When did pins go from a dime to a quarter per play?

Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

Just curious... someone was talking about 10 cent games earlier and
I got to wondering... I assume maybe early 70's

/Tim
23 answers Last reply
More about when pins dime quarter play
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    can't answer your question, but chew on this:
    1975 pinball was .25 to play.
    Adjusted for inflation to 2005 that would equal .94

    no wonder pinball isn't making money anymore at .50 a play.

    in 1990 an average pinball was .50 to play. Adjusted for inflation to 2005
    would be .74

    So $1 a game REALLY isn't out of line, is it??

    and you really can't argue with my numbers. they came from
    http://www.westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi

    Dan

    That game of .25 pacman back in 1980 would cost .63 today.
    "Tim Iskander" <tiskande@_no_twcny.s-p-a-mrr.com> wrote in message
    news:ACuOe.27699$Hx4.23209@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
    > Just curious... someone was talking about 10 cent games earlier and
    > I got to wondering... I assume maybe early 70's
    >
    > /Tim
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Right about late 1960's you'd be seeing two or three games for a quarter and
    the dime play disappearing. By early 70's the dime play was gone, at least
    on new games. LTG :)

    "Tim Iskander" <tiskande@_no_twcny.s-p-a-mrr.com> wrote in message
    news:ACuOe.27699$Hx4.23209@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
    > Just curious... someone was talking about 10 cent games earlier and
    > I got to wondering... I assume maybe early 70's
    >
    > /Tim
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    i have had machines as late as 68 that took dimes, but my 70 expressway
    is a quater only machine. figure the swirch took place around then.

    Ctsteps5

    owner of
    71 Bally Expressway, 72 Williams Superstar,
    74 Williams Star Pool, 75 Gottlieb Fast Draw.
    68 Williams Student Prince

    Moderator of EM Pinball Group
    http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/empinbalmachines/
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    I don't know the exact time either but they didn't jump at one time
    from one dime to one quarter. In the 60s basically it was a dime a
    play, 3 plays for a quarter. Then around 1970 they got rid of dimes and
    took quarters but it was 2 games for a quarter. Then somewhere in the
    late 70s it jumped to one quarter for one play. These were basically
    all 5 balls per game at this time. The next jump was a quarter a game
    and 3 balls a game, then came our basic 50 cents a game at 3 balls. So
    we've gone from 15 balls for a quarter to 3 balls for 50 cents, or an
    easier way to figure 30 balls for 50 cents to 3 balls for 50 cents, so
    10 times less balls for the same money. Balls went quick on those old
    games though.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    >I assume maybe early 70's

    Games were also adjustable which was nice for locations I grew up in.
    The bars in rural areas needed more bang for the buck, so you got more
    plays longer. Sooner or later it was 5 balls for a Q.

    The op I talk to went to 1p for a Q in the mid to late 70's and that
    was made easier with the jump to electronic games. It was too bad that
    a lot of EMs were ignored when digital games hit the street (a lot of
    my late 70's EMs are in great shape)

    Kirb
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Actually here in Olympia, Washington around 1972 there were still
    plenty of new 10 cents/3 for 25 cents pinballs around here. Once in a
    while there'd be a brand new one that came from the factory with dual 2
    for a quarter chutes. Around 1979 we started seeing 1 for a quarter/3
    for 2 quarters chutes.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    i agree $1.00 is not out of the question. look at how much it costs to
    play some newer vids.
    but honestly-
    you can not use the inflation adjustment on everything thow. just like
    they are trying to justify high gas prices to that aspect. its just an
    excuse. the truth is the more oil companies keep merging and buying
    others out, the more monopoly they have and can charge what they want
    until its regulated. and yes, price gauging still exists at the pump
    right now (not just bcuz oil prices are high).
    when ever the stock exchange rings the bell and oil barrel price is up,
    they (gas stations) instantly all raise their prices at the pump. but
    if it falls at the bell ring, they do not instantly drop price per
    gallon. in other words, even if they have their current stock of gas on
    hand that they purchased at x amount of dollars per barrel, they
    increase their current gas price as if they paid the new higher amount
    per barrel.
    sorry guys, i know its pinball, but the gas & oil b.s. needs to be
    stopped now. just try to heat your home this winter "reasonably". too
    bad kerry wasnt elected heh? the extreme profit money is going into
    someones pockets---- hmmmmmm? i wonder who? how about the guy who
    suposedly sold his oil "biz".
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    using that same logic, a NIB MM in 1997 was roughly $3200.
    So if you kept it and sold it now for the same "money" it would be worth
    $3771.

    Anyone have one for sale?
    Dan

    "DWGoett" <pinball@midamerica.net> wrote in message
    news:lJuOe.8596$ih4.637@fe02.lga...
    > can't answer your question, but chew on this:
    > 1975 pinball was .25 to play.
    > Adjusted for inflation to 2005 that would equal .94
    >
    > no wonder pinball isn't making money anymore at .50 a play.
    >
    > in 1990 an average pinball was .50 to play. Adjusted for inflation to
    > 2005 would be .74
    >
    > So $1 a game REALLY isn't out of line, is it??
    >
    > and you really can't argue with my numbers. they came from
    > http://www.westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi
    >
    > Dan
    >
    > That game of .25 pacman back in 1980 would cost .63 today.
    > "Tim Iskander" <tiskande@_no_twcny.s-p-a-mrr.com> wrote in message
    > news:ACuOe.27699$Hx4.23209@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
    >> Just curious... someone was talking about 10 cent games earlier and
    >> I got to wondering... I assume maybe early 70's
    >>
    >> /Tim
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Pricing thoughts aren't out of line. Problem on location is you have to give
    a couple dollars worth of fun to attract players for dollar play, and pins
    have trouble attracting players at 50 ¢ play which is a bargain when you
    consider how much cost of equipment and up keep has risen in the last 25
    years. LTG :)

    "DWGoett" <pinball@midamerica.net> wrote in message
    news:lJuOe.8596$ih4.637@fe02.lga...

    > So $1 a game REALLY isn't out of line, is it??
    >
    > and you really can't argue with my numbers. they came from
    > http://www.westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi
    >
    > Dan
  10. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    When I started dumping my paper route money into pins, they were 10
    cents a play or 3 plays for a quarter. That was about 1966. There were a
    few older games around, usually the ones with a manual ball lift, that
    were at 5 games for 25 cents.

    bogart
    www.pinrestore.com

    Tim Iskander wrote:
    > Just curious... someone was talking about 10 cent games earlier and
    > I got to wondering... I assume maybe early 70's
    >
    > /Tim
  11. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    > When I started dumping my paper route money into pins, they were 10
    > cents a play or 3 plays for a quarter.

    i remember that well into the 70's. But I think 75 on it was 2 plays for a
    quarter and dimes were history.


    There were a
    > few older games around, usually the ones with a manual ball lift, that
    > were at 5 games for 25 cents.

    those are the first games i remember. they seemed ancient even then too.
    zero maintenance of course, and rubber rings nearly broken. people would
    lay lit cigarettes on the glass by the lockdown bar and make a mess, tar
    would accumulate and never be wiped off. guys would put their nickels line
    up all the way to the back glass. flippin and smokin.


    --
    billb
  12. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    In article <ACuOe.27699$Hx4.23209@twister.nyroc.rr.com>,
    Tim Iskander <tiskande@_no_twcny.s-p-a-mrr.com> wrote:
    >Just curious... someone was talking about 10 cent games earlier and
    >I got to wondering... I assume maybe early 70's
    >
    >/Tim

    It varied by region. Urban areas usually increase the price before rural
    areas. (I know, gross generalization....) I think add-a-balls stayed at
    a dime longer because it was simpler: the game didn't need a credit unit
    for any other reason (no credit/replay awards), so 1 coin/1 play saves
    some parts.

    In New England, the distributors tried to "encourage" price changes as
    much as they could without breaking price-fixing laws. They used long
    flippers as the justification for the move from a dime to 2-for-a-quarter
    (or "quaddah" as many New Englanders call it). Later, solid state was the
    justification for 1-for-a-quarter pricing.
    --
    .................David Marston at MV
  13. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    i'm happy-talky-talking tina, here's your extra ball wrote:
    > i agree $1.00 is not out of the question. look at how much it costs to
    > play some newer vids.
    > but honestly-
    > you can not use the inflation adjustment on everything thow. just like
    > they are trying to justify high gas prices to that aspect. its just an
    > excuse. the truth is the more oil companies keep merging and buying
    > others out, the more monopoly they have and can charge what they want
    > until its regulated. and yes, price gauging still exists at the pump
    > right now (not just bcuz oil prices are high).
    > when ever the stock exchange rings the bell and oil barrel price is up,
    > they (gas stations) instantly all raise their prices at the pump. but
    > if it falls at the bell ring, they do not instantly drop price per
    > gallon. in other words, even if they have their current stock of gas on
    > hand that they purchased at x amount of dollars per barrel, they
    > increase their current gas price as if they paid the new higher amount
    > per barrel.
    > sorry guys, i know its pinball, but the gas & oil b.s. needs to be
    > stopped now. just try to heat your home this winter "reasonably". too
    > bad kerry wasnt elected heh? the extreme profit money is going into
    > someones pockets---- hmmmmmm? i wonder who? how about the guy who
    > suposedly sold his oil "biz".

    I can't agree more. Like a bunch of sheep we just take this. Instead of
    billions into a ridiculous war, this is where the billions should be
    spent.
    http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050814/ap_on_hi_te/hybrid_tinkerers


    But oh no, we couldn't do that to the oil companies or the Saudi's.
    They're watching out for our best interest. When are we going to wake
    up and force this issue.
  14. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    I've got a nice, original Big Shot (1973) that is set up 3 plays for a
    quarter and 1 play for a dime. It even has a nickel slot... which I
    think is really cool... so you could use 2 nickels instead of a dime.

    So there was at least one machine in the early/mid 70's that could
    still be played for a dime.
  15. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Next question, when did they go up to $75 per game. My local arcade had
    Elvis that high. Here come the bill collectors on the coin doors.
  16. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    As a kid in the 70's there were always 2 pins in rotation at the local
    5 & dime. The cost was 2 games for 10 cents..... of course on those
    old EM's 10 balls took about 10 minutes to all drain! Consider this;
    even though a pin play now costs 50 cents and you only get 3 balls, the
    average player can quite easily play more than 10 minutes on a modern
    Stern (with any luck). Ok, the math is funny and involves tons of
    variables, but I still find it interesting.
    Terry.
  17. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    The op I talk to went to 1p for a Q in the mid to late 70's

    Yep, that's true - I had to hold it after that until we hit 1980. God,
    I was never so happy to usher in a new decade. Now I can have 1p an
    hour, depending how much I drink. ;)

    - Q
  18. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Seems like I remember playing Bally EIGHT BALL in 1978 for 2 games (5
    balls each) for 25 cents.

    Next game 2 games (3 balls each) for 25 cents.

    Next the jump went to 1 game (5 balls) for 25 cents.

    Finally, in 1980, with the release of Williams BLACK KNIGHT, I saw 1
    game (3 balls) for 25 cents.

    So in 2 years, there was quite a reduction in the number of balls for
    25 cents (10 balls downto 3).

    I can't remember with what game and when prices jumped to 50 cents per
    game (3 balls or 5 balls).

    Later
  19. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    My Flash game (1979) was right on the edge of 2/quarter and 1/quarter
    play.

    Its factory default setting was to give 1 game/1 quarter and 3 games/2
    quarters.

    On location, I never did see this, though. It was always 1 game/1
    quarter, no discount. (Probably because Flash was such a breakthrough
    game at the time!)

    5 balls/game, of course.

    I didn't see 3-ball pinball settings until just after the videogame
    crash, when Williams rebooted the pinball industry with some daring new
    designs. Space Shuttle and High Speed. Those "new" games set the
    standard for 3-ball, ever since.

    Later on, we see Williams trying to push 50 cents/game with Elvira and
    then BK2K. BK2K was partially successful because it was a throwback to
    5 balls/game, reason being to gently introduce a new price increase,
    and make it more palatable to players.

    In my experience, 50 cents/game didn't truly become the standard until
    T2. That game was another huge breakthrough game (first good pinball
    machine with DMD, etc.). From that point on, pinball was almost always
    50 cents/game, and some operators even changed the settings on older
    games to make them 50 cents/game also!

    Now, at least in the San Francisco area, 75 cents/game is becoming
    standard. With all the driving that route operators do, to collect and
    fix games, the high gas prices are trickling down even to pinball.
    LOTR was the first machine to really see 75 cents/game, because it's
    such a good game that people want to play it a lot. It's hard to find
    a 50-cent LOTR around here.

    In high-profile arcades in San Francisco, the cost is $1/play, and
    something amazing: the machines get played at this price... a lot! I
    often see players playing machines at the Lowe's Theatres arcade on the
    third floor of the Metreon (not to be confused with Sony's own Metreon
    arcade on the second floor, which has no pins). I think part of the
    reason the games are played a lot at $1/play is because operator tries
    to keep them in very good condition :)

    Josh
  20. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    They haven't here. LTG :)

    "Hooked" <robertcampbell2@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1124807664.865158.145040@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > Next question, when did they go up to $75 per game. My local arcade had
    > Elvis that high. Here come the bill collectors on the coin doors.
    >
  21. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Black Knight when I uncrated it was my first 50¢ pin set that way from the
    factory. LTG :)

    "Krellan" <krellan@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1124830706.765146.86530@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > My Flash game (1979) was right on the edge of 2/quarter and 1/quarter
    > play.
    >
    > Its factory default setting was to give 1 game/1 quarter and 3 games/2
    > quarters.
    >
    > On location, I never did see this, though. It was always 1 game/1
    > quarter, no discount. (Probably because Flash was such a breakthrough
    > game at the time!)
    >
    > 5 balls/game, of course.
    >
    > I didn't see 3-ball pinball settings until just after the videogame
    > crash, when Williams rebooted the pinball industry with some daring new
    > designs. Space Shuttle and High Speed. Those "new" games set the
    > standard for 3-ball, ever since.
    >
    > Later on, we see Williams trying to push 50 cents/game with Elvira and
    > then BK2K. BK2K was partially successful because it was a throwback to
    > 5 balls/game, reason being to gently introduce a new price increase,
    > and make it more palatable to players.
    >
    > In my experience, 50 cents/game didn't truly become the standard until
    > T2. That game was another huge breakthrough game (first good pinball
    > machine with DMD, etc.). From that point on, pinball was almost always
    > 50 cents/game, and some operators even changed the settings on older
    > games to make them 50 cents/game also!
    >
    > Now, at least in the San Francisco area, 75 cents/game is becoming
    > standard. With all the driving that route operators do, to collect and
    > fix games, the high gas prices are trickling down even to pinball.
    > LOTR was the first machine to really see 75 cents/game, because it's
    > such a good game that people want to play it a lot. It's hard to find
    > a 50-cent LOTR around here.
    >
    > In high-profile arcades in San Francisco, the cost is $1/play, and
    > something amazing: the machines get played at this price... a lot! I
    > often see players playing machines at the Lowe's Theatres arcade on the
    > third floor of the Metreon (not to be confused with Sony's own Metreon
    > arcade on the second floor, which has no pins). I think part of the
    > reason the games are played a lot at $1/play is because operator tries
    > to keep them in very good condition :)
    >
    > Josh
    >
  22. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    I agree with your last paragraph in it's entirety. However, you want to
    look at this solution as "Bullshit"? Should we just be complacent and
    continue down the road we are on? Should we just continue shaking our
    head everytime we go to the pump?

    This is not a left or right or "tree hugger" issue. Maybe the answer
    is not there now with electricity, but look at what the hybrids are
    doing for Toyota and look at what a few engineers on their own have
    accomplished. It is a supplement. This is at least something in the
    right direction for right now. I say let's put our American engineers
    into this with billions in R&D and I believe you would be suprised what
    they will come up with. It will be their ingenuity that will eventually
    find the answer. These are people who need the funding.

    I'll agree with your solar power or fuel cells or hydrogen, but this is
    something we could do right now to get better mileage.

    The R&D being done now is a joke. A total facade.
  23. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    as much as i hate price gouging, it's good that the games are played a
    dollar a throw.

    especially if that makes for good maintenance.

    --
    billb
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