Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Limiting CPU usage of a process?

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
December 16, 2012 5:38:26 PM

Hello, I want to run Folding at Home (FAH), but I don't want the FAH process to take up 100% of my CPU (6 core, 3.7Ghz) because it runs really loud and I don't want it to burn out the CPU and fan. Is there any programs I can schedule to run at login and silently limit it in the background? I found the program BES, but you have to re-configure which process to target every time you log in. I know I can change the Affinity of the process, but running BES at 50% runs a LOT quieter than running half the cores. Any ideas?
a b $ Windows 7
December 16, 2012 7:12:03 PM

Why not use Task Scheduler and set it as as a background service or when on idle?
m
0
l
December 16, 2012 7:23:45 PM

jinksy said:
Why not use Task Scheduler and set it as as a background service or when on idle?

Each time the computer is logged off, you have to open BES, click "Target this process", select the process you want, then click start, so it's not as simple as just using task scheduler to start the process =/ (basically BES doesn't save what settings you had running last time)

Also, I appreciate the reply greatly!
m
0
l
Related resources
December 20, 2012 2:11:56 AM

Anyone have an idea?
m
0
l
December 20, 2012 3:54:31 AM

Wish I knew - Google Chrome (when using more than one tab or in regular operation with no apps) wastes soooo much memory. I don't even understand why - why 4 or 5 instances in the task manager/processes window?
m
0
l
a c 232 $ Windows 7
December 20, 2012 12:16:26 PM

Tom's hardware put out a utility a few years back that would remember your programs and CPU affinity. I don't know if they ever kept it up to date. You may also be able to use the startup menu to run a batch file containing commands for Runfirst.

http://www.activeplus.com/us/freeware/runfirst/
m
0
l
December 21, 2012 10:55:58 PM

AMKR said:
I don't even understand why - why 4 or 5 instances in the task manager/processes window?

I think Chrome does this so it spreads it's service out among the cores of your processor as to not put the whole browser into one core (thus slowing how fast it can be processed). It's smart but useless if you have a computer with less or just one core

Hawkeye22 said:
Tom's hardware put out a utility a few years back that would remember your programs and CPU affinity. I don't know if they ever kept it up to date. You may also be able to use the startup menu to
run a batch file containing commands for Runfirst.

This changes the affinity though, which seems to act differently (a lot hotter and noisier) than what BES does. BES changes how often that process gets used rather than how many cores it uses. Good suggestion though! Any other ideas? =/
m
0
l
!