FDISK the hard disk?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I want to re-install WindowsXP Pro on my notebook but don't have a floppy
disk, so how do I fdisk the hard disk?

Regards

Thief_
9 answers Last reply
More about fdisk hard disk
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    You dont need a disk or to use fdisk. Boot from the XP CD and during
    the initial screens you will have the option to partition your disk(s)
    however you like.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Thief_" <thief_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:OW0dHQbvFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >I want to re-install WindowsXP Pro on my notebook but don't have a floppy
    >disk, so how do I fdisk the hard disk?
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Thief_
    >


    The XP installation disk will allow you to format, create partitions or
    resize existing partitions.

    Ronnie Vernon
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Shell/User
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Doesn't your restore CD do that?

    "Thief_" <thief_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:OW0dHQbvFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > I want to re-install WindowsXP Pro on my notebook but don't have a floppy
    > disk, so how do I fdisk the hard disk?
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Thief_
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:OW0dHQbvFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    Thief_ <thief_@hotmail.com> typed:

    > I want to re-install WindowsXP Pro on my notebook but don't
    > have a
    > floppy disk, so how do I fdisk the hard disk?


    Even if you had one, that's not how you do it. FDISK is an old
    tool and can't even handle NTFS partitions.

    Just boot from the Windows XP CD (change the BIOS boot order if
    necessary to accomplish this) and follow the prompts for a clean
    installation (delete the existing partition by pressing "D" when
    prompted, then create a new one).
    You can find detailed instructions here:
    http://michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html

    or here http://windowsxp.mvps.org/XPClean.htm

    or here http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/clean_install.htm

    However why do you want to reformat and reinstall? In my view,
    it's usually a mistake. With a modicum of care, it should never
    be necessary to reinstall Windows (XP or any other version). I've
    run Windows 3.0, 3.1, WFWG 3.11, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows
    2000, and Windows XP, each for the period of time before the next
    version came out, and each on two machines here. I never
    reinstalled any of them, and I have never had anything more than
    an occasional minor problem.

    It's my belief that this mistaken notion stems from the technical
    support people at many of the larger OEMs. Their solution to
    almost any problem they don't quickly know the answer to is
    "reformat and reinstall." That's the perfect solution for them.
    It gets you off the phone quickly, it almost always works, and it
    doesn't require them to do any real troubleshooting (a skill that
    most of them obviously don't possess in any great degree).

    But it leaves you with all the work and all the problems. You
    have to restore all your data backups, you have to reinstall all
    your programs, you have to reinstall all the Windows and
    application updates,you have to locate and install all the needed
    drivers for your system, you have to recustomize Windows and all
    your apps to work the way you're comfortable with.

    Besides all those things being time-consuming and troublesome,
    you may have trouble with some of them: can you find all your
    application CDs? Can you find all the needed installation codes?
    Do you have data backups to restore? Do you even remember all the
    customizations and tweaks you may have installed to make
    everything work the way you like?

    Occasionally there are problems that are so difficult to solve
    that Windows should be reinstalled cleanly. But they are few and
    far between; reinstallation should not be a substitute for
    troubleshooting; it should be a last resort, to be done only
    after all other attempts at troubleshooting by a qualified person
    have failed.

    If you have problems, post them here; it's likely that someone
    can help you and a reinstallation won't be required.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Ken Blake wrote:
    > In news:OW0dHQbvFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    > Thief_ <thief_@hotmail.com> typed:
    >
    > > I want to re-install WindowsXP Pro on my notebook but don't
    > > have a
    > > floppy disk, so how do I fdisk the hard disk?
    >
    >
    > Even if you had one, that's not how you do it. FDISK is an old
    > tool and can't even handle NTFS partitions.

    I wouldn't use NTFS these days -- whatever theoretical
    superiority it may have to FAT32 is largely besides the
    point to being able to easily backup and recover from a
    serious Windows problem or infection.

    >
    > Just boot from the Windows XP CD (change the BIOS boot order if
    > necessary to accomplish this) and follow the prompts for a clean
    > installation (delete the existing partition by pressing "D" when
    > prompted, then create a new one).
    > You can find detailed instructions here:
    > http://michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html
    >
    > or here http://windowsxp.mvps.org/XPClean.htm
    >
    > or here http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/clean_install.htm
    >
    > However why do you want to reformat and reinstall? In my view,
    > it's usually a mistake. With a modicum of care, it should never
    > be necessary to reinstall Windows (XP or any other version). I've
    > run Windows 3.0, 3.1, WFWG 3.11, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows
    > 2000, and Windows XP, each for the period of time before the next
    > version came out, and each on two machines here. I never
    > reinstalled any of them, and I have never had anything more than
    > an occasional minor problem.

    If a PC has been whacked once too often with sophisticated
    worms or there have been an awful of programs installed
    and removed, especially with XP, a clean reinstall is just
    about the only thing that will get you back a speedy, clean
    running system.

    >
    > It's my belief that this mistaken notion stems from the technical
    > support people at many of the larger OEMs. Their solution to
    > almost any problem they don't quickly know the answer to is
    > "reformat and reinstall." That's the perfect solution for them.
    > It gets you off the phone quickly, it almost always works, and it
    > doesn't require them to do any real troubleshooting (a skill that
    > most of them obviously don't possess in any great degree).
    >
    > But it leaves you with all the work and all the problems. You
    > have to restore all your data backups, you have to reinstall all
    > your programs, you have to reinstall all the Windows and
    > application updates,you have to locate and install all the needed
    > drivers for your system, you have to recustomize Windows and all
    > your apps to work the way you're comfortable with.
    >
    > Besides all those things being time-consuming and troublesome,
    > you may have trouble with some of them: can you find all your
    > application CDs? Can you find all the needed installation codes?
    > Do you have data backups to restore? Do you even remember all the
    > customizations and tweaks you may have installed to make
    > everything work the way you like?

    Most people are happy with the defaults and just want
    things to work without a hassle.

    >
    > Occasionally there are problems that are so difficult to solve
    > that Windows should be reinstalled cleanly. But they are few and
    > far between; reinstallation should not be a substitute for
    > troubleshooting; it should be a last resort, to be done only
    > after all other attempts at troubleshooting by a qualified person
    > have failed.

    Your average tech will just clean up the hard drive, maybe
    the registry, and then run some antivirus and antispyware
    utilities. Anything beyond that by a more serious tech
    will likely be cost prohibitive considering the cost of new
    PC's these days.

    >
    > If you have problems, post them here; it's likely that someone
    > can help you and a reinstallation won't be required.
    >

    Nowadays, anyone who contemplates reformatting the hard
    drive is doing so because of a huge slew of issues.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Default User wrote:

    > "Thief_" <thief_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:OW0dHQbvFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >
    >> I want to re-install WindowsXP Pro on my notebook but don't have a
    >> floppy disk, so how do I fdisk the hard disk?
    >>
    >> Regards
    >>
    >> Thief_
    >>
    >
    >
    > The XP installation disk will allow you to format, create partitions or
    > resize existing partitions.
    >
    > Ronnie Vernon
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows Shell/User

    What? The XP CD has no means of resizing partitions.

    Steve
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    BC wrote:
    >
    > I wouldn't use NTFS these days -- whatever theoretical
    > superiority it may have to FAT32 is largely besides the
    > point to being able to easily backup and recover from a
    > serious Windows problem or infection.
    >

    How does the file system effect the backing up of data?
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Ken Blake wrote:
    > However why do you want to reformat and reinstall? In my view,
    > it's usually a mistake. With a modicum of care, it should never
    > be necessary to reinstall Windows (XP or any other version). I've
    > run Windows 3.0, 3.1, WFWG 3.11, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows
    > 2000, and Windows XP, each for the period of time before the next
    > version came out, and each on two machines here. I never
    > reinstalled any of them, and I have never had anything more than
    > an occasional minor problem.
    >
    > It's my belief that this mistaken notion stems from the technical
    > support people at many of the larger OEMs. Their solution to
    > almost any problem they don't quickly know the answer to is
    > "reformat and reinstall." That's the perfect solution for them.
    > It gets you off the phone quickly, it almost always works, and it
    > doesn't require them to do any real troubleshooting (a skill that
    > most of them obviously don't possess in any great degree).

    I agree with what you say here. I would just like to point out that
    trying out new applications DID cause a lot of problems on Windows
    95/98/ME. The system often became unstable and refused to start up
    properly just because one installed/uninstalled a couple of software
    packages.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Jonas Islander wrote:

    > Ken Blake wrote:
    >
    >> However why do you want to reformat and reinstall? In my view, it's
    >> usually a mistake. With a modicum of care, it should never be
    >> necessary to reinstall Windows (XP or any other version). I've run
    >> Windows 3.0, 3.1, WFWG 3.11, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, and
    >> Windows XP, each for the period of time before the next version came
    >> out, and each on two machines here. I never reinstalled any of them,
    >> and I have never had anything more than an occasional minor problem.
    >>
    >> It's my belief that this mistaken notion stems from the technical
    >> support people at many of the larger OEMs. Their solution to almost
    >> any problem they don't quickly know the answer to is "reformat and
    >> reinstall." That's the perfect solution for them. It gets you off the
    >> phone quickly, it almost always works, and it doesn't require them to
    >> do any real troubleshooting (a skill that most of them obviously don't
    >> possess in any great degree).
    >
    >
    > I agree with what you say here. I would just like to point out that
    > trying out new applications DID cause a lot of problems on Windows
    > 95/98/ME. The system often became unstable and refused to start up
    > properly just because one installed/uninstalled a couple of software
    > packages.

    IME, usually by the installs replacing .dll files used by the system
    with thier own versions.

    Steve
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