Harry Williams circa 1980 (Complete Pinball Book)

Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

I was reading the book last night and noticed that Harry Williams took
the rebound bumber of the plunger shot on a game and curved the plunger
lane to the far right of the field hitting a kickout then careening
down toward the flippers. This was a game designed in 1980 for Stern.
However I then read about a Williams game designed in 1980 also. Is
Harry Williams the same as Williams Pinball company? And if so, why
was he designing plunger lanes for Stern in 1980, when Williams was
building pins at the same time?
3 answers Last reply
More about harry williams circa 1980 complete pinball book
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    Duncan Brown covered this pinball history back in 1998:

    -- Harry Williams was out of Williams quite some time ago; I believe in

    the late 50's or early 60's. It went from his personal company to
    being
    a big corporation, eventually owned by the likes of Seeburg and Xicor.
    Many of the big names in coin-op amusmement worked there at one time or

    another, including Sam Stern and his son Gary...who left in the late
    70's when...

    -- Chicago Coin went under in the late 70's, and Sam and Gary Stern saw

    their chance to make pinball machines the way they wanted to. They
    produced the few EM machines in progress at the time (eg Rawhide and
    Stampede; and a solid-state version of Pinball which had been an EM
    under Chicago Coin) and then went on to produce only SS games. Their
    fresh, quirky attitude towards pinball can be seen in many of their ads

    of the time, some of which are just generically about pinball and not
    specifically about any one machine. (Someday I'll send my flyers to
    the
    gamearchive.com guys so they can post them and you can see what I
    mean...)

    -- One of their big coups was bringing Harry Williams out of retirement

    (I assume he was friends with the Sterns) and having him design games;
    this was also played up to a great degree in their ads. Galaxy and
    Flight 2000 are the two games I can think of right off hand, but I
    believe he did a couple of others too. If you ask me, the old guy
    still
    "had it"; Galaxy is a cool game, and while I'm not personally a big
    Flight 2000 fan, I know a lot of people who are just crazy for it.

    -- Harry Williams was out of Williams quite some time ago; I believe in

    the late 50's or early 60's. It went from his personal company to
    being
    a big corporation, eventually owned by the likes of Seeburg and Xicor.
    Many of the big names in coin-op amusmement worked there at one time or

    another, including Sam Stern and his son Gary...who left in the late
    70's when...

    -- Chicago Coin went under in the late 70's, and Sam and Gary Stern saw

    their chance to make pinball machines the way they wanted to. They
    produced the few EM machines in progress at the time (eg Rawhide and
    Stampede; and a solid-state version of Pinball which had been an EM
    under Chicago Coin) and then went on to produce only SS games. Their
    fresh, quirky attitude towards pinball can be seen in many of their ads

    of the time, some of which are just generically about pinball and not
    specifically about any one machine. (Someday I'll send my flyers to
    the
    gamearchive.com guys so they can post them and you can see what I
    mean...)

    -- One of their big coups was bringing Harry Williams out of retirement

    (I assume he was friends with the Sterns) and having him design games;
    this was also played up to a great degree in their ads. Galaxy and
    Flight 2000 are the two games I can think of right off hand, but I
    believe he did a couple of others too. If you ask me, the old guy
    still
    "had it"; Galaxy is a cool game, and while I'm not personally a big
    Flight 2000 fan, I know a lot of people who are just crazy for it.

    -Duncan, who owns more than his share of Stern pins


    DR

    pinballdoctor.com


    Natty wrote:
    > I was reading the book last night and noticed that Harry Williams took
    > the rebound bumber of the plunger shot on a game and curved the plunger
    > lane to the far right of the field hitting a kickout then careening
    > down toward the flippers. This was a game designed in 1980 for Stern.
    > However I then read about a Williams game designed in 1980 also. Is
    > Harry Williams the same as Williams Pinball company? And if so, why
    > was he designing plunger lanes for Stern in 1980, when Williams was
    > building pins at the same time?
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    The Stern pins that Harry designed:


    1978-10 Wild Fyre Stern SS 2,400

    1979-01 Dracula Stern SS 3,612

    1979-06 Hot Hand Stern SS 4,117

    1980-01 Galaxy Stern SS 5,150

    1980-03 Ali Stern SS 2,971

    1980-03 Big Game Stern SS 2,713

    1980-06 Cheetah Stern SS 1,223 Widebody
    1980-10 Flight 2000 Stern SS 6,301 Widebody

    1981-01 Freefall Stern SS 1,300 Widebody
    1981-08 Split Second Stern SS ? Widebody

    1982 Cue Stern SS ?


    DR

    pinballdoctor.com


    Dr. Dave wrote:
    > Duncan Brown covered this pinball history back in 1998:
    >
    > -- Harry Williams was out of Williams quite some time ago; I believe in
    >
    > the late 50's or early 60's. It went from his personal company to
    > being
    > a big corporation, eventually owned by the likes of Seeburg and Xicor.
    > Many of the big names in coin-op amusmement worked there at one time or
    >
    > another, including Sam Stern and his son Gary...who left in the late
    > 70's when...
    >
    > -- Chicago Coin went under in the late 70's, and Sam and Gary Stern saw
    >
    > their chance to make pinball machines the way they wanted to. They
    > produced the few EM machines in progress at the time (eg Rawhide and
    > Stampede; and a solid-state version of Pinball which had been an EM
    > under Chicago Coin) and then went on to produce only SS games. Their
    > fresh, quirky attitude towards pinball can be seen in many of their ads
    >
    > of the time, some of which are just generically about pinball and not
    > specifically about any one machine. (Someday I'll send my flyers to
    > the
    > gamearchive.com guys so they can post them and you can see what I
    > mean...)
    >
    > -- One of their big coups was bringing Harry Williams out of retirement
    >
    > (I assume he was friends with the Sterns) and having him design games;
    > this was also played up to a great degree in their ads. Galaxy and
    > Flight 2000 are the two games I can think of right off hand, but I
    > believe he did a couple of others too. If you ask me, the old guy
    > still
    > "had it"; Galaxy is a cool game, and while I'm not personally a big
    > Flight 2000 fan, I know a lot of people who are just crazy for it.
    >
    > -- Harry Williams was out of Williams quite some time ago; I believe in
    >
    > the late 50's or early 60's. It went from his personal company to
    > being
    > a big corporation, eventually owned by the likes of Seeburg and Xicor.
    > Many of the big names in coin-op amusmement worked there at one time or
    >
    > another, including Sam Stern and his son Gary...who left in the late
    > 70's when...
    >
    > -- Chicago Coin went under in the late 70's, and Sam and Gary Stern saw
    >
    > their chance to make pinball machines the way they wanted to. They
    > produced the few EM machines in progress at the time (eg Rawhide and
    > Stampede; and a solid-state version of Pinball which had been an EM
    > under Chicago Coin) and then went on to produce only SS games. Their
    > fresh, quirky attitude towards pinball can be seen in many of their ads
    >
    > of the time, some of which are just generically about pinball and not
    > specifically about any one machine. (Someday I'll send my flyers to
    > the
    > gamearchive.com guys so they can post them and you can see what I
    > mean...)
    >
    > -- One of their big coups was bringing Harry Williams out of retirement
    >
    > (I assume he was friends with the Sterns) and having him design games;
    > this was also played up to a great degree in their ads. Galaxy and
    > Flight 2000 are the two games I can think of right off hand, but I
    > believe he did a couple of others too. If you ask me, the old guy
    > still
    > "had it"; Galaxy is a cool game, and while I'm not personally a big
    > Flight 2000 fan, I know a lot of people who are just crazy for it.
    >
    > -Duncan, who owns more than his share of Stern pins
    >
    >
    > DR
    >
    > pinballdoctor.com
    >
    >
    > Natty wrote:
    > > I was reading the book last night and noticed that Harry Williams took
    > > the rebound bumber of the plunger shot on a game and curved the plunger
    > > lane to the far right of the field hitting a kickout then careening
    > > down toward the flippers. This was a game designed in 1980 for Stern.
    > > However I then read about a Williams game designed in 1980 also. Is
    > > Harry Williams the same as Williams Pinball company? And if so, why
    > > was he designing plunger lanes for Stern in 1980, when Williams was
    > > building pins at the same time?
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.pinball (More info?)

    "Natty" wrote:
    > I was reading the book last night and noticed that Harry Williams took
    > the rebound bumber of the plunger shot on a game and curved the plunger
    > lane to the far right of the field hitting a kickout then careening
    > down toward the flippers. This was a game designed in 1980 for Stern.
    > However I then read about a Williams game designed in 1980 also. Is
    > Harry Williams the same as Williams Pinball company? And if so, why
    > was he designing plunger lanes for Stern in 1980, when Williams was
    > building pins at the same time?

    This was Stern's "Galaxy" pinball. Designed by Harry Williams. Yes- Harry
    was founder of Williams Electronics. After retiring/leaving Williams
    Electronics, he helped design a few games for Stern Electronics in the early
    1980's (Williams Electronics competitor). I don't know much further detail
    about his situation at that time, but maybe someone else can fill in the
    blanks...

    Ray J.
    --
    Action Pinball & Amusement, LLC
    Salt Lake City, Utah USA
    Web: www.actionpinball.com

    We're serious about pinball. Anything else is just for fun!
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