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478 3.4e available?

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September 4, 2004 1:21:34 PM

Hi all,
I've been searching high and low for a reasonably priced 3.4e for a socket 478. The price drop last month from intel was to $278, so it should definitely be available for under $300. Yet almost noone has it, and those that do are selling it for $400-$600+.
Checked the usual channels:p ricescan,bizrate,zipzoomfly,newegg,pricegrabber,even did a search on the part number. Pricewatch had one link at compuplus, but when you got to the site it was a 775. Anyone got a source for this chip at a reasonable price? Checked with intel directly. Not discontinued. Checked with their premiere partners in my area. Either not in stock, not selling seperate parts or not willing to order it. HELP!

Hardware

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September 4, 2004 1:42:04 PM
September 4, 2004 1:57:39 PM

Rich,
Thanks for the quick reply.
I do appreciate the research that you have done, but the actual 3.4E has the 1mb cache.
The specific part # is BX80546PG3400E.
I guess I should have posted that the first time.
I did check all the sites you listed.
One had it available for about $400.
The rest were actually the 512k cache.
Thanks for the effort anyway.

Hardware
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September 4, 2004 2:24:45 PM

Get the 3.4c. It's a faster chip. don't pay attention to the cache. The reason why the precot core needs twice the cache is too make up for the longer pipelines. Check out some benchmarks comparing the 3.4e to the 3.4c and you'll see for yourself. Plus the 3.4c runs alot cooler.

Watch out for the <b><font color=red>bloody</font color=red></b> Fanboys!

AMD64 2800+ :: MSI Neo-Fis2r :: 512mb Kingmax ddr400 :: Sapphire 9800pro 128mb :: 10K WD Raptor

Addicted, finally.
September 4, 2004 2:38:47 PM

Or the P4 Prescott @ 3.2Ghz...Which is widely available and costs less than the Northwood.
It also can be overclocked to 3.4 quite easily with stock cooling.

========================
Try everything...
Do not be afraid of failure, for this is how we learn and grow...
Live life to the fullest...
Do not regret what you have not done!!!
September 4, 2004 2:50:12 PM

Donnie, can you point me to the CvsE comparison?
Rich, OCing is something I have in the past avoided.
Is there a specific article you can point me to on OCing the 3.2?
September 4, 2004 3:18:14 PM

<A HREF="http://www.tomshardware.com/cpu/20040322/prescott-16.ht..." target="_new">here</A>
The 3.4c wins in just about every benchmark besides synthetic benchmarks. Which mean about d*ck. I would personal choose the 3.4c over the 3.4e because the the huge temp differences. The 3.4e is like an oven in your case. I like nice cool case temps. Makes a man feel good :wink: With the 3.4e your gonna be looking at temps underload above the 60c mark easily.
But I wouldn't buy a 3.4ghz p4 anyway. If I wanted that speed with a p4 i'd buy some pc4000 ddr and a 2.8c and o/c the hell out of it.

Watch out for the <b><font color=red>bloody</font color=red></b> Fanboys!

AMD64 2800+ :: MSI Neo-Fis2r :: 512mb Kingmax ddr400 :: Sapphire 9800pro 128mb :: 10K WD Raptor

Addicted, finally.
September 4, 2004 3:53:12 PM

Thank you for the response and link.
Looks like the 3.4c and 3.2e are both extremely viable options.

Hardware

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by hardware on 09/04/04 12:05 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
September 4, 2004 4:08:33 PM

Overclocking Prescott 2.8
http://www.legitreviews.com/Reviews/prescott_oc_1.shtml

Intel made a lot of changes to the Prescott core that will play a more prolific role within the next year. SSE3, for example, promises to augment the processor's performance through the utilization of software optimizations.

Enhancements to Hyper-Threading should improve multi-threaded performance. And of course, the technological improvements to Intel's 90nm manufacturing process will enable a 4GHz variant of the Pentium 4 by the end of 2004…

Prescott should be a marvelous platform for overclocking, given its newfound scalability. Enthusiasts will want to have a go at the less expensive Prescott processors with the promise of lofty gains.

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/myrig.php?do=view...

I am running my Prescott 3.2 on GigaByte GA-8KNXP Ultra-64 board with a 206mhz FSB realizing performance of a very fast 3.3, a small bump, but I am keeping my memory at timings of 2-2-2-5 also. And no temp increase noticed.

========================
Try everything...
Do not be afraid of failure, for this is how we learn and grow...
Live life to the fullest...
Do not regret what you have not done!!!
September 4, 2004 4:43:27 PM

Welcome to the Forum Hardware.
September 4, 2004 6:58:45 PM

dont get a northwood the truth is although the prescott does run hotter it also takes heat better just get yourself the 3.2e or wait also get the Zalman CNPS 7000A-Cu big copper heatsing also the prescott doesnt need a lot of voltage to be overclocked like the northwood

System Spec:
Asus P4c800-E
3.2e @3.8ghz
2X512 corsair xms pro 2-2-2-5
all in wonder 9800 pro
74gb raptor
audigy 2zs
klipsch ultra
September 4, 2004 9:30:34 PM

Yeah, but can his graphics card take the extra heat?? There's more in a computer than a processor.

The reason why voltages are so low is because they HAVE to be to maintain a relatively low TDP. Imagine a 3.0E @ 1.55V (and the ensuing heat), then think about the upcoming 3.8E and 4.0E and the rediculous amount of heat they make at a lower voltage. Northwoods can take 1.675v no sweat for a long period of time OCed. Typically 1.725v and above is where you need watercooling or better. Moreover, if he gets an M0 stepping Northwood, he can easily OC the sh!t out of it on air and still keep everything copacetic in his case.

Maxtor disgraces the six letters that make Matrox.
September 5, 2004 2:13:05 AM

Are you an Intel sales rep, or just not too bright.
1 SSE3 is an amalgum of patches, for slight glitches in SSE2 and HT. It wont help, because the extra time taken to load, will be longer than the glitches they fix.
2 The extra cache, is an attempt to keep scotty cooler. However, where the cache is actually usfull, it has the opposite effect.
3 Even when the cache is overheating the vregs, it does not offer a real perf boost over the P4c.
4 If all you can do, is give bad advice, leave, and dont come back.
September 5, 2004 3:13:22 AM

Points two and three are wrong.
You are the one giving bad advice.
I don't expect you to believe me so go ask an electrical engineer who specializes in asic design why Prescot is so hot.

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September 5, 2004 6:12:32 AM

Of course anyone who would recommend the slower Prescott over the faster Northwood would also recommend the warmer 7000A-CU over the cooler AlCu version. That's right, the ONLY head to head comparison I've read showed the combination Aluminum/Copper sink cooled better than the all copper version. It also weighs less and cost less. In fact the only reason they make the inferior all copper version is that people who don't know any better prefer it.

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September 5, 2004 6:34:23 AM

Do you understand leakage current? Can you explain why it is more previlant ina cct that is changing state? Can you tell me why it is that transistor orientation is so critical? One of us may not know what they are talking about, but it's not me.
As to item 3 being wrong, not according to the benches I,ve seen. Show me.
September 5, 2004 6:51:29 PM

You can answer your own questions by learning how a simple semiconductor functions and how it is manufactured.


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