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Treo650 v Blackberry

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December 7, 2004 8:47:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Has anyone done an investigation as to the specific features and
benefits of each of these devices. Ultimately they seem similar in
almost every way. One thing that I really don't understand is the
email. How does the treo work v the blackberry.

I heard rumors that for the treo to work your computer must be on, and
it must be forwarding your messages to versamail. Is this true. How
does the blackberry work instead.
Any information will be greatly appreciated

More about : treo650 blackberry

December 8, 2004 12:17:17 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On 7 Dec 2004 17:47:07 -0800, "Mark" <mpinsley@yahoo.com> removed the
duct tape and proclaimed:

>Has anyone done an investigation as to the specific features and
>benefits of each of these devices. Ultimately they seem similar in
>almost every way. One thing that I really don't understand is the
>email. How does the treo work v the blackberry.
>
>I heard rumors that for the treo to work your computer must be on, and
>it must be forwarding your messages to versamail. Is this true. How
>does the blackberry work instead.
>Any information will be greatly appreciated

The Blackberry's email it "pushed" to the device (not unlike text
messaging on a phone), while a Palm has to got and fetch your mail.
The Blackberry is, in effect, always connected, while the Palm has to
connect at regular intervals and go check for mail. You can fetch your
mail directly from a POP mail server if you wish. Or you could try to
remotely sync with your PC.

What the Palm lacks in connectivity, it makes up significantly in
available software. The Palm and the Blackberry run entirely different
operating systems, and there is not as much software available for the
Blackberry.

If what you need is primarily a communications device, the Blackberry
could be the thing for you. If you want load of games, utilities,
productivity software, etc, the Palm does that very well.

About a year ago, RIM and Palm had announced that they were going to
develop something together. To me, a Palm with Blackberry connectivity
would be the ultimate device. Has anybody heard anything on that
front?


--
I put 2 and 2 together and got 22.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 10:20:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <pbocr0h8oi095uqel6hvvb8bt6ilh0ee8h@4ax.com>, Bruno
<insert@address.here> wrote:

> The Blackberry's email it "pushed" to the device (not unlike text
> messaging on a phone), while a Palm has to got and fetch your mail.
> The Blackberry is, in effect, always connected, while the Palm has to
> connect at regular intervals and go check for mail. You can fetch your
> mail directly from a POP mail server if you wish. Or you could try to
> remotely sync with your PC.

Your carrier may also have a "push" email service that delivers email to
your wireless Palm. What Blackberry does is no longer unique.

> What the Palm lacks in connectivity, it makes up significantly in
> available software. The Palm and the Blackberry run entirely different
> operating systems, and there is not as much software available for the
> Blackberry.

No comparison. The Blackberry's main feature seems to be the push email,
which, as mentioned, is no longer unique to it.
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Anonymous
December 8, 2004 11:02:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On 7 Dec 2004, in comp.dcom.telecom Mark <mpinsley@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Has anyone done an investigation as to the specific features and
> benefits of each of these devices. Ultimately they seem similar in
> almost every way. One thing that I really don't understand is the
> email. How does the treo work v the blackberry.

There are fundamental differences between the Blackberry and a Treo
600/650, and then some important differences within the same device
model:

1. RESALE VALUE As an educational experience, go off to eBay and see
what the resale value of a Blackberry is, as compared to the resale
value of a Treo 600 or 650.

2. OPERATING SYSTEM The Blackberry runs an obscure proprietary
operating system, with very few third-party applications. The Treo
runs a third-party well-documented operating system from
PalmSource.com, PalmOS 5, with over 20,000 applications available.
Visit http://freewarepalm.com for an idea of how much is out there
for Palms.

3. BUNDLED SOFTWARE The Treo 650 is bundled with Documents To Go
from DataViz, reviewed as being better at editing and viewing Word
and Excel files than even Pocket Word and Pocket Excel on a Pocket
PC. You can read/write/edit M$ Word and Excel documents, loaded
through the sync process, insert via an SD card or receive by e-mail
attachment. Here's a list of what else you get:
Phone, Contacts, Calendar, VersaMail, Messaging (SMS), Media, Camera,
Camcorder, Web browser, RealPlayer, Tasks, Memos, Calculator, World
Clock, HotSync® Manager (program for your desktop for syncing data in
and out), link to Microsoft Outlook (Windows only), AudiblePlayer
(MP3s), Palm™ eReader (e-books), and games (Zap! 2016 & Solitaire).

You can check and see what software comes with the Blackberry model
you're interested in at http://www.blackberry.com

4. CELLULAR CARRIER The original Blackberries worked on a two-way
paging network which was elegant and very robust, but now is in
serious decline. Now, Blackberries work over SMR (mobile radio)
networks like NEXTEL, SOUTHERN LINC and MIKE (they're not really
cellular companies, although they act like it), as well as on
cellular and PCS-cellular carriers like SprintPCS, Telus Mobility,
Bell Mobility, Rogers, T-Mobile and Cingular. I am wary of NEXTEL
because the data feed is _very_ slow (9.6kbps), even when compared to
poky ol' GPRS (38kbps download with Cingular, Rogers, T-Mobile)), not
to mention SPCS speed with their 1xRTT/CDMA system (50-70 kbps in
real life).


> I heard rumors that for the treo to work your computer must be on, and
> it must be forwarding your messages to versamail. Is this true. How
> does the blackberry work instead? Any information will be greatly
> appreciated.

Both the Blackberry and the Treo can work with or without your PC on.
If your company has bought an e-mail server running special software
from Blackberry or Good Technology, that can autoforward e-mail to
your handheld without requiring your PC be turned on for forwarding.

Has your company bought that special server and software and
installed it? If not, than your PC can be set up to forward mail, or
there's another approach.

My Palm machine (a Tungsten W, but the same trick works with Treos)
gets an SMS sent to it by T-Mobile (my cellular carrier) whenever an
e-mail comes into to any one of several e-mail addresses which meets
criteria I specify (from wife, from other family, from Red Cross or
has any of a series of special phrases in the Subject line of the
message). The e-mail address has to be served by a POP3 or IMAP
server, but almost every mail server has the capability. (Yahoo makes
you pay for POP3 access, BTW.)

This is a poor man's forwarding server, as I don't get the entire
message in the SMS; but, I do get notified, I do see who sent it and
the subject line. If it is really worthy, I can pick it up with
VersaMail very quickly.


The USENET news group comp.sys.handhelds is another good place to answer
these and more for Blackberry e-mail questions.

--

John Bartley K7AAY
Author, Wireless Palm FAQ, Handheld's Cellular Data FAQ & PalmSource
Expert Guide to Amateur Radio
kiloseven.blogspot.com


--
John Bartley K7AAY http://celdata.cjb.net
This post quad-ROT-13 encrypted; reading it violates the DMCA.
"We're not living in a simulation. We're living in a collaborative SF novel... and now, of course, it's Philip K. Dick's turn. In a back room somewhere, Vernor Vinge and George Orwell are currently arguing about who gets to take over in 2025." (Ross Smith)
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 3:40:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article news:41b75d97.12888015@news.individual.de, johnbartley@email.com wrote:
>The USENET news group comp.sys.handhelds is another good place to answer
>these and more for Blackberry e-mail questions.
And Palm OS devices also have a GREAT Usenet newsreader client and I'm certain RIM/Blackberry will never have (even a poor one).
Check it out here (3.0 will be released in just a few days):
http://www.PalmYanoff.com
--
My plan to save the world:
more Jesus, less government!
http://www.PalmYanoff.com
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 3:40:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Hi Gregg,
> ...My plan to save the world: more Jesus, less government!
I'm ready for Jesus 2.0 (Nothing is really different, but the marketing
department has hyped up a release that is long overdue). Got to be better
than the way things are currently running. Whatta mean He didn't say "The
geeks shall inherit the Earth"?
David
David@IBMMuseum.com
!