Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Dell reinstall CD - can do repair of WinXP?

Last response: in Computer Brands
Share
June 28, 2004 8:19:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Been having problems with IE and Windows Explorer, wondering if I
should do a repair install of WinXP. I have a Dell reinstallation CD
(WinXP Home including service pack 1), not sure whether it has that
capability. Hate to mess things up, since all other programs are
working ok, and even IE and Windows Explorer work ok most of the time,
especially after a
reboot.

…Click on a link, IE freezes for about 20 seconds, then get message
that it needs to close. Click on Close, it doesn’t close, works
normally from then on.

…Right-click link, Open in new window, nothing happens. Left-click
link, open in same window, works normally.

…After closing, IE will not re-start. Double-click IE icon, get
message it needs to close, will not open. After reboot, works
normally.

When I click on Details in the Close dialog, it always referes to code
oxc0000005.

....Windows Explorer occasionally fails to open, normal after reboot.

I’ve run Spybot and AdAware, along with antivirus programs, nothing
comes up except a few cookies. All other programs are working
normally.

Any ideas? Thanks!
Anonymous
June 28, 2004 11:43:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Steve" <hft@wpr.inv> wrote in message
news:p n91e0l7d4g9000aci55rjgutsja5bpvfq@4ax.com...
> Been having problems with IE and Windows Explorer, wondering if I
> should do a repair install of WinXP.

Since your problems all seem to be with Internet Explorer you might find
this MSKB article helpful.

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=318378

--
D

I'm not an MVP a VIP nor do I have ESP.
I was just trying to help.
Please use your own best judgment before implementing any suggestions or
advice herein.
No warranty is expressed or implied.
Your mileage may vary.
See store for details. :) 

Remove shoes to E-mail.
Anonymous
June 29, 2004 4:48:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

If repairing IE does not solve the problem, you can try a repair reinstall
of XP using the Dell supplied CD.

"Steve" <hft@wpr.inv> wrote in message
news:p n91e0l7d4g9000aci55rjgutsja5bpvfq@4ax.com...
> Been having problems with IE and Windows Explorer, wondering if I
> should do a repair install of WinXP. I have a Dell reinstallation CD
> (WinXP Home including service pack 1), not sure whether it has that
> capability. Hate to mess things up, since all other programs are
> working ok, and even IE and Windows Explorer work ok most of the time,
> especially after a
> reboot.
>
> .Click on a link, IE freezes for about 20 seconds, then get message
> that it needs to close. Click on Close, it doesn't close, works
> normally from then on.
>
> .Right-click link, Open in new window, nothing happens. Left-click
> link, open in same window, works normally.
>
> .After closing, IE will not re-start. Double-click IE icon, get
> message it needs to close, will not open. After reboot, works
> normally.
>
> When I click on Details in the Close dialog, it always referes to code
> oxc0000005.
>
> ...Windows Explorer occasionally fails to open, normal after reboot.
>
> I've run Spybot and AdAware, along with antivirus programs, nothing
> comes up except a few cookies. All other programs are working
> normally.
>
> Any ideas? Thanks!
>
Related resources
June 29, 2004 4:48:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"WSZsr" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:
>If repairing IE does not solve the problem, you can try a repair reinstall
>of XP using the Dell supplied CD.

Thanks. The Dell CD doesn't appear to have any option for repair,
only upgrade or new installation. Use the upgrade option?
Anonymous
June 29, 2004 3:42:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

no. Follow these instruction:

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm


"Steve" <hft@wpr.inv> wrote in message
news:1112e0hsr6vpk3b5b7e1fueduaouf5lg15@4ax.com...
> "WSZsr" <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>If repairing IE does not solve the problem, you can try a repair reinstall
>>of XP using the Dell supplied CD.
>
> Thanks. The Dell CD doesn't appear to have any option for repair,
> only upgrade or new installation. Use the upgrade option?
>
>
June 29, 2004 7:48:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

In my experience, repairs usually don't work.

Its usually quicker and easier to backup and do a complete, clean
re-install.
Anonymous
June 29, 2004 7:51:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Au contraire, mon compain: A clean install means reinstalling all your
software, reconfiguring it, updating it, solving any glitches that happen
along the way and then trying to re-create the 'look and feel' that you
like. Done correctly, repairing is much faster. The problem with a repair is
that unless the user knows what they're doing -- or at least knows how to
follow directions -- a repair can make things worse.

Rocky

"Tony" <poipoipoi@poipoipoi.com> wrote in message
news:cbs304$i4j$2@titan.btinternet.com...
> In my experience, repairs usually don't work.
>
> Its usually quicker and easier to backup and do a complete, clean
> re-install.
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
June 29, 2004 9:58:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Rocket J. Squirrel" <rocky@bullwinkle.com> wrote:

>"Tony" <poipoipoi@poipoipoi.com> wrote

>> In my experience, repairs usually don't work.
>>
>> Its usually quicker and easier to backup and do a complete, clean
>> re-install.

>Au contraire, mon compain: A clean install means reinstalling all your
>software, reconfiguring it, updating it, solving any glitches that happen
>along the way and then trying to re-create the 'look and feel' that you
>like. Done correctly, repairing is much faster. The problem with a repair is
>that unless the user knows what they're doing -- or at least knows how to
>follow directions -- a repair can make things worse.


"[R]einstalling all your software, reconfiguring it, updating
it", doesn't have to be a time-consuming hassle for you "to
re-create the 'look and feel' that you like." Yes, the basic
program install and re-download to current update status of your
apps will take time. But if a user has kept on top of things, he
knows where each app he uses stores its configuration and style
settings, and has made backup copies of those files. That can
help you get your system applications back to status quo ante mo'
ricky tik. [Which is not to say this wouldn't be a good time to
dig into those configuration setting options menus in your apps
and remind yourself of the things you can set - that you haven't
looked at in mumble-years.]

Do it on a Saturday when you've got household chores to keep you
busy while the box chugs away on CD after CD after CD, and you
won't even notice the time passing. ;-> [Real planning would
have you do it during MLB, NFL, NCAA/NBA play-off seasons when
you have double- and triple-header games available on any given
weekend day.]
--
OJ III
[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
July 10, 2004 2:47:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Another less tedious way is to make periodic "images" of your HD to either
DVDs or an external USB2 HD. Then you only need to re-install from a
previous clean image and update from there. For what it's worth I use
Acronis True Image 7.0 creating an image that is around 13 GB in about 30
minutes to the USB drive. I then disconnect the USB drive and turn it off
until the next time I make a new image or have to recover from an older one.
Recovery is done by a seeparate bootable CD which is smart enough to blast
the image from the USB drive to my 8300's HD. There are other imaging
programs out there as well: Drive Image and Ghost come to mind.

Larry
"Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:kio3e0ti0l976e37qq0b8d898gnal61ua8@4ax.com...
> "Rocket J. Squirrel" <rocky@bullwinkle.com> wrote:
>
> >"Tony" <poipoipoi@poipoipoi.com> wrote
>
> >> In my experience, repairs usually don't work.
> >>
> >> Its usually quicker and easier to backup and do a complete, clean
> >> re-install.
>
> >Au contraire, mon compain: A clean install means reinstalling all your
> >software, reconfiguring it, updating it, solving any glitches that happen
> >along the way and then trying to re-create the 'look and feel' that you
> >like. Done correctly, repairing is much faster. The problem with a repair
is
> >that unless the user knows what they're doing -- or at least knows how to
> >follow directions -- a repair can make things worse.
>
>
> "[R]einstalling all your software, reconfiguring it, updating
> it", doesn't have to be a time-consuming hassle for you "to
> re-create the 'look and feel' that you like." Yes, the basic
> program install and re-download to current update status of your
> apps will take time. But if a user has kept on top of things, he
> knows where each app he uses stores its configuration and style
> settings, and has made backup copies of those files. That can
> help you get your system applications back to status quo ante mo'
> ricky tik. [Which is not to say this wouldn't be a good time to
> dig into those configuration setting options menus in your apps
> and remind yourself of the things you can set - that you haven't
> looked at in mumble-years.]
>
> Do it on a Saturday when you've got household chores to keep you
> busy while the box chugs away on CD after CD after CD, and you
> won't even notice the time passing. ;-> [Real planning would
> have you do it during MLB, NFL, NCAA/NBA play-off seasons when
> you have double- and triple-header games available on any given
> weekend day.]
> --
> OJ III
> [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
> Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
July 11, 2004 1:10:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Larry" <me@myhome.xyz> wrote in message news:xkTHc.943$sj.377@lakeread02...
> Another less tedious way is to make periodic "images" of your HD to either
> DVDs or an external USB2 HD. Then you only need to re-install from a
> previous clean image and update from there. For what it's worth I use
> Acronis True Image 7.0 creating an image that is around 13 GB in about 30
> minutes to the USB drive. I then disconnect the USB drive and turn it off
> until the next time I make a new image or have to recover from an older
> one.
> Recovery is done by a seeparate bootable CD which is smart enough to blast
> the image from the USB drive to my 8300's HD. There are other imaging
> programs out there as well: Drive Image and Ghost come to mind.
>
> Larry

<snip>

http://store.compuapps.com/drivewizard.html



Stew
!