Installing 1990s type Tommy Gate - I need some help

Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

I recently bought a model 64 TommyGate
off Ebay. The thing is in wonderful
cosmetic condition for a lift made in
the early 1990s.

My problem is that the lift didn't come
with the original manuals and the
downloadable manuals are for more
current models. For instance, the
controls on mine have just "Up" and
"Down" switches and no LEDs or "On/Off"
switches.

I need to know what the wiring diagram
is for this older model so that I can
get things hooked up properly.

Does anybody have an owners manual for
this type TommyGate who might be willing
to let me know where a couple of the
wires go and what the switch sequence is?

Thanks.
--
Rick Swanson

Morristown, Tennessee
CARGPB6
9 answers Last reply
More about installing 1990s type tommy gate help
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Rick,
    Mine has the LEDs & one toggle switch,
    I dont know if this is the same as yours, But if it is, LMK what you
    want to see & I might can help you out .

    Take Care
    Pin-Del,
    PS, I hate using mine, Safety Switchs or not !!!, Still caint believe I
    got a finger caught in one !!
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Del wrote:

    > Rick,
    > Mine has the LEDs & one toggle switch,
    > I dont know if this is the same as yours, But if it is, LMK what you
    > want to see & I might can help you out .
    >
    > Take Care
    > Pin-Del,
    > PS, I hate using mine, Safety Switchs or not !!!, Still caint believe I
    > got a finger caught in one !!
    >

    Mine looks like this:
    http://webpages.charter.net/rswanson3354/TommyGate.jpg

    I believe that the newer models have
    their safety features integrated into
    the external switch box. I think the
    only safety mechanism on my older model
    is a remote "in cab" switch that
    provides/cuts the power to the external
    switch box.

    What I'm really trying to determine is
    if my lift is supposed to have a
    dedicated grounding cable that would run
    from the pump motor to the negative side
    of the truck battery. The lift came
    with the cable that runs from the
    positive side of the battery to the pump
    motor but no other cable. The wiring
    diagram for the newer TommyGate shows
    the dedicated grounding cable.

    Also, I don't know if I have to do
    anything other than push "up" or "down"
    to get this thing to operate. The newer
    ones you have to press the "TommyGate"
    logo on the switch box face in order to
    activate the "up" and "down" buttons.
    Actually, on the newer ones I think you
    also have to put your left leg in and do
    the Hokey Pokey before the thing will
    operate. ;-)

    --
    Rick Swanson

    Morristown, Tennessee
    CARGPB6
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Ken Layton wrote:

    > Have you actually telephoned the tech support department at Tommy Gate?

    I had hoped to make this my Labor Day
    Weekend project and their tech support
    folks aren't available until Tuesday.
    >


    --
    Rick Swanson

    Morristown, Tennessee
    CARGPB6
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    For your application, you do not need a dedicated
    ground cable. I would suggest you add a 4 guage
    cable from the battery down to the frame just to be
    sure you have a good ground. Near the battery and
    straight down would be fine.

    --
    Fred
    TX
    CARGPB#8
    ******************


    "Rick Swanson" <rns510@charter.net> wrote

    > What I'm really trying to determine is
    > if my lift is supposed to have a
    > dedicated grounding cable that would run
    > from the pump motor to the negative side
    > of the truck battery. The lift came
    > with the cable that runs from the
    > positive side of the battery to the pump
    > motor but no other cable. The wiring
    > diagram for the newer TommyGate shows
    > the dedicated grounding cable.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Rick I never installed one of these. But I really dont see it being
    very hard. I was a car audio installer for about 13 years. Did it
    professionally and I know a shitload about 12v dc type of wiring.

    You wanted to know about the ground. What size wire is it using? I
    would just ground the electric motor to the frame. Using a good ring
    terminal and a star washer. I would then in turn re ground the exisitng
    battery to the frame in the front. I dont care how thick of a wire you
    run to the battery it isnt gonna be more conductive than the vehicle
    frame. Also I strongly suggest using a circuit breaker within 6 to 18
    inches of the battery. If that thick positive wire you run ever touches
    the frame, its gonna be smokey time. It will burn that wire and
    anything next to it. Also run the wire you run through some sort of
    electrical conduit. Look at see what the maxium amperage the electric
    motor uses and then use a circuit breaker under the hood. These are
    available from car audio store all over the place. My cost on them were
    about 18 bucks, and they are available from 20a-300a. Good luck
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Fred Kemper wrote:

    > For your application, you do not need a dedicated
    > ground cable. I would suggest you add a 4 guage
    > cable from the battery down to the frame just to be
    > sure you have a good ground. Near the battery and
    > straight down would be fine.
    >


    Thanks Fred. Will do. The battery in
    my truck is one of those that has two
    lugs for each pole so I'll use the
    second negative lug to ground it to the
    frame.


    --
    Rick Swanson

    Morristown, Tennessee
    CARGPB6
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    On Sun, 04 Sep, Rick Swanson wrote:
    > Mine looks like this:
    > http://webpages.charter.net/rswanson3354/TommyGate.jpg

    Damn, that's one I never used. I got to skip that generation somehow.

    > I believe that the newer models have
    > their safety features integrated into
    > the external switch box. I think the
    > only safety mechanism on my older model
    > is a remote "in cab" switch that
    > provides/cuts the power to the external
    > switch box.

    I'd be surprised if that was the only safety feature. Reason I say that is
    that the generation before what you have pictured had a big knob that came
    up from the lower part of the gate that you pulled up to make the gate go
    down, and pushed down to make the gate go up (go figure). While you could
    always pull it up to get the gate to go down, before you could make it go
    up you had to flip a small lever around at the bottom that "engaged" the up
    direction. Once you released making it go up it fell out of the way again
    so you couldn't "accidentally" hit the knob to make it go up.

    Now, there's the chance that since they moved the switches to the side like
    this that for a while they didn't think they needed a safety mechanism. I
    doubt it, though.

    > What I'm really trying to determine is
    > if my lift is supposed to have a
    > dedicated grounding cable that would run
    > from the pump motor to the negative side
    > of the truck battery. The lift came
    > with the cable that runs from the
    > positive side of the battery to the pump
    > motor but no other cable. The wiring
    > diagram for the newer TommyGate shows
    > the dedicated grounding cable.

    Don't know why you'd need a grounding cable. The thing is a big steel
    object that's bolted directly to the best ground you have on a truck, the
    frame. Your pump probably derives its ground from the mounts, just like
    lights and other automotive accessories do.

    > Also, I don't know if I have to do
    > anything other than push "up" or "down"
    > to get this thing to operate. The newer
    > ones you have to press the "TommyGate"
    > logo on the switch box face in order to
    > activate the "up" and "down" buttons.
    > Actually, on the newer ones I think you
    > also have to put your left leg in and do
    > the Hokey Pokey before the thing will
    > operate. ;-)

    Yeah, that's the generation I've dealt with with external controls. But
    that generation has a little LED and must have some sort of internal PCB
    with circuitry on it. Looks like you can remove your control panel and
    look and see if there's anything complex in there, or if you just have
    momentary switches that are wired to relays somewhere in the gate (the
    relays are probably near the pump). If there's no advanced looking
    circuitry then you probably don't have additional safety measures. If
    there is, well, you'll need someone with one of these gates to tell you
    what the hell to do. But you knew that. ;-)

    This thing doesn't need to be very complex...the "up" switch should just go
    to a "solenoid" (automotive term for "heavy duty power relay") that runs
    the pump. The "down" switch should just connect to a small pressure
    release solenoid that lets fluid out of the system and back into the
    reservoir. When my Dad's fancy safety control circuitry gave up on one of
    his he just replaced the whole mess with one switch (two direction, center
    off). You run power to the middle of the switch. On one side run to the
    "up" solenoid. On the other run to the "release" solenoid. Use a
    momentary switch for safety and mount somewhere you can't easily bump it.
    End of overly-aggressive safety mechanism, and probably far cheaper than
    fixing it anyway.


    --Donnie

    --
    Donnie Barnes http://www.donniebarnes.com 879. V.
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Donnie Barnes wrote:
    The "down" switch should just connect
    to a small pressure
    > release solenoid that lets fluid out of the system and back into the
    > reservoir.

    I took my handy DMM to the thing and
    discovered that the previous owner (or
    his "repairman") had wired the release
    solenoid to ground and the switch
    control ground wire to the motor
    solenoid. Bottom line, nothing was
    wired where it was supposed to be. I
    got all the wires where they need to be
    and everything works great now.

    If I hadn't discovered this newsgroup
    and learned of Clay's manuals I would
    never have developed the ability to
    "logic out" simple wiring systems. I
    feel so empowered. :-)

    --
    Rick Swanson

    Morristown, Tennessee
    CARGPB6
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    mikep28@omuonline.net wrote:
    ....
    Look at see what the maxium amperage
    the electric
    > motor uses and then use a circuit breaker under the hood. These are
    > available from car audio store all over the place. My cost on them were
    > about 18 bucks, and they are available from 20a-300a. Good luck
    >

    Thanks for the suggestion. I want to
    put a breaker in but wasn't sure where
    to get one (tried the local autoparts
    stores). I'll check with our local
    audiophile store.
    --
    Rick Swanson

    Morristown, Tennessee
    CARGPB6
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