Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Help K6-3 Retail Heat Sink

Last response: in CPUs
Share
November 30, 2000 5:04:12 PM

Hey- I have a retail k6-3 450 running at 475, woa!! Major performance gain there!!! Anyway, what I want to know, is there a way to seperate the chip from the heat sink it came with so I can put a better heat sink on there and up the performance a bit more?

"Are you saying that I can dodge bullets?"

More about : retail heat sink

November 30, 2000 8:23:12 PM

Do you need more info? Come on guys I'm sure this is an easy one. I know you all can help out. Thanks in advance.

"Are you saying that I can dodge bullets?"
November 30, 2000 9:03:26 PM

I'm sure it is a normal clip on deal. If so you just have to undo the clamping mechanism and put on a new one. Shouldn't be a big deal. Nice job OCing that thing. I have an original K6-3 400 and can't get anything more out of it.

Jon
"Water-Cooled CPU Runner"
Related resources
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
December 1, 2000 12:24:50 AM

The heat sink is usually clipped to the motherboard, and the fan is (screwed) to the heat sink. The "heat sink & fan" combo is pasted to the CPU with some kind of thermal paste or thermal conducting tape.

Either way, once the HS&F are unclipped from the motherboard, you should be able to pry the CPU from the base of the heat sink (CAREFULLY!).

Cleaning the bottom of the heat sink is a good idea before reusing it on a new CPU, and I would recommend spending a couple of bucks for a good thermal compound between the new CPU and the heat sink (to replace the old stuff).


<font color=green>Buy, build, abuse, and replace... </font color=green>
What else is there? :wink:
December 1, 2000 5:21:42 AM

thanks, as long as it's pryable then I will do my best to pry it off. I just wanted to make sure it could be done. You all rock

Josh

"Are you saying that I can dodge bullets?"
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
December 2, 2000 12:12:26 PM

i also have a new k6-3 450 that won't come off.
first do not pry,you could pop the metal cooling plate off the cpu.
it is not held on by grease or even the usual thermal pad.
it is held on by some very hard type of glue/thermal transfer compund that feels like it is made of ceramic.
i have tried to cut it with a razorblade and it didn't seem to have any effect.
remeber, if you are trying to cut that, that the razor blade should be inserted betwen the metal cooling plate and the heat sink and not the heat plate and the cpu.
if you pop off the metal cap which has direct contact with the core, you could destroy it.
i spent way too much to buy this cpu just because i always had a fetish to try to get one to 500mghz. so i don't want to take a chance on breaking it.
if anyone knows the answer to this question, i would like to know it also. many passes with a razor blade failed to make any detectable progress with this very hard heat sink glue/heat transfer stuff. i din't want to keep trying to cut it since it wasn't doing anything. worst case would be cutting a groove around the glue and then not being able to cut it lose completely,which would reduce the size of the heat trasfer patch causing it to overheat. although breaking the cpu or poppin the heat plate or breaking the cpu might top that. if i knew it could be done and that someone had done it,then iwould continue going round and round with a razor blade for the next 2 weeks because i believe if i could water cool it i could get it to do 500 stable. the other thing might be to make a cooling device for the mb l3 cache as that seems like a road block to higher speeds as well.
btw mine is running at 4.5 x 105 for 472.5
i was able also to get the fsb to 110 and 115 but had to turn off l3 cache and reduce mghz to do it, altough at around 440 and 115fsb it was almost as fast as 472.5.
crippling the L2&L3 cache is not a real overclocking option
as the higher mghz does not make of for the performance hit of doing that. good luck. greg lee
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
December 2, 2000 12:20:46 PM

i have had 2 k6-3 400's and they both did 450 with ease.
one was a 2.4 volt that i ran at 2.3 and the second later one was a 2.2 volt that i also ran at 450.
i have read messages from people who said the ran them at as high as 2.9 or 3 volts for an extended burn in period and the set the voltage down later and it remained able to run at the higher speed after the burn in tho.
most people say you should not exceed 2.5 for safety tho.
paid to much for last one after they stopped making them(the 450 model) to take a chnce on mine. at least not until it gets closer to time for me to upgrade to athlon and ddr ram.
December 2, 2000 10:32:56 PM

Thanks for the Info. THis is really the answer I was looking for. I was beginning to believe I was the only one with a stuborn ass heat sink. So I'll leave this open then still to anyone who has successfully removed an amd k6-3 RETAIL heat sink from the chip, please let me and vic201 know how you did it.

Josh

"Are you saying that I can dodge bullets?"
December 3, 2000 1:16:49 AM

How you getting to 475? If 95 x 5 you really haven't gained anything in performance. What you gained in cpu mhz you lost in the fact your memory is now running at 95 mhz and your graphics are slightly slower too. Other than looking a little better at post you really haven't gained anything so I advise to set back to originall settings and not take the chance on damaging that chip. Do you have any settings on your motherboard higher than 100 fsb? I take it that the it won't run at 500, not many k6-3's do. The 350 and 400 k6-3's do seem to overclock a little better though. Seems the second level cache on the k6-3's hit a wall a much above 450.

A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing!
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
December 3, 2000 5:55:50 AM

i should have bought oem,but retail is usually considered to be of a higher quality.(oem comes without heat sink)
i didn't know it would be a problem till i got it, all the others (retail)had a thermal pad that a litle work with a razor and some cleaning solvent could take care of.
this stuff is like rock!
i have considered taking the fan off and enclosing the whole heat sink and running water through it it.
i really don't think it (the heat sink)can be gotten off safely and i don't want to carve it up to fit in a water cooling housing if it's not going to do any good.
if it ran for a while and the messed up later and seemed to be overheating i might try, but the temperature on this asus p5ab board said it never got over 104f.
probably not worth the bother and the risk.
good luck. greg
i''l make sure my athelon doesn't have a heat sink put on with concrete before i order one.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
December 3, 2000 4:33:26 PM

I removed the heatsink by using a razor blade to cut through the glue. I rocked it back and forth on each corner, and little by little it went further in. Eventually I could pry it off without using too much force. I also froze the cpu to make the glue brittle, but I don't know if that made a difference.
I have heard about making the glue soft. To heat the glue unplug the heatsink fan, unclip the heatsink from the socket, and turn the computer on.
This seems risky to me.
Here is an article about removing the cpu cap from <A HREF="http://www.deeztech.com/" target="_new">DeezTech</A>:
<A HREF="http://www.deeztech.com/archarticle.cfm?article=10&page..." target="_new">Direct Cooling At Its Best!!</A>
December 4, 2000 2:35:21 AM

if you really must be technical- other than the fun just in doing it overclocking, moving the k63 to 475 brings a performance boost of 5.555555...%. Of course the slower ram and graphics bring a 5% loss on that bus. So over all system performance would seem to have increased a whopping .55555% Like I said in my intro to this discussion whoa!! Whatta boost.

"Are you saying that I can dodge bullets?"
!