BSD Coma

Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

I only removed and replaced the sound board. All connectors are connected
properly.

When I changed the board, I left the batteries in, and the machine was
unplugged. Should I remove the batteries for a few minutes, put them back
in and try the machine again?
5 answers Last reply
More about coma
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    "billc479" <billc479@aol.com> wrote in
    news:11i4nkliu7gf848@corp.supernews.com:

    > I only removed and replaced the sound board. All connectors are
    > connected properly.
    >
    > When I changed the board, I left the batteries in, and the machine was
    > unplugged. Should I remove the batteries for a few minutes, put them
    > back in and try the machine again?

    Hard to say. Are you hoping that removing the batteries will put the
    original sound board back in? :)
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    "TheKorn" <TheKorn@TheKorn.Net> wrote in message
    news:Xns96CD414ED55B1qqwwaass@207.115.63.158...
    > "billc479" <billc479@aol.com> wrote in
    > news:11i4nkliu7gf848@corp.supernews.com:
    >
    > > I only removed and replaced the sound board. All connectors are
    > > connected properly.
    > >
    > > When I changed the board, I left the batteries in, and the machine was
    > > unplugged. Should I remove the batteries for a few minutes, put them
    > > back in and try the machine again?
    >
    > Hard to say. Are you hoping that removing the batteries will put the
    > original sound board back in? :)
    OK Korn, I guess w/o the complete thread that sounded stupid. I only
    swapped sound boards, the "new" one didn't work, so I put the working one
    back in. (The machine was working great before I swapped the sound board).
    Ever since, I don't get a display that means anything, and a high frequency
    sound. Trying to go to test doesn't do anything, and the CPU LEDs indicate
    that the CPU is normal. Aside from comedy, any real ideas?

    On another point, is there some way to test a board w/o putting it in a
    working game? TIA
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    "billc479" <billc479@aol.com> wrote in
    news:11i6l1icrt6d3b8@corp.supernews.com:

    > "TheKorn" <TheKorn@TheKorn.Net> wrote in message
    > news:Xns96CD414ED55B1qqwwaass@207.115.63.158...
    >> "billc479" <billc479@aol.com> wrote in
    >> news:11i4nkliu7gf848@corp.supernews.com:
    >>
    >> > I only removed and replaced the sound board. All connectors are
    >> > connected properly.
    >> >
    >> > When I changed the board, I left the batteries in, and the machine
    >> > was unplugged. Should I remove the batteries for a few minutes,
    >> > put them back in and try the machine again?
    >>
    >> Hard to say. Are you hoping that removing the batteries will put the
    >> original sound board back in? :)
    >
    > OK Korn, I guess w/o the complete thread that sounded stupid.

    Well not _stupid_ per se. It was just one of those, "you have to know
    what I'm talking about to know what I'm talking about" kind of
    conversations.

    > I only
    > swapped sound boards, the "new" one didn't work, so I put the working
    > one back in. (The machine was working great before I swapped the
    > sound board). Ever since, I don't get a display that means anything,
    > and a high frequency sound. Trying to go to test doesn't do anything,
    > and the CPU LEDs indicate that the CPU is normal. Aside from comedy,
    > any real ideas?
    >
    > On another point, is there some way to test a board w/o putting it in
    > a working game? TIA

    AH! Yes, now that makes a lot more sense! :)

    Most _likely_ cause is the ribbon cable being off by one on the sound
    board. Take your digital inspectors (hint: you were born with ten of
    them) and feel around all FOUR SIDES of the ribbon cable. Chances are,
    you're off by one, and on one side you'll feel pins.

    If that doesn't fix you up, I would disconnect the sound board entirely
    and then fire up the game. If your display comes up, then we know that
    everything is still _good_, just something wonky going on with the sound
    board.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Korn - I did check the connector, and it was on properly. I tried to put
    it on wrong just to see if I could get it to go on wrong, but hte only way
    would be to bend the pins. Howver, HAPPY NEWS! BSD is alive again - I
    pulled the entire ribbon cable out of the machine, and found that one of the
    pins is intermittently making contact in the cable assembly. I've got it
    going for now, I think I'll try to get a new ribbon cable. Isn't this the
    same cable that computers have inside of them for the hard drives, etc?

    Now then, back to my original mission: Testing the spare sound board. How
    is the best way to check the spare board?

    "TheKorn" <TheKorn@TheKorn.Net> wrote in message
    news:Xns96CDB5F7AF2CAqqwwaass@207.115.63.158...
    > "billc479" <billc479@aol.com> wrote in
    > news:11i6l1icrt6d3b8@corp.supernews.com:
    >
    > > "TheKorn" <TheKorn@TheKorn.Net> wrote in message
    > > news:Xns96CD414ED55B1qqwwaass@207.115.63.158...
    > >> "billc479" <billc479@aol.com> wrote in
    > >> news:11i4nkliu7gf848@corp.supernews.com:
    > >>
    > >> > I only removed and replaced the sound board. All connectors are
    > >> > connected properly.
    > >> >
    > >> > When I changed the board, I left the batteries in, and the machine
    > >> > was unplugged. Should I remove the batteries for a few minutes,
    > >> > put them back in and try the machine again?
    > >>
    > >> Hard to say. Are you hoping that removing the batteries will put the
    > >> original sound board back in? :)
    > >
    > > OK Korn, I guess w/o the complete thread that sounded stupid.
    >
    > Well not _stupid_ per se. It was just one of those, "you have to know
    > what I'm talking about to know what I'm talking about" kind of
    > conversations.
    >
    > > I only
    > > swapped sound boards, the "new" one didn't work, so I put the working
    > > one back in. (The machine was working great before I swapped the
    > > sound board). Ever since, I don't get a display that means anything,
    > > and a high frequency sound. Trying to go to test doesn't do anything,
    > > and the CPU LEDs indicate that the CPU is normal. Aside from comedy,
    > > any real ideas?
    > >
    > > On another point, is there some way to test a board w/o putting it in
    > > a working game? TIA
    >
    > AH! Yes, now that makes a lot more sense! :)
    >
    > Most _likely_ cause is the ribbon cable being off by one on the sound
    > board. Take your digital inspectors (hint: you were born with ten of
    > them) and feel around all FOUR SIDES of the ribbon cable. Chances are,
    > you're off by one, and on one side you'll feel pins.
    >
    > If that doesn't fix you up, I would disconnect the sound board entirely
    > and then fire up the game. If your display comes up, then we know that
    > everything is still _good_, just something wonky going on with the sound
    > board.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    "billc479" <billc479@aol.com> wrote in
    news:11i71l8buj123f8@corp.supernews.com:

    > Korn - I did check the connector, and it was on properly. I tried to
    > put it on wrong just to see if I could get it to go on wrong, but hte
    > only way would be to bend the pins. Howver, HAPPY NEWS! BSD is
    > alive again - I pulled the entire ribbon cable out of the machine, and
    > found that one of the pins is intermittently making contact in the
    > cable assembly. I've got it going for now, I think I'll try to get a
    > new ribbon cable. Isn't this the same cable that computers have
    > inside of them for the hard drives, etc?

    It's the same type of cable and same connectors. If you get one of those
    "u crimp 'em" cables, you should be able to fashion up a replacement.

    > Now then, back to my original mission: Testing the spare sound board.
    > How is the best way to check the spare board?

    That's kind of a toughie without some sort of variac, since different
    generations need different voltage levels. The easiest way is inside a
    known working game, provided the sound board in question isn't too nutso.
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