Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

The power consumption of an OC computer

Last response: in CPUs
Share
June 23, 2005 2:43:42 PM

Will it increase once i OC my comp??

Any advice about OC my Gigabyte K8NF-9 mobo, with duel Giel 265 3200 ram, Venice 3000+, GIgabyte XFX 6600GT, HEC Compucase 6A19 with 400W ATX 2 power and Akasa EVO33 cpu cooling.
Where do i begin, is OC mobo specific? or CPU?
June 23, 2005 3:42:00 PM

yes. Linearly to the increase in clock rate and vCore I believe.

Mike.
June 23, 2005 3:44:34 PM

The mobo should have OCing features.
Because you could have the same CPU as other person, but if you don't have the capability to modify the FSB, the voltage,and the multiplier you're not going to be able to OC.



<font color=red>Left to themselves, all things go from bad to worse</font color=red>
Related resources
June 23, 2005 3:45:40 PM

Read a little in the forums in the overclocking section



<font color=red>Left to themselves, all things go from bad to worse</font color=red>
June 23, 2005 4:15:54 PM

Power will increase lineary with clockspeed, and to the power of two wih vcore. so yes, power consumption will increase significantly (depending how far you push it).

= The views stated herein are my personal views, and not necessarily the views of my wife. =
June 23, 2005 4:24:12 PM

Quote:
power of two wih vcore

So, does that mean a 10% clock increase (vcore same) is 10% more power (say 88 instead of 80w), but a 10% vcore increase with no clock change is more than that? How does that work? I would have thought that going from 1.5 to 1.65vcore @ 2.0ghz would have just been 10% more power.

Mike.
June 23, 2005 4:31:41 PM

>So, does that mean a 10% clock increase (vcore same) is 10%
>more power (say 88 instead of 80w)

Yes.

>but a 10% vcore increase with no clock change is more than
>that?

Yep.

Overclocked Watt = Default Watt * (Overclocked Mhz / Default Mhz) * (Overclocked Vcore / Default Vcore)²

Please note the "²" (squared) at the end.

= The views stated herein are my personal views, and not necessarily the views of my wife. =
June 23, 2005 4:35:50 PM

power P = (V)^2 / R

V=voltage
R=resistance

<font color=red>Left to themselves, all things go from bad to worse</font color=red>
June 23, 2005 7:34:23 PM

There is one factor that can alter this. Your right on the money, and im not arguing about the power consumption. There are places everywhere that have what many refer to as dirty power. As dirty power increases all sorts of bad thingys also increase but at a faster rate than the power does. The other thing that is common with dirty power is that as more of it is consumed, the bad aspects that increase sometimes have a negative impact on the actual usable or clean power that makes it to the unit. What does this have to do with the discussion? Probably not a damn thing :tongue: but I thought it was a good place to mention it. I think that many people have this issue and are not aware of it. Its so bad in my neighborhood that I run three UPS units that are rated from 550W up to 850W. If I didnt, I would lose a tv and computer at least once a week.

<font color=green>NED FLANDERS FOR PRESIDENT</font color=green> Its justa nother gansta PARTY!
Intel P4 Extreme(3.73)@<font color=green>5.6Ghz</font color=green>
Asus P5AD2-E-Premium
Crucial Ballistix DDR2 667@DDR2 855
June 23, 2005 10:04:59 PM

True, but how does resistance scale with clockspeed ?
Apparently, lineary :) 

= The views stated herein are my personal views, and not necessarily the views of my wife. =
!