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Mixing RIMM's Question

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  • RDRAM
  • Computers
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July 27, 2004 11:12:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Can I mix Non-ECC and ECC RDRAM ? I thought that I could but the ECC
would not operate as such but work as Non-ECC. Is this correct ? Any
problems in mixing them ? Thanks!

Mike

More about : mixing rimm question

July 28, 2004 12:29:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Correct, and additionally, if different speed modules (PC600/PC800/PC1066)
RIMMS are used together, they'll all be forced to run at the lowest speed of
the installed modules. Remember that RDRAM needs to be install in matching
pairs, and that paired modules on one channel should be rated similarly.

Hope this helps.
--
Russell Sullivan
http://tastycomputers.com

"Mike" <Mike@SunnyOrlando.com> wrote in message
news:28adg0tgeatl4f4dl25vc655r9hmq7g9fp@4ax.com...
> Can I mix Non-ECC and ECC RDRAM ? I thought that I could but the ECC
> would not operate as such but work as Non-ECC. Is this correct ? Any
> problems in mixing them ? Thanks!
>
> Mike
July 28, 2004 2:34:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 20:29:59 GMT, "Russell"
<rsullivan@tastycomputersdotcom_replace_dot_with_"."> wrote:

>Correct, and additionally, if different speed modules (PC600/PC800/PC1066)
>RIMMS are used together, they'll all be forced to run at the lowest speed of
>the installed modules. Remember that RDRAM needs to be install in matching
>pairs, and that paired modules on one channel should be rated similarly.
>
>Hope this helps.

Thanks for the info!

Mike
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Anonymous
July 28, 2004 3:29:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Is ECC any better than non ECC? My RDRAM is supposed to be ECC but shows as
non ECC in the BIOS and I can't find a way to change it.

Brian



"Mike" <Mike@SunnyOrlando.com> wrote in message
news:e2mdg09dbvb9ksgn9379thrl7bie4jfu6s@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 20:29:59 GMT, "Russell"
> <rsullivan@tastycomputersdotcom_replace_dot_with_"."> wrote:
>
> >Correct, and additionally, if different speed modules
(PC600/PC800/PC1066)
> >RIMMS are used together, they'll all be forced to run at the lowest speed
of
> >the installed modules. Remember that RDRAM needs to be install in
matching
> >pairs, and that paired modules on one channel should be rated similarly.
> >
> >Hope this helps.
>
> Thanks for the info!
>
> Mike
July 28, 2004 5:20:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

ECC mode has to be enabled or set to be auto-detected in your motherboard's
BIOS. I'm not sure whether or not your Dell BIOS will enable you to change
it or not, as most of the advanced BIOS settings in a Dell are hidden away
from prying eyes. ECC memory will check to see that all data written to and
from memory to your hard drive is always identical, at the expense of a
performance speed hit and a higher price tag for the modules, but is
normally used in mission-critical server configurations. Most
enthusiasts/gamers/casual home users/workstation users prefer non-ECC for
maximum performance.
--
Russell Sullivan
http://tastycomputers.com

"Brian K" <iibntgyea4_ remove_this_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4zBNc.19699$K53.12947@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> Is ECC any better than non ECC? My RDRAM is supposed to be ECC but shows
as
> non ECC in the BIOS and I can't find a way to change it.
>
> Brian
>
>
>
> "Mike" <Mike@SunnyOrlando.com> wrote in message
> news:e2mdg09dbvb9ksgn9379thrl7bie4jfu6s@4ax.com...
> > On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 20:29:59 GMT, "Russell"
> > <rsullivan@tastycomputersdotcom_replace_dot_with_"."> wrote:
> >
> > >Correct, and additionally, if different speed modules
> (PC600/PC800/PC1066)
> > >RIMMS are used together, they'll all be forced to run at the lowest
speed
> of
> > >the installed modules. Remember that RDRAM needs to be install in
> matching
> > >pairs, and that paired modules on one channel should be rated
similarly.
> > >
> > >Hope this helps.
> >
> > Thanks for the info!
> >
> > Mike
>
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 5:28:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Rated identically is safer. I've always used identical pairs of RIMMs in the
same channel. I have no clue what would happen if I mixed different speeds, but
same capacities, in the same channel, i.e. 128MB PC600 and 128MB PC800. I'm not
inclined to find out, altho motherboard (especially Intel's) specs will
generally provide a definitive answer... Ben Myers

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 20:29:59 GMT, "Russell"
<rsullivan@tastycomputersdotcom_replace_dot_with_"."> wrote:

>Correct, and additionally, if different speed modules (PC600/PC800/PC1066)
>RIMMS are used together, they'll all be forced to run at the lowest speed of
>the installed modules. Remember that RDRAM needs to be install in matching
>pairs, and that paired modules on one channel should be rated similarly.
>
>Hope this helps.
>--
>Russell Sullivan
>http://tastycomputers.com
>
>"Mike" <Mike@SunnyOrlando.com> wrote in message
>news:28adg0tgeatl4f4dl25vc655r9hmq7g9fp@4ax.com...
>> Can I mix Non-ECC and ECC RDRAM ? I thought that I could but the ECC
>> would not operate as such but work as Non-ECC. Is this correct ? Any
>> problems in mixing them ? Thanks!
>>
>> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 5:35:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Thanks. A most helpful answer. I won't try anymore to turn it on.

Brian




"Russell" <rsullivan@tastycomputersdotcom_replace_dot_with_"."> wrote in
message news:abDNc.169901$a24.13563@attbi_s03...
> ECC mode has to be enabled or set to be auto-detected in your
motherboard's
> BIOS. I'm not sure whether or not your Dell BIOS will enable you to
change
> it or not, as most of the advanced BIOS settings in a Dell are hidden away
> from prying eyes. ECC memory will check to see that all data written to
and
> from memory to your hard drive is always identical, at the expense of a
> performance speed hit and a higher price tag for the modules, but is
> normally used in mission-critical server configurations. Most
> enthusiasts/gamers/casual home users/workstation users prefer non-ECC for
> maximum performance.
> --
> Russell Sullivan
> http://tastycomputers.com
!