Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

BackupBuddy won't restore, help!

Last response: in Cell Phones & Smartphones
Share
Anonymous
January 16, 2005 7:26:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

I've got BackupBuddy set to sync/backup on my old Visor, but after it just
took a dump I tried to use it to restore and it claims there's no backups.
I looked in it's dir under Visor's username and it IS backed up. Anybody
know how I can fix BB and make it see it, and restore correctly? Also,
I'd love to know why the Visor lost everything when I changed the
batteries, which it's never done before :( 
--
_____________________________________________________
For email response, or CC, please mailto:see.my.sig.4.addr(at)bigfoot.com.
Yeah, it's really a real address :) 

More about : backupbuddy restore

Anonymous
January 16, 2005 2:48:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

see.my.sig.4.addr@nowhere.com.invalid wrote:
>I've got BackupBuddy set to sync/backup on my old Visor, but after it just
>took a dump I tried to use it to restore and it claims there's no backups.

Do you have the latest version, and/or the latest version that's known
to work on the Visor? BB Tech SUpport really is your friend here.

>I'd love to know why the Visor lost everything when I changed the
>batteries, which it's never done before :( 

The backup capacitor goes bad after a number of years...
Anonymous
January 16, 2005 10:35:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

see.my.sig.4.addr@nowhere.com.invalid wrote in
news:bvmku058lqefpno73l9td7bh9tipbuhsdc@4ax.com:

> I've got BackupBuddy set to sync/backup on my old Visor, but after it
> just took a dump I tried to use it to restore and it claims there's no
> backups. I looked in it's dir under Visor's username and it IS backed
> up. Anybody know how I can fix BB and make it see it, and restore
> correctly? Also, I'd love to know why the Visor lost everything when
> I changed the batteries, which it's never done before :( 

I don't use BB, so I can't help you there. The Visor probably uses a
capacitor for holding enough charge to keep the RAM steady while changing
batteries. The Palm M1xx series with AAA batteries use the same. And
the capacitor goes bad eventually, always. When the cap goes bad, it
can't hold a charge, and when you remove the batteries, the memory is
lost. The only fix I know of is to replace either the capacitor or the
motherboard, and the latter is the only real alternative, because the
capacitors are hard to find, and often only available in lots of
thousands. http://www.pdaparts.com has Visor motherboards for either $10
or $15, depending on the model. You'll probably want the 8MB, because
why pay $10 for 2MB when you can get 8MB for $5 more? They also have
instructions for doing the replacement.

--
Regards,

Stan
Related resources
Anonymous
January 16, 2005 11:02:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.sys.palmtops.pilot,comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Stan Gosnell <murkuhn@yahoo.com> wrote:

>The only fix I know of is to replace either the capacitor or the
>motherboard,

The trouble with replacing the motherboard is that it has the same type of
capacitor as the original board and will likely eventually fail also, as some
who have tried it reported here...
Anonymous
January 19, 2005 1:40:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 20:02:10 GMT, AaronJ <noemail@noemail.com> spewed:
>>The only fix I know of is to replace either the capacitor or the
>>motherboard,
>
>The trouble with replacing the motherboard is that it has the same type of
>capacitor as the original board and will likely eventually fail also, as some
>who have tried it reported here...

Well obviously, nothing lasts forever :) 

--
_____________________________________________________
For email response, or CC, please mailto:see.my.sig.4.addr(at)bigfoot.com.
Yeah, it's really a real address :) 
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 6:25:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

see.my.sig.4.addr@nowhere.com.invalid wrote:

>On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 20:02:10 GMT, AaronJ <noemail@noemail.com> spewed:
>>>The only fix I know of is to replace either the capacitor or the
>>>motherboard,
>>
>>The trouble with replacing the motherboard is that it has the same type of
>>capacitor as the original board and will likely eventually fail also, as some
>>who have tried it reported here...
>
>Well obviously, nothing lasts forever :) 

As I recall the replacement motherboard cap failed within a few months according
to the report given here. But really, even though the defective cap syndrome is
annoying at first, it is not difficult to live with. My m125 needs a battery
change every month or so these days as I only use it on trips, and the SD card
backup returns it to normal in minutes after the battery change data loss. And
for the defective units without extension cards (such as the m100 and m105) a
hotsync will do the same...
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 10:44:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Stan Gosnell <murkuhn@yahoo.com> wrote:

>And if it's close to full, then a hotsync via serial cable takes about half
>the battery charge, with new alkalines.

If you lose half your alkalines during a hotsync you have a big problem. I'm not
sure that it's even possible to do that. With Alkalines being rated around
1100mAh the current draw to bring them down that much in 10 minutes would be,
well, unbelievable. Perhaps you exaggerate. I seldom see much of a change if any
on the icon during hotsyncs on any of my AAA models.

>Palm knew what it was doing when it stopped making units with AAA batteries.

I'm sure that Palm did know what they were doing when they stopped making AAA
units, but I doubt that it was because of the bad cap problem. For the color
models it was simply that the AAAs couldn't handle the higher current load. But
for the mono models the cap problem could have been fixed by simply getting a
new cap manufacturer, say the same one who make the caps for the PilotPro or the
IIIxe as those and other mono models didn't have a cap problem. My *guess* is
that for the mono models, the Dragonball processor was getting long in tooth and
slow of speed. Modern high speed (and higher current) ARM processors were
available. Unfortunately the current draw required for this new design would
make AAA power, if even possible, very expensive. Thus in with the wall warts
and out with the AAA's... BTW I wouldn't be surprised to see AAAs come back
(even on color models) in a few years hence as low current screen/processor
technologies improve. But then I thought the old 'B' battery would be around a
bit longer than it was too... ;) 
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 3:39:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In message <kijuu09kouv7jo5g4or0sgdr7143l0ve8a@4ax.com> AaronJ
<noemail@noemail.com> wrote:

>Stan Gosnell <murkuhn@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>And if it's close to full, then a hotsync via serial cable takes about half
>>the battery charge, with new alkalines.
>
>If you lose half your alkalines during a hotsync you have a big problem. I'm not
>sure that it's even possible to do that. With Alkalines being rated around
>1100mAh the current draw to bring them down that much in 10 minutes would be,
>well, unbelievable. Perhaps you exaggerate. I seldom see much of a change if any
>on the icon during hotsyncs on any of my AAA models.

My bet would be a calibration problem more then anything else.


--
God must love stupid people; He made so many.
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 4:56:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

AaronJ <noemail@noemail.com> wrote in
news:kijuu09kouv7jo5g4or0sgdr7143l0ve8a@4ax.com:

> If you lose half your alkalines during a hotsync you have a big
> problem. I'm not sure that it's even possible to do that. With
> Alkalines being rated around 1100mAh the current draw to bring them
> down that much in 10 minutes would be, well, unbelievable. Perhaps you
> exaggerate. I seldom see much of a change if any on the icon during
> hotsyncs on any of my AAA models.

An M105, with memory close to full, and doing a new sync via serial,
takes close to 45 minutes to sync, sometimes more. The sync is using
battery power much faster than what you'll see under normal use.

--
Regards,

Stan
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 4:56:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In message <Xns95E4CAD0A9D9Bmework@204.52.135.8> Stan Gosnell
<murkuhn@yahoo.com> wrote:

>An M105, with memory close to full, and doing a new sync via serial,
>takes close to 45 minutes to sync, sometimes more. The sync is using
>battery power much faster than what you'll see under normal use.

I've gotta ask, why is it taking 45 minutes to sync?


--
Americans couldn't be any more self-absorbed if they were made from equal
parts water and papertowel.
-- Dennis Miller
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 7:47:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

DevilsPGD <ihatespam@crazyhat.net> wrote in
news:cts0v0hjogt1cfnirorqc7p2baikg4uokk@news.octanews.com:

> I've gotta ask, why is it taking 45 minutes to sync?

Apparently it takes a long time to transfer 7 or 8 MB via serial, while
syncing every byte of it with a slow processor. I haven't used it in a
long time, but that's how long it used to take.

--
Regards,

Stan
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 7:47:57 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In message <Xns95E4E7EC043DEmework@204.52.135.8> Stan Gosnell
<murkuhn@yahoo.com> wrote:

>DevilsPGD <ihatespam@crazyhat.net> wrote in
>news:cts0v0hjogt1cfnirorqc7p2baikg4uokk@news.octanews.com:
>
>> I've gotta ask, why is it taking 45 minutes to sync?
>
>Apparently it takes a long time to transfer 7 or 8 MB via serial, while
>syncing every byte of it with a slow processor. I haven't used it in a
>long time, but that's how long it used to take.

I might be wrong, but I don't recall it taking more then 5-10 minutes to
restore my IIIxe.

A bit of math shows that if you're synchronizing at 115,200bps you're
moving between 10KB/s and 15KB/s (I forget if Palm uses 8N1 or something
different, although I'm fairly certain it's 8bit)

Even at 10KB/s, you'd only be looking at a maximum of a little over 800
seconds, or 13 minutes, to reload a Palm's memory completely.

Going from memory the serial port was the limiting factor when
installing files.

--
I see dumb people, walking around like regular people.
They don't see each other. They only see what they
wanna see. They don't know they're dumb.
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 8:10:36 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Stan Gosnell <murkuhn@yahoo.com> wrote:

>An M105, with memory close to full, and doing a new sync via serial,
>takes close to 45 minutes to sync, sometimes more. The sync is using
>battery power much faster than what you'll see under normal use.

According to Ron Nicholson's FAQ a typical mono Palm draws 50 to 60 ma max with
the cpu busy and the serial port open which is the way it would be during
hotsync. Hotsyncing for one hour at 60 ma would use 60 mAh or approximately 5%
of a full alkalines capacity. But under long constant loading alkalines don't
always get their full capacity so to be fair lets halve the normal alkaline
capacity from 1100 mAh to 550 mAh. Even here, in your stated 45 minute hotsync,
you have used 10% or less of your battery capacity.

Another problem: Why is it taking 45 minutes to hotsync? That's way too long,
even for a full memory. So a normal hotsync at half that time (or less) would
reduce your battery only about 5% which is what I see on my mono units, that is
sometimes I see a battery icon change after a hotsync and sometimes not.

Bottom line: if you really do lose half your battery during a hotsync, even a 45
minute hotsync, you probably have a defective unit...
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 11:31:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

AaronJ <noemail@noemail.com> wrote in
news:2511v051nahn7s788b3otta5s9pr5miv4a@4ax.com:

> Bottom line: if you really do lose half your battery during a hotsync,
> even a 45 minute hotsync, you probably have a defective unit...
>
Could be. Half may be an exaggeration, but it was close. I replaced the
motherboard once, and the cap went defective within a week, so I put it
in a drawer and moved on.

--
Regards,

Stan
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 6:20:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Stan Gosnell <murkuhn@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Could be. Half may be an exaggeration, but it was close. I replaced the
>motherboard once, and the cap went defective within a week, so I put it
>in a drawer and moved on.

Can't say as I blame you. That experience would make me mad too. But I think
your wrath at *all* AAA PDAs is unjustified. Most of the old mono models were
quite reliable. And they still have some advantages over modern stuff. Big on my
list is of course battery life. 30 or more hours on a battery set is great for
long trips: camping, plane, or otherwise - and no wall wart to worry about
either. Replacement batteries are easily available at the nearest convenience
store. (And in 2 years you won't need a Torx 5 wrench, soldering iron, and a
website for battery replacement.) Then, though there have been great strides in
color screens, mono screens still excel in direct sunlight. That's very
important when hiking or reading ebooks poolside in the Arizona sunshine... ;) 
!