I've had the best results with Kaspersky and Bitdefender.

The two go back and forth, but lately it seems like Bitdefender has been a little more robust.

It's designed for multiple types of devices, supports most OSes, and can even locate any device runnng the system and remote lock/wipe it (tested with my laptop once--pretty neat).

It isn't cheap, but in a couple years with a bunch of reckless people using my systems it hasn't been infected once.

As for what the OP asked, I think Kaspersky has a simpler UI and is easier to use, but it seems Bitdefender is less ram intensive and provides better background scanning/security.
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a b 8 Security
a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 2:12:29 PM

Bitdefender Total Security 2013 is supposed to have topped the latest testing charts.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 2:23:25 PM

e-coli said:
Hi,
Could everyone that reads this thread give their own opinion about what is the best anti virus for WIN7.
Could you also take these factors into account: least amount of RAM used (certainly not Norton), best GUI, best scanning system, best security.

Thanks
-e-coli

http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x148/jlimage/NvidiaUser.png


Never use free security, downloaded from the internet, it's a scam. You have been WARNED.
Use only a professional, all in one security system.
Do not use multiple, mismatched security programs, they conflict with each other.
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November 27, 2012 2:27:23 PM

soundguruman said:
Never use free security, downloaded from the internet, it's a scam. You have been WARNED.
Use only a professional, all in one security system.
Do not use multiple, mismatched security programs, they conflict with each other.


A lot of free security suits are great and not scams.

You don't need a professional security suit.

Using multiple, mismatched programs generally only causes conflicts if you have multiple programs of the same type, not different programs of different types (IE don't get two different firewalls or anti-virus suits, but you usually can have one anti-virus suit and one firewall that aren't from the same company). For example, I've used Avast Home Edition (free) with Comodo Firewall (did not install the Comodo AV because that would have conflicted with Avast and is an inferior AV, or at least it was last year when I did my installs). I've even thrown Spyboy Search and Destroy along with Threat-fire in there without any issues.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 2:35:30 PM

blazorthon said:
That's my point.

I know. That was directed to those saying the best antivirus is the user.
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a b 8 Security
a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 4:22:40 PM

Hi :) 

Norton Internet Security 2013...and it uses virtually no resources..that problem was resolved around 4 years ago...

And my recommendation comes from the fact I fix viruses EVERY day...

All the best Brett :) 
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a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 5:02:35 PM

Microsoft Security Essentials. Three PCs, using it as long as it has existed, and had one virus get through.

I booted with Kaspersky's free rescue CD, fixed it, and went about business.

Do periodically run a Malwarebytes scan.

Cannot see the value of a paid suite.
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Anonymous
a b 8 Security
a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 6:11:29 PM

There is no "best" - there are several very capable products but none of them can nor do claim to be the best, only fanbois make such claims.
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Anonymous
a b 8 Security
a b $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 6:14:09 PM

soundguruman said:
Never use free security, downloaded from the internet, it's a scam. You have been WARNED.
Use only a professional, all in one security system.
Do not use multiple, mismatched security programs, they conflict with each other.


What complete and utter bollox

"You have been WARNED." - I for one would like to know how exactly does your "warning" carry any authority.

"Use only a professional, all in one security system" - Actually security professionals will tell you to take a multi-layered approach to security using different vendors for different areas. Reason:- All in one products have a common code base. What exactly do you class as "Professional" you will not find any consumer class products in use in SMB/SMEs, well none that have been advised correctly anyway.

"Do not use multiple, mismatched security programs, they conflict with each other." - If you install 2 AV products or 2 firewalls then yes conflicts are a given, but using one vendors AV and another vendors Firewall is OK.
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November 27, 2012 6:17:47 PM

aramisathei said:
Personally, I've had the best results with Kaspersky and Bitdefender.


Second on Kaspersky. Get it on Amazon or Ebay at a nice discount. Been using it for years, love it.
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November 27, 2012 6:22:39 PM

Interesting topic...99% of people who reply will recommend the software they are using, and trust me when I tell you that most people are very, very much mislead about the efficiency and effectiveness of their security solutions. Let me just tell you that there's no perfect and bulletproof security software out there. It does not exist.

Go for free, simple and one that updates regularly and doesn't suffer from the onslaught of false-positives. I have tried them all, from free to some of the paid solutions, and I have to tell you that I settled with MSE. Very streamlined, effective and low-resource footprint make it a practical decision. Avast is good too, and so is AVG. Stay away from those that cost money. They are not better in any way, even if "tests" might claim otherwise!
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November 27, 2012 6:34:09 PM

soundguruman said:
Never use free security, downloaded from the internet, it's a scam. You have been WARNED.
Use only a professional, all in one security system.
Do not use multiple, mismatched security programs, they conflict with each other.

soundguruman, with all due respect, you must be kidding with your comment! Right? I mean the free ones being a scam... I think it's the opposite, those ones that not only do you have to buy but then pay for annually to keep up-to-date are the real scams. I have tried all the popular ones, multiple versions of Norton (three or so), two versions of McAfee, BitDefender and Kaspersky. Most of them I received for free through the publishers due to my work, and I generally ran them all for weeks (of course, not at the same time), and I have to say that if I was obligated to keep one, I would have only considered BitDefender, and even that not so willingly because it had a bug that even Bitdefender acknowledged and their official solution was for me to buy the next version... Great solution. I didn't pay a cent for it, but I can imagine how I would have felt (and those that noticed the bug also) being a paid customer and for them to tell me to upgrade (they did not offer a free upgrade, not even a discount...I still have their reply). So no, paid for solutions are real scams, sorry to tell you. Yes they might work, they might even work well, but so do the free ones.
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November 27, 2012 7:39:05 PM

Avast is amazing. It's the only AV that I've used that actually blocks viruses in real time. The shields include File System, Network, Behavior, Script, IM, P2P, Mail and Web. There's a Virus Alert feature where you can set the program up to send emails out to multiple accounts if something gets blocked or if something gets picked up by a scan. It also has a silent/gaming mode for all you gamers out there.
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a b 8 Security
a c 155 è Antivirus
a c 602 $ Windows 7
November 27, 2012 7:44:31 PM

Norton 2013 or Gdata Internet Security.
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November 27, 2012 7:57:08 PM

Trend Micro isn't bad. I do agree Avast is amazing as well. I always thought the rule of thumb was if you didn't pay for it then its not protecting you. That's what I was always told when it comes to this, but that all changed with Avast.
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November 27, 2012 8:20:18 PM

Microsoft Security Essentials and run a scan with Malwarebytes on a weekly basis, or when you feel paranoid about a site you just visited. Has been working for me on >500 workstations in the past few years.
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