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Peltier Cooling

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June 30, 2004 8:45:44 PM

I see almost all cooling methods these days revolve around water (or liquid) cooling and more case fans. It seems that hardly anybody speaks of peltier cooling these days. Can anybody tell me why? I am not opposed to water cooling, but am thinking of peltier cooling due to it's compact size and relative ease of installation. Do people shy away from it due to high cost, maintenance, fear of the unknown, sunspots?? Inquiring minds (well at least one) want to know.

Thanks!



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More about : peltier cooling

June 30, 2004 8:58:00 PM

So basically they are inefficient then. We just got some peltiers in at work to stablize temperatures inside a mass spectrometer and they seem to work well (at least inside the lab).That made me think of putting them in a case for cooling. Thanks for the input.

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July 1, 2004 12:30:09 AM

Condensation is also a problem with peilter coolers.

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July 1, 2004 1:55:49 AM

First of all, it's hard to find a peltier that's powerfull enough to cool modern CPU's without being under high stress. And high stress increases the likelyhood that it will fail. When Peltiers fail, they can turn into high-powered resistors that burn your core and melt your CPU socket!

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July 1, 2004 2:24:02 AM

...which is BAD

My dick is so big, that my dick has a dick. And my dicks' dick is bigger than yours.
July 1, 2004 3:25:51 AM

there is no "stress" for a peltier really. No matter what its always going to be moving X watts of heat at a certain temperature, it really doesnt matter how much heat the proceessor is putting out the amount of heat that is traveling through the peltiers plates will always stay constant. So the only way to put the peltier into a situation of failure is to have a lot of condensation around an un-potted peltier or let the peltier heat up over 90c, at that temperature the solder holding the semiconductors to the plates will start melting.

If it isn't a P6 then it isn't a processor
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July 1, 2004 5:34:27 AM

If the cold side gets too hot you'll damage it. If the hot side gets too hot you'll damage it. If a peltier can't keep up it will overheat!

We had a user in here with a PIII 500E overclocked to 1000MHz at 200MHz bus (using the i815E and RAM at 3/4 bus speed). His failed and burned everything.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
July 1, 2004 7:38:24 PM

Hmm. I am still interested in doing it. Perhaps when I am ready to upgrade everything (MOBO, CPU, RAM) I will give it a shot and OC till it goes into meltdown. Maybe I can videotape it or something or at least take pics.

I have thought about the condenstation effects and was wonderihng if using a conformal coating would save the surrounding electronics if it happened. I live in AZ where it is very hot and dry during the summer and cold and dry during the winter. Just using the fans alone (and I run 4) I see a 10+º C difference in CPU temps sometimes. Of course my ex girlfriend didn't believe in running the heat or A/C to save money on electricity. :-)

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July 1, 2004 11:26:45 PM

Wow, you poor folks. Here in Michigan it gets too hot to skip on the AC. And of course too cold to skip on the heat. I have NATURAL GAS heat, and am considering natural gas for the AC as well. That should screw with some people's minds if I go to natural gas AC!

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July 2, 2004 7:31:45 AM

Not my mind.
So you going with ammonia or lithium bromide?
I suppose lithium bromide would be safer for a small residental use absorption system.
Although the only absorption systems I have seen in use were all industrial application over 500 ton capacity.

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July 2, 2004 8:00:17 AM

Nothing that complicated, I was simply thinking of powering a refrigeration unit from a small natural gas internal combustion engine.

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<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
July 2, 2004 7:23:35 PM

Any recommendations on a dialectric grease? I just got pentium 3 600MHz processor with a Spot Thermdynamics triple fan mod (went out of business several years ago) froma buddy at work. I am going to put it into an old Compaq case and give it hell. It is the 90º board style that Compaq used for a while. Can't remember what they call those. Any tips on accurately benchmarking overclocks would be great.

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July 3, 2004 12:22:03 AM

are you saying you put dielectric on the cpu pins????

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July 3, 2004 8:37:12 PM

Quote:
First of all, it's hard to find a peltier that's powerfull enough to cool modern CPU's without being under high stress. And high stress increases the likelyhood that it will fail. When Peltiers fail, they can turn into high-powered resistors that burn your core and melt your CPU socket!

This is the part about peltiers I don't really understand.
A peltier creats a delta between the temps of the different sides, the more watts the peltier gets, the larger the delta, right? So, is the delta constant in all temps/CPU heat dissipations? If so, why not install a weak peltier just to cool CPUs to room temp?

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July 3, 2004 8:50:54 PM

Peltiers can only pass a certain amount of heat from one side to the other. If a Peltier can only pass 35W, and your CPU puts out 70W, the "cold" side will get hotter and hotter until something fails.

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