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New 8400 What's so special?

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  • Dell
  • DDR2
  • Memory
  • Computers
Last response: in Computer Brands
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Anonymous
a b } Memory
June 28, 2004 5:14:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

What are the practical benefits of the new 8400 over the 9300?
Hyperthreading and DDR2 memory - hype (threading or otherwise) or are the
real benefits?

More about : 8400 special

Anonymous
a b } Memory
June 28, 2004 6:14:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

From the articles about the 8400 that I have seen, the consensus is that
until the new software becomes widely available, the only compelling reason
to buy now is to have the latest, greatest, etc.

"Lenny Bruce" <spamme@devnul.com> wrote in message
news:iZedne7KrLmx4X3dRVn-iQ@adelphia.com...
> What are the practical benefits of the new 8400 over the 9300?
> Hyperthreading and DDR2 memory - hype (threading or otherwise) or are the
> real benefits?
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
June 29, 2004 1:45:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Hyperthreading is already available. The system does have the advantage of
using the newer format P4 (Socket-775), so future upgrades will be possible;
we've likely seen the last Socket478 CPU, so unless PowerLeap works its
magic in the future, the road ends at 3.4 GHz for the P4/478 and 8300.

Eerily, though it uses the new LGA775 P4, the new 8400 has elements of the
8100 -- i.e., it doesn't fully implement the new technology - such as BTX-
which is coming soon to the P4.

The 8400 is a bit more future proof than the 8300 -- and you'll pay up front
for that.



"Lenny Bruce" <spamme@devnul.com> wrote in message
news:iZedne7KrLmx4X3dRVn-iQ@adelphia.com...
> What are the practical benefits of the new 8400 over the 9300?
> Hyperthreading and DDR2 memory - hype (threading or otherwise) or are the
> real benefits?
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b } Memory
June 29, 2004 1:45:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
news:zj0Ec.8972$Pt.2318@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
> Hyperthreading is already available. The system does have the advantage
> of
> using the newer format P4 (Socket-775), so future upgrades will be
> possible;
> we've likely seen the last Socket478 CPU, so unless PowerLeap works its
> magic in the future, the road ends at 3.4 GHz for the P4/478 and 8300.
>
> Eerily, though it uses the new LGA775 P4, the new 8400 has elements of the
> 8100 -- i.e., it doesn't fully implement the new technology - such as BTX-
> which is coming soon to the P4.
>
> The 8400 is a bit more future proof than the 8300 -- and you'll pay up
> front
> for that.
>
>

<snip>

I agree with much of Edward's assessment. No BTX. A somewhat perplexing
CPU/CPU socket design that will make processor removal and reseats either an
adventure or disaster, since the exposed pins have been eliminated from the
CPU but are now there - just begging to be damaged - in the vacant socket.

http://www.sharkyextreme.com/hardware/cpu/article.php/3...

Indeed. Intel certainly appeared to be commited to the 423-pin P4 as well as
RDRAM...at the time.


Stew
Anonymous
a b } Memory
June 29, 2004 5:02:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote in message
news:Un4Ec.120$Zl3.80@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> I agree with much of Edward's assessment. No BTX. A somewhat perplexing
> CPU/CPU socket design that will make processor removal and reseats either
an
> adventure or disaster, since the exposed pins have been eliminated from
the
> CPU but are now there - just begging to be damaged - in the vacant socket.
>
> http://www.sharkyextreme.com/hardware/cpu/article.php/3...

Which is good for Intel. If you damage pins on a CPU you send it back to
Intel, but if you damage the pins on the board, you send it to the board
manufacturer ;o)

Gary (the cynic!)

--
'red sky at night, the city's alight'
- Terry Pratchett, Equal Rites
http://www.garypigott.net
Anonymous
a b } Memory
June 29, 2004 5:02:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Gary Pigott" <usenet@garypigott.net> wrote in message
news:2kd42uFr12eU1@uni-berlin.de...
> "S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:Un4Ec.120$Zl3.80@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
>> I agree with much of Edward's assessment. No BTX. A somewhat perplexing
>> CPU/CPU socket design that will make processor removal and reseats either
> an
>> adventure or disaster, since the exposed pins have been eliminated from
> the
>> CPU but are now there - just begging to be damaged - in the vacant
>> socket.
>>
>> http://www.sharkyextreme.com/hardware/cpu/article.php/3...
>
> Which is good for Intel. If you damage pins on a CPU you send it back to
> Intel, but if you damage the pins on the board, you send it to the board
> manufacturer ;o)
>
> Gary (the cynic!)
>
> --
> 'red sky at night, the city's alight'
> - Terry Pratchett, Equal Rites
> http://www.garypigott.net
>
>


Absolutely correct. An RMA boon for Intel (I read of an estimated 25% bent
processor pin return) and a hellish nightmare for system board
manufacturers - and for OEM PC makers who have customers troubleshoot on the
phone.

Other than enthusiasts, there won't be a need to go to the socket often, but
still....


Stew
!