Building Campaign settings?

Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

Is it better to build small areas in detail and them put them all togeather
or to create the entire world, and then design in detail?
7 answers Last reply
More about building campaign settings
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

    Kaynith wrote:
    >
    > Is it better to build small areas in detail and them put them all togeather

    yes.

    > or to create the entire world, and then design in detail?

    too grand a scheme. I tried it this way with my recent campaign, and far
    too many areas are underdeveloped (the party likes to travel)

    it's good to know where your grand scheme is going, but worry about it
    country/area by country/area.

    IMO, anyway.

    --
    Gene Poole

    Signature sold separately
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

    Kaynith wrote:
    > Is it better to build small areas in detail and them put them all togeather
    > or to create the entire world, and then design in detail?

    Everything depnds on how you do handle your NPCs, but I think it's always good
    to make the base design of the world where you place the most important
    objects, then design the areas where the campaign will start and of course the
    areas closest around.

    If you have got this far, then you need "only" create new areas a bit ahead of
    time when needed.

    But of course the best is to create the whole world, it's history first, this
    way you don't have to just make up important information on the fly during the
    gameplay.


    //Aho
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

    "J.O. Aho" <user@example.net> wrote in message
    news:c55dgb$2ntptd$1@ID-130698.news.uni-berlin.de...
    | Kaynith wrote:
    | > Is it better to build small areas in detail and them put them all
    togeather
    | > or to create the entire world, and then design in detail?
    |
    | Everything depnds on how you do handle your NPCs, but I think it's always
    good
    | to make the base design of the world where you place the most important
    | objects, then design the areas where the campaign will start and of
    course the
    | areas closest around.
    |
    | If you have got this far, then you need "only" create new areas a bit
    ahead of
    | time when needed.
    |
    | But of course the best is to create the whole world, it's history first,
    this
    | way you don't have to just make up important information on the fly
    during the
    | gameplay.

    But if you opt for the make it up as you go along from a small area and
    build from there, fleshing out NPC's and lore as they move about. Make sure
    you take clear notes and write down the important NPC's and what they know.
    You never know when the players may go back to the individual or if they
    will be brought back in at a later time in the game. And when you have time
    after the game ends till the next session, build on what you have created
    in the last session and work from it. If it was an excellent lore bit, work
    on it some more, even if you don't plan on using it right away, at least
    you have fleshed it out some and have it ready when you do decide to use
    it. The flesh out method seems to work very well in my game in areas that I
    haven't detailed in the beginning and it allows to keep the idea that I
    just introduced fresh in my mind to build on it from there or decide that
    it wasn't something prevelant to any future event. But a notebook to scribe
    in your ideas during the fly, is a great tool to have. Good luck and
    journey well!

    --
    Tarrax Ironwolf
    psyberwolfREM@VEiwon.com
    -------
    "We played Dungeons & Dragons for three hours! Then I was slain by an
    elf." -- Homer Simpson
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

    Tarrax Ironwolf wrote:

    > But if you opt for the make it up as you go along from a small area and
    > build from there, fleshing out NPC's and lore as they move about. Make sure
    > you take clear notes and write down the important NPC's and what they know.
    > You never know when the players may go back to the individual or if they
    > will be brought back in at a later time in the game. And when you have time
    > after the game ends till the next session, build on what you have created
    > in the last session and work from it. If it was an excellent lore bit, work
    > on it some more, even if you don't plan on using it right away, at least
    > you have fleshed it out some and have it ready when you do decide to use
    > it. The flesh out method seems to work very well in my game in areas that I
    > haven't detailed in the beginning and it allows to keep the idea that I
    > just introduced fresh in my mind to build on it from there or decide that
    > it wasn't something prevelant to any future event. But a notebook to scribe
    > in your ideas during the fly, is a great tool to have. Good luck and
    > journey well!

    I must say that I'm not that much for creating up things during playtime, as
    thise usually are less good than when you have had the time to think and try a
    bit different options. IMHO everything should be prepared for the current play
    session, I don't mean only the persons that you have thought of that the PCs
    would meet, but all the "important" characters that are in the area and that
    the PCs would think of going to ask or so... In the same manner the local
    history needs to have a read line that can be used, as you will never know
    what your players will ask and want to know more about and those things may
    have nothing to do with the adventure.

    //Aho
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

    "J.O. Aho" <user@example.net> wrote in message
    news:c55dgb$2ntptd$1@ID-130698.news.uni-berlin.de...
    > Kaynith wrote:
    > > Is it better to build small areas in detail and them put them all
    togeather
    > > or to create the entire world, and then design in detail?
    >
    > Everything depnds on how you do handle your NPCs, but I think it's always
    good
    > to make the base design of the world where you place the most important
    > objects, then design the areas where the campaign will start and of course
    the
    > areas closest around.
    >
    > If you have got this far, then you need "only" create new areas a bit
    ahead of
    > time when needed.
    >
    > But of course the best is to create the whole world, it's history first,
    this
    > way you don't have to just make up important information on the fly during
    the
    > gameplay.

    This is good advice. When I go about creating a world I start with some
    basic ideas and then build the framework - worldmap larger than they are
    likely to travel in within the first year, some major characters and of
    course cities and towns. I then build incrementally and thematically. So if
    I have a quest or mission then I identify where that will take them, I note
    anything along the way that might distract them (sometimes working
    distractions from things I don't want to develop yet). The biggest
    distractions that I feel you should prepare are cities and towns -
    adventurers usually want to replenish their stocks. So basically I jot out a
    few notes about each city or town near their current mission. I rate the
    likelyhood of things like magic shops, weaponssmiths, leather workers, etc.
    Then go on to flesh the rest of the mission out (dungeon, keep, baddies,
    etc.)

    Each time they travel off in a direction I revisit and renew the
    distractions until they are properly fleshed out. I can do this in tandem
    with the adventure and it lets the settings evolve as the campaign evolves.
    It also lets me weave plots and subplots into everything, which makes the
    adventure more enjoyable for everyone. It also lets me spring up new sites
    fairly easily within the current framework without arousing suspicions that
    the site wasn't there to begin with.

    Currently I have the worldmap 80% fleshed out in our current campaign, and
    have some prep on the next chunk of worldmap. No shortage of adventure
    (we've been playing this one for almost 2 years now I think).

    peace,
    Frank
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

    One other thing I found helpful is building a Who's Who guide to my world. I
    keep it handy and reuse people as much as possible. You should see them when
    they feel they've heard a name before and go digging through their notes -
    keeps them on their toes.

    Also at the first of each session I have the players recount the last
    session (over the campfire if possible). This lets me know how they
    interpreted the events - it is usually quite different than what I had
    intended :-)

    Frank
  7. Archived from groups: alt.games.adnd (More info?)

    Thanks again guys...It's been a long time since I've built a campaign...I'm
    getting the hang off it again...
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