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Playstation 3DTV vs. Traditional PC monitors?

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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February 7, 2012 12:47:27 AM

Is it worth the extra $100 or should I just get a traditional PC monitor which is what I am leaning towards right now. I want to use the TV or Monitor for gaming on PS3, 360, and PC. The only reason why I considered buying the TV is because when I bought a monitor last time it displayed both my PS3 and 360 blurry/fuzzy and not as detailed. Here are the Specs for the 3DTV:

Specifications:
Display type: Stereoscopic 3D HDTV
Screen size: 24"
Resolution: 1080p (1920 x 1080)
Colors: 16.7 million
Contrast ratio: 5000:1
Backlight type: Edge LED, white LED
Digital inputs (side): 2 HDMI, 1 component
Refresh rate: 240 Hz
Sound output: speakers (3W x 2), subwoofer (1 x 5w), 3.5 mm headphone jack (1)
Remote support: IR remote control with BD remote control (sold separately)
Dimensions: 29.75"(w) x 17.06"(h) x 4.50"(d)
3D glasses
Type: Active Shutter 3D
Rechargeable battery life: 30 hr.
Dimensions: 3" (w) x 7-1/8" (h) x 2" (d)
Additional items included: micro-USB cable, 3D glasses pouch and instruction manual

While it does seem like a good deal since it's 3D, I think a PC monitor will output HD better. Am I right here?

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a b î Playstation
a c 105 C Monitor
February 7, 2012 10:39:19 AM

currently there are people who experience what you would call a delay or lag when using a pc output to a 120 or 240 hertz television. it seems to vary by model as not all "60hz or PC mode" options appear to work to fix this. normally i suggest a 60hz tv if you want to connect it to games and pcs. this takes out the option of 3d though. it will however pretty much guarantee zero issues.

a computer monitor should display your consoles fine provided it is hdcp capable. having hdmi input on the monitor should help as well. you are probably stuck with 60hz here as well since your consoles output 60hz i believe. a 120hz pc monitor takes dualdvi instead of a single cable...so not sure how it would work if you tried to put other sources in.
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a b C Monitor
February 7, 2012 11:35:47 AM

uploadcomplete said:
Is it worth the extra $100 or should I just get a traditional PC monitor which is what I am leaning towards right now. I want to use the TV or Monitor for gaming on PS3, 360, and PC. The only reason why I considered buying the TV is because when I bought a monitor last time it displayed both my PS3 and 360 blurry/fuzzy and not as detailed. Here are the Specs for the 3DTV:

Specifications:
Display type: Stereoscopic 3D HDTV
Screen size: 24"
Resolution: 1080p (1920 x 1080)
Colors: 16.7 million
Contrast ratio: 5000:1
Backlight type: Edge LED, white LED
Digital inputs (side): 2 HDMI, 1 component
Refresh rate: 240 Hz
Sound output: speakers (3W x 2), subwoofer (1 x 5w), 3.5 mm headphone jack (1)
Remote support: IR remote control with BD remote control (sold separately)
Dimensions: 29.75"(w) x 17.06"(h) x 4.50"(d)
3D glasses
Type: Active Shutter 3D
Rechargeable battery life: 30 hr.
Dimensions: 3" (w) x 7-1/8" (h) x 2" (d)
Additional items included: micro-USB cable, 3D glasses pouch and instruction manual

While it does seem like a good deal since it's 3D, I think a PC monitor will output HD better. Am I right here?


what do you mean by outputting hd better? the television looks great if you got the money you can go for it.

The monitors have advantage of lower response times but for a console using wifi this will not happen much;

nothing to worry about the 240hertz since this is not a real output, it is a interpolation the television does with the image.

you will be able to play your games at 1080p same way;
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a b î Playstation
a c 105 C Monitor
February 7, 2012 2:38:04 PM

umm what?

since we are talking about 1920x1080 screens the term HD is irrelevant. what is important is screen size which controls how sharp an image will look at a set resolution and panel type which controls such things as brightness, color accuracy and viewing angles. i've seen the television... nothing special really and for the price you have other options.

response time =/= network lag! any delay you get in a multiplayer game because of bad network traffic is a completely seperate case. what we are concerned about is how fast the monitor can respond to the input signals from the source.

which is exactly why 120/240hz causes the delay and lag on some models in the first place. i think we all know by now that most content is output at 60hz with dualdvi being two 60hz dvi cables. the problem is the post processing done which can cause a slight delay. you do not notice this on movies as there are no control inputs (ie, turning your characters head in a game) to relate to so the video looks smoother. i'm not saying that some televisions might have a working 60hz or game mode, i'm just saying that buyer beware.

if you believe otherwise.... look at all the people posting about severe input lag caused by using such televisions.
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a b C Monitor
February 7, 2012 3:05:32 PM

Here is a difference if you want 120hz monitor.

Are you saying 120hz monitor have less response time than normal monitors?

Look at this...

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/benq_xl2410t.htm

120 hertz and response time = 2ms the response time, but this happens because this is REAL 120hz, with dual link cable;

The problem of television is because they don't use real 120hz (no dual link cable), they do a polarization post process that is what may increase response time, but you can TURN OFF this resource on 3d tvs anyways.

the wifi i mean was not the INTERNET, it was controller, just by using a controller not wired you will experience some delay... so i mean, if you can live with controller lag, image drawn slower will not be so noticable;
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a b î Playstation
a c 105 C Monitor
February 7, 2012 7:01:24 PM

i will repeat.... what? perhaps you should read what i wrote before commenting.

i never stated that a 120hz monitor had less more/less response time then a normal monitor. quite a few tn panels have 2ms response times in fact. what i said was that the post processing done on 120/240hz "televisions" can create a form of visual lag. television =/= monitor.

i've seen several reports that even in the so called "off mode" some people still experience issues. this is why i brought it up. on some models things appear to be fine, on others the lag persists.

one would think that the tv is somewhat optimized for the ps3. however assuming it acts like a normal tv: total lag would equal controller lag plus monitor response plus post processing delay. so if anything the lag would appear more pronounced. at least on the ps3 side... the bluetooth controllers if they lag at all its not enough to be noticible. if you read my post though you will realize that i was talking about how such lag would affect pc gaming not console gaming. i have no basis for opinion on consoles as i havent heard anything about any issues yet but i have for pc gaming.
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February 7, 2012 9:36:04 PM

ssddx said:
currently there are people who experience what you would call a delay or lag when using a pc output to a 120 or 240 hertz television. it seems to vary by model as not all "60hz or PC mode" options appear to work to fix this. normally i suggest a 60hz tv if you want to connect it to games and pcs. this takes out the option of 3d though. it will however pretty much guarantee zero issues.

a computer monitor should display your consoles fine provided it is hdcp capable. having hdmi input on the monitor should help as well. you are probably stuck with 60hz here as well since your consoles output 60hz i believe. a 120hz pc monitor takes dualdvi instead of a single cable...so not sure how it would work if you tried to put other sources in.


I bought an HP, and Acer to display my PC and consoles and it was HDCP capable but it was still being displayed with some blur. I wish I still had the monitors so I can show you what I mean. (Example: If a solider in battlefield 3 ran past me I would see a blur trailing him, even selecting an app on the 360 would show a slight blur.) With the 3DTV I have now, this does not happen anymore. Games look smoother and better, but there are some issues. Blacks come out looking grey at times and the sides of the TV look like lights beeming out at me(only when the room is dark, or maybe its just the viewing angle) I'll try it on a desktop in abit and tell you the results. I do believe that people have had issues, my friend had issues displaying his pc on his HDTV. His TV was 60hz though. I got the 3DTV for $300. What monitors do you suggest in the same price range?
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February 7, 2012 9:44:06 PM

ricardois said:
what do you mean by outputting hd better? the television looks great if you got the money you can go for it.

The monitors have advantage of lower response times but for a console using wifi this will not happen much;

nothing to worry about the 240hertz since this is not a real output, it is a interpolation the television does with the image.

you will be able to play your games at 1080p same way;


I don't have much issues with the the HDTV ATM but I just wanted to get the most for my money. The TV was just $300 which is why I bought it. I saw some decent monitors for $200 over at newegg and bestbuy. Since I don't know much about response times..etc I don't know which one would be better.
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a c 195 C Monitor
February 7, 2012 10:41:51 PM

Generally speaking, response time is the amount of time it takes the pixels to changes colors; from one shade of grey to another. The faster the response time (i.e. the lower it is) the less likely you are going to ghosting or image after effects. But, response time is not an exact science. Manufacturers simply measures the fastest time and discards the slowest times. If monitor A's fastest response time is 2ms, but it's slowest response time is 300ms, then it is simply rated at 2ms. If monitor B's fastest response time is 5ms (worse than monitor A), but it's slowest is just 250ms (better than monitor A), then it is simply rated at 5ms.

Arguably, there is not much difference between 2ms and 5ms. Some will even say that the monitor's response time can be as slow as 12ms and you still will not detect ghosting. I would say you should not buy anything that is worse than 6ms; good thing a lot of monitors have 6ms or less response times.


ssddx brought up input lag. Input lag is basically the amount of time it takes for your actions to be displayed on the screen. If you are playing a game like Crysis and you press the mouse button to fire you gun, but you have to wait one second for it to actually happen in the game, then the input lag is one second (it's actually never that high). Input lag is basically the time it takes for the electronic signal to travel from the mouse and keyboard to CPU to process that instruction, then for the video card to send that signal to the monitor's (or HDTV's) input port and then travel through the various electronics within the monitor and finally displayed on the screen. I skipped a lot of steps, but you get the idea. There will always be some input lag, it cannot be avoided. However, it can be minimized by choosing the correct HDTV or monitor. How do you know which HDTV or monitor has the lowest input lag? Someone must test it.

The reason why you want to set a 120Hz or 240Hz HDTV to 60Hz or "Game Mode" is to reduce artificial input lag. All HDTVs only accepts 60Hz (or 60 frames per second), however they can output 60 frames, 120 frames (120Hz) or up to a "simulated 240 frames" (240Hz). How is this done; taking in only 60 frames per second, but outputting 120 frames per second? It's done through video interpolation. In between every two actual frame, the HDTV's electronics creates an interpolated image. This helps smooth out video playback and can also draw out details. Great, but it takes time to do it, thus you get input lag.

The same thing with 240Hz mode, but there are two different 240Hz modes; "real" and "fake". "Real" 240Hz mode does even more processing so that the input lag is even greater. According to a friend of mine who as a Sony 240Hz HDTV (I don't know which model) the 240Hz gives a little bit of depth to the picture. It's kinda like you have a picture of kids playing in a playground that's made up of layers of paper on top of each other. The background of the park is a sheet of paper, the kids playing in the background is a cut out that is placed on top of the background, and finally there is a paper cutout of you in the foreground and that is placed over the other kids. "Fake" 240Hz is simply 120Hz with the HDTV's backlight strobing on and of very quickly, so fast you don't even know it. What the hell does strobing has to do with anything? I'm sure you've been to a dance club. Sometimes they turn off most of the light and then they have strobe lights flashing on and off. What do you see? You see other people around you for a fraction of a second that seems to be have been captured like in a picture very sharply. That's "fake" 240Hz mode. The strobing effect is supposed help sharpen video on the HDTV does? As an owner of a "fake" 240Hz HDTV... I don't think so.

Regarding multi-player online games... A lot of the lag is due to "ping" which is the amount of time it takes for data from your PC to travel thru the internet to reach the server that is hosting your game. Most of this type of lag is out of your control and sometimes it can be very little lag, other times there could be a lot of lag. Some internet service providers have more ping than others. Solution? Switch to an ISP with less ping. If there isn't a better one, then... too bad. The distance between you and the server that's host the game also plays a role. You want to choose the closest server. Then there's internet traffic... sorry but there's no way for to force other people off the internet... unless they are on the same home network you are and you control the router. Back to the game hosting server... if it is being overwhelmed by the number of people connected to then you have a problem. I'm sure there are other issues related to network lag, but I don't play online games so I never researched it.
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a b î Playstation
a c 105 C Monitor
February 8, 2012 11:49:34 AM

@jaguarskx

pretty much what i already said, posted in greater detail. also for reference i can attest to my 16ms r/t monitor not ghosting. though i do believe 16ms is the cutoff for 60hz.

@op

if the television works fine with no noticible input lag then keep it. are there other options out there? yes. are some of them better? some may be. is it worth discarding what you have now? not unless you want to go to a bigger screen or if you have problems when you hook it up to your pc.
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October 25, 2012 11:08:29 AM

Best answer selected by uploadcomplete.
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a c 128 C Monitor
October 26, 2012 1:20:08 AM

In case you have not chosen your monitor yet, there are monitors that support both 120hz gaming and 3D Vision on dual link DVI for PC's and supports HDMI 3D as well, for movies, PS3's and even HD3D. The one in my signature is one such monitor.
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February 13, 2014 10:58:16 PM

The moniter ok. I actually have it,but if you do get it remember that there are better desktop moniters for lower prices. The tv looks amazing on any gaming device ,but it is known to break after 6 months in and it probably going to have more input lag than your common pc moniter. I would give the tv a 7/10 ;) 
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