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MT3707 with VT-x

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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November 9, 2010 2:25:24 AM

hello,

I have a gateway MT3707 notebook, it has an Intel core duo 1.66ghz CPU. CPUZ says that the processor supports VT-x (virtualization technology) does anyone know if the notebook mobo supports this too?, i looked in the bios for a setting to turn it on but its not in the bios for this one, i read on another forum that some oem notebooks are sent out with this setting active all the time with no bios settings to change. Is it possible gateway did that with this one?.gateways site has no info on this subject so hopefully someone else does.

More about : mt3707

November 9, 2010 2:51:25 AM

i ran the program to test if the laptop supports VT-x, it says that it does but needs to be enabled, since i can't do it through the bios is there any programs that can enable this for me? :??: 
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 9, 2010 4:28:18 AM

I thought only Vaio was crap enough to lock VT-x as off and show the middle finger to its customers. It could be that Gateway already posted a BIOS Update (ask) and you just need to follow the instructions. The other way is by entering BIOS during start-up and find the correct menu where it says: VT-x: Enable/Disable.

Telling us that you have Intel core duo 1.66ghz CPU is of no use. You have to say whether it's a T??00, then check its intel information page for VT-x feature.

In VAIO, you have to reboot in DOS-Mode (using an external USB memory stick), and use a program called symcmos to change the CMOS:
1) Read its content to the memory stick with this command: symcmos -v2 -lcmos.sav
2) Open the file cmos.sav (using the dos command Edit), change the correct register value and save.
3) Write the modified file back to the CMOS: symcmos -v2 -ucmos.sav

But the above is for Phoenix bios (and I got mine updated to correct version before attempting the above). Did lots of research on it esp in VMware forums. Turns out in my case, BIOS R0200J6 needs regsiter (0195) flipped from [0000] to [0001]. First boot didn't pick it up but 2nd one was ok. I used a little program called Securable to test that VT-x was enabled.

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November 10, 2010 1:59:17 AM

Quote:
I thought only Vaio was crap enough to lock VT-x as off and show the middle finger to its customers. It could be that Gateway already posted a BIOS Update (ask) and you just need to follow the instructions. The other way is by entering BIOS during start-up and find the correct menu where it says: VT-x: Enable/Disable.

Telling us that you have Intel core duo 1.66ghz CPU is of no use. You have to say whether it's a T??00, then check its intel information page for VT-x feature.

In VAIO, you have to reboot in DOS-Mode (using an external USB memory stick), and use a program called symcmos to change the CMOS:
1) Read its content to the memory stick with this command: symcmos -v2 -lcmos.sav
2) Open the file cmos.sav (using the dos command Edit), change the correct register value and save.
3) Write the modified file back to the CMOS: symcmos -v2 -ucmos.sav

But the above is for Phoenix bios (and I got mine updated to correct version before attempting the above). Did lots of research on it esp in VMware forums. Turns out in my case, BIOS R0200J6 needs regsiter (0195) flipped from [0000] to [0001]. First boot didn't pick it up but 2nd one was ok. I used a little program called Securable to test that VT-x was enabled.



Sorry, CPUZ says the processor is an Intel core duo T2300 (Yonah) Socket 479mPGA, instruction set is MMX,SSE(1,2,3) VT-x, so i know the processor is capeable of runnig the virtual modes, I just don't know if the motherboard can do it. I have not had any luck at all finding out what kind of motherboard is in this notebook,the only info i have been able to gather is it has an ATI RS400/RC400/RC410 Chipset With a SB400 Southbridge, it also runs a Phoenix Trustedcore bios version 83.10 ( which is the newest one on gateways website) im gonna search around a bit to see if the chipset can support it, but that will still leave the problem of enableing it, since the bios has no option for doing so. i will have to do some research before i do any editing to the CMOS, I"ve done a great many things with computers but system and program editing is not one of them.
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