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DNS Problem

Last response: in Windows 7
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December 28, 2012 12:23:48 AM

Earlier today I tried to give my pc a static ip which i used to do all the time on windows xp without a problem. I went to ipconfig /all and basically just copied what was already there for ip and dns settings just so it wouldn't change on it's own.

Well once I hit enter on that I haven't been able to get on the internet since. I restarted the pc and went back into those settings and it had the automatic setting checked off like i didn't do anything but the internet still wouldn't work. I tried putting in some different numbers and setting it back to automatic a few times but still nothing. It says it's connected to the internet and it's uploading and downloading but I can't actually browse the internet. I looked in ipconfig and the ip is the same but the dns says: fec0:0:0:fff::1%1

I haven't really played around with computer like this for a couple years so I can't really think of how to reset it. Also the system restore says there are no checkpoints to go back to, which is BS but that's what it's telling me. Any ideas? Thanks.

More about : dns problem

December 28, 2012 12:29:41 AM

Before you changed everything DHCP was giving you the proper configuration when you booted your computer. When you went to static you must load all the settings manually.

You need:
IP address
Subnet mask
Default gateway - usually your router's address
and a dns server.

I like google's dns
Google public dns server IP address:

8.8.8.8
8.8.4.4

Try that.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 28, 2012 12:35:14 AM

Hangmen said:
Earlier today I tried to give my pc a static ip which i used to do all the time on windows xp without a problem. I went to ipconfig /all and basically just copied what was already there for ip and dns settings just so it wouldn't change on it's own.

Well once I hit enter on that I haven't been able to get on the internet since. I restarted the pc and went back into those settings and it had the automatic setting checked off like i didn't do anything but the internet still wouldn't work. I tried putting in some different numbers and setting it back to automatic a few times but still nothing. It says it's connected to the internet and it's uploading and downloading but I can't actually browse the internet. I looked in ipconfig and the ip is the same but the dns says: fec0:0:0:fff::1%1

I haven't really played around with computer like this for a couple years so I can't really think of how to reset it. Also the system restore says there are no checkpoints to go back to, which is BS but that's what it's telling me. Any ideas? Thanks.


You may have hosed the DNS resolver cache messing with the settings.

Go back into a command prompt (with admin rights of course) and do a ipconfig /dnsflush. You should get a response after a couple of seconds that says DSN Resolver Cache successfully flushed.

You may also want to a ipconfig /release and then an ipconfig /renew and see if you can get online again.
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December 28, 2012 1:01:39 AM

Still nothing. It said DNS Resolver Cache successfully flushed but it just seems like every time I try to change anything involving the dns it just ignores it, and it's stuck on that fec0:0:0 or whatever.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 28, 2012 1:04:17 AM

Hangmen said:
Still nothing. It said DNS Resolver Cache successfully flushed but it just seems like every time I try to change anything involving the dns it just ignores it, and it's stuck on that fec0:0:0 or whatever.


You may have thoroughly damaged the TCP/IP stack then. Go into Device Manager, Network Connections, and remove the network adapter that you are using to connect and then restart which will allow it to rebuild the TCP/IP stack.
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December 28, 2012 1:23:40 AM

Best answer selected by Hangmen.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 28, 2012 1:24:45 AM

Has anyone noticed what I think is a problem here? You set your static IP address to the same address that your router was handing out as a DHCP address! What happens when the router tries to hand out that same address again to something else? The first requirement of setting a static IP address is to make sure it is in a range that no DHCP server (router) is potentially going to assign to another device.
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December 28, 2012 1:24:51 AM

hedwar2011 said:
You may have thoroughly damaged the TCP/IP stack then. Go into Device Manager, Network Connections, and remove the network adapter that you are using to connect and then restart which will allow it to rebuild the TCP/IP stack.


Okay that worked, I just uninstalled the whole damn thing and it reset. Thanks a bunch.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 28, 2012 1:32:02 AM

mbreslin1954 said:
Has anyone noticed what I think is a problem here? You set your static IP address to the same address that your router was handing out as a DHCP address! What happens when the router tries to hand out that same address again to something else? The first requirement of setting a static IP address is to make sure it is in a range that no DHCP server (router) is potentially going to assign to another device.


You do bring up a good point but I think he may be running it through a router which in turn will allow him to set static IPs and it still resolve to the one DHCP server, but it is still something to consider.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 28, 2012 1:32:37 AM

Hangmen said:
Okay that worked, I just uninstalled the whole damn thing and it reset. Thanks a bunch.


No problem, glad to help.
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