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Nedd help P2

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  • CPUs
  • Heatsinks
  • Processors
  • Product
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January 27, 2005 9:44:26 PM

Hi I'm new to this, I've been to sites and can't really find actual instructions.

Heres what I have:
450Mhz P2 Processor
heres the number on the processor:
80523PY450512PE SL207

98290923-0674 MALAY
Its an Old Pentium II Processor, its black, big (it plugs into the motherboard like an SNES cartridge) it has dual fans on the gold heatsink, the heatsink is about a half an inch long. Thats all I know about it. I'm getting a new PC next week and I want to see how far I can overclock this and how better it will run (not much i know)

Any information you can give me or I can give you to help me with this please ask.

Thanks a bunch

More about : nedd

January 27, 2005 10:40:59 PM

Mobo and revision might help.
I'll leave your question to Crashman. No-one here can answer you as well as he can.
January 28, 2005 3:29:42 AM

Okay, thanks I have found some more information, and tweaked my system (found the overdrive thing on my mobo) with no luck. my mobo is a Gigabyte GA-BX2000+

Just really need to know now what kind of overclocking I should expect or try, I've read that no two overclockings, even for the same kind of machine are exactly the same.

heres the options I have
3x
3.5x
4x
4.5x
5x
5.5x
6x
6.5x
7x
7.5x
8x
8.5x

and :
152
142
133
124
112
100
66

Anyway thanks :) 
January 28, 2005 11:39:08 AM

A processor's final speed is given by [Multiplier] X [<b>F</b>ront <b>S</b>ide <b>B</b>us Speed]. Normally (especially in systems of that age) the memory runs at the same speed as the FSB. Pretty sure your Bus speed is 100Mhz, and your multiplier is 4.5x, giving 4.5x100 = 450Mhz.

Quote:
heres the options I have
3x
3.5x
4x
4.5x
5x
5.5x
6x
6.5x
7x
7.5x
8x
8.5x

Those are multipliers. The bad news for you here is that Intel have always locked the multipliers on their chips, so whatever you set will have no effect :frown: .

Quote:
and :
152
142
133
124
112
100
66

<i>These</i>, however, are the FSB speeds you can select. Because your multipliers are locked, adjusting this is the only way you have to increase the speed of your CPU.
e.g. at 112 your CPU would run at 4.5x112 = 504Mhz.

There are a couple of problems with increasing this value though:
A) increasing it will increase the speed of your RAM. If you have only PC100 RAM, and try to run at 112 then it may not work. The easy solution to this is to have some good PC133 stuff instead :smile: .
B) The PCI/AGP buses in your system are supposed to run at 33/66Mhz. These speeds are derived directly from the FSB on older systems using a divider (1/3 in your case - 1/3 x 100 = 33Mhz). So if you increase the FSB, you also increase the speed of your PCI/AGP buses. So if you increase the FSB to 112, you'll get 37/74 instead of 33/66. Some cards (network cards, video cards...) won't like the increase and will stop working. you may have an option to change the divider to 1/4 - as that would be necessary to support a bus of 133.

You may need to increase the voltage your processor is using to get it stable at higher speeds, or (if the board supports it) you may need to do the same with the RAM... There's also the possibility of adjusting the RAM timings if your memory is holding you back...

By no means a comprehensive guide, but covers a few important things. If you already know all this then I apologise....

As mentioned above though, Crashman is going to be the #1 expert on this stuff. He'll probably notice and pitch in if the thread stays visible.

---
"Sex without love is an empty experience...
But as empty experiences go, it's one of the best" - Woody Allen<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by ChipDeath on 01/28/05 01:41 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
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January 29, 2005 1:17:34 AM

Your CPU will go 500-600MHz. You may be limitted by your RAM or your inability to adjust the CPU core voltage. Your board would support the PIII-S (Tualatin) 1.4GHz processor using PC133 SDRAM and the Upgradeware Slot-T adapter, if you were interested in getting truely great performance from it.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 29, 2005 1:25:41 AM

How much do those adapters cost? I have 3 or 4 of those P2's lying around.

To save us both time, assume I know EVERYTHING :tongue:
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January 29, 2005 1:56:14 AM

The Upgradeware Slot-T cost $20 and adapts the Tualatin to most VRM 8.4 Slot-1 motherboards. VRM 8.4 is the spec used for Coppermine cores. The Slot-T also has voltage and bus speed detection (VID and BSEL pin) jumpers that allow you to override the factory settings for any board (so you could set a Tualatin Celleron to be detected at 1.65v core and 133MHz bus if you wanted).

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 29, 2005 3:08:10 AM

Thanks everyone for your help :)  so far I have OC'ed it to 504Mhz, I get acouple of hiccups every now and then though. Mostly when I try to play Wolfenstein - Enemy Territory, it sometimes resets my pc. I don't have the option to increase voltage and my memory is pc100. Anything over 504mhz my pc won't even boot up


Edited: Theres no need to hurry for responses here, I'm getting myself a brand new PC next week. I just wanted to give my sister something a little faster than this.
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by akari87 on 01/29/05 00:10 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
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January 29, 2005 3:12:11 AM

And finding low density PC133 for the last 2 years has been hell, so upgrading isn't an economically viable solution.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 29, 2005 3:23:08 AM

so basically this pc is becomming an antique?
January 29, 2005 10:51:49 AM

They were built for the long haul. Up until a few months ago, I had been using 1998 models. Very few repairs on those old systems. They can still be used for quite a few projects. Having one as a backup isnt a bad idea either.

To save us both time, assume I know EVERYTHING :tongue:
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January 29, 2005 3:23:46 PM

Compgeeks carries 16-chip 256MB DIMMs (the largest size supported at the maximum density supported of 16MB/chip) for $41. That's PC133, used, around 1/2 the price of what these now-rare chips cost new.

A Celeron 1400 on a Slot-T adapter would come out to around $70 ($50+$20), if you can find the Celeron 1400. These are Tualatins so they give good performance compared to any other Celeron produced. Because they use a 100MHz bus, you could use your old RAM.

A Celeron 1100@1466MHz is around 30% faster than a Celeron 1400 because of the higher memory throughput caused by overclocking the bus to 133MHz, but that requires PC133!

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
a b à CPUs
January 29, 2005 3:25:32 PM

I sell lots of 1998 computers, they work fine as a word processor and internet terminal, which is what 90% of people use a PC for anyway.

And many of them offer SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE compared to a brand-new VIA Eden platform!

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
!