Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is computer science a good option for me?

Last response: in Work & Education
Share
September 5, 2012 3:01:12 PM

I'm in the eleventh grade and I was thinking of doing computer science after my 12th.

The thing is I'm really not sure if its a good idea for me because I have never done programming before so I'm not sure if its something I will enjoy.

I wanted to do something with technology but I'm not sure what. I always wanted to design websites and other things and people told me do computer science.

I was also confused if I should do a minor in computer science and major in business. Is that a good option?

Thanks a lot!!

More about : computer science good option

September 5, 2012 3:03:25 PM

Its up to you what you want to do, if the topics in minor suit you chose minor, the same for major.

m
0
l
September 5, 2012 3:09:14 PM

Look into an Information Technology program, very highly sought after major and I assume most schools (mine did at least) offer paths through the major that are less programming heavy. For example, I did much more in SQL than I did in any other programming language, although I had the option to specialize in Databases, Network Security, or Programming/Development.
m
0
l
Related resources
September 5, 2012 3:14:15 PM

After high school going into college your going to have to get your basics before even worrying about a specific degree. Most people change their desired degrees at least 3 to 4 times while in school. When you start your Gen Ed classes take a graphic arts class like Photoshop 101 and take a basic networking, database, programming class from the Computer Science field. The best way to learn if it's what you want to do is dive in and see if you enjoy what your learning. Myself... I started with computer science switched to graphic arts got an associates then switched back to computer science and finished with an emphasis on networking. This was all after starting college going into facilities management :) . Your young and have many many options available. Just start playing around and see what your niche is ;) .
m
0
l
September 5, 2012 4:07:33 PM

If you have strong math skills consider a degree in Electrical Engineering. It will give you a greater selection of career paths. When I say strong math, I mean good with Algebra & Calculus. Programming will still be a good part of that.
m
0
l
September 5, 2012 4:30:38 PM

You don't need any special math mojo for electrical engineering in general. But don't take any engineering discipline if you absolutely hate math :lol: 
m
0
l
September 5, 2012 4:39:18 PM

If you have to ask, then the answer is almost certainly, "NO".

If you are geeky enough to do Computer Science, you should have already done programming of some sort, off your own back.

This lack of programming effort suggests to me that you should work out what you truly love or have a great interest in, and pursue that.
m
0
l
September 5, 2012 5:39:03 PM

A strange topic for this forum, but I'll chime in, because I don't agree with much that has been said so far.

I'd say Computer Science is an excellent choice for a major. As others have said, you can always change later, but what most people missed is that Computer Science is one of the hardest majors to change into. That's because it tends to be a pretty popular field. If you come in with a C.S. major you can usually stay as long as you keep up a C average, but if you picked a different major coming in, then you'll need mostly A's to transfer to it (at least this was true at the universities I attended).

Another big plus about C.S. is that you are learning to do something that is in demand. There are a lot of jobs for programmers out there, and by getting a degree in C.S. you are opening up a lot of employment opportunities. I don't have a degree in Business Admin, but my guess is that it is harder for companies to figure out what to do with you after an bachelor's in Business Admin. You are not likely to go straight into management.

Of course, if you try out C.S. and you find that you hate it, then you should definately switch to a different major. As for those who say if you loved C.S. you'd already be programming, I disagree. I did not do any real programming until college, and I found that I love the field.

On another note, you may want to consider the difference between a C.S. degree and a degree in Computer Engineering or E.E.C.S. The difference is usually that C.S. is lumped with sciences like Physics, Math, and Biology, whereas Computer Engineering or E.E.C.S. is lumped with the Engineering disciplines like Electrical Engineering and Civil Engineering. Either way, you'll learn how to program, but which major you choose will likely have a big impact on the non-C.S. required coursework. Engineers tend to focus on applied math and physics, with a small amount of general education whereas the sciences get more general education in writing and abstract thinking.
m
0
l
September 5, 2012 7:31:35 PM

I went for computer science for 2 semesters, it was really dry for me.
But sure, if you are interested go for it.
m
0
l
September 5, 2012 10:29:50 PM

Well here at work we get all kinds of applicants with 4yr degreees and lots of experience ... applying for jobs that are entry level or 2 yr degrees. I also know several people with 4yr CS degrees and no experience that can't find any work at all. Unless you speak Chinese or Japanese I would say that any CS degree is going to be a waste of time. With the advent of cloud computing and Virtualized desktops, even support positions are going to diminish.

If I had to recommend a specific job to go for I would suggest a Physicians Assistant. Great Pay, Great benefits, less schooling, lots of jobs out there, and none of the crap that Dr's go thru to be a Dr.
m
0
l
September 5, 2012 10:48:47 PM

Why do you need someone else to tell you what you should do?

Go try it!

If you're still in High school, maybe you go take a course.
Otherwise, in your own time there's some intro lessons directed towards beginners on khan academy.

Don't worry about your career just yet, you have some opportunities to try different things and find what you can do better than other people (and what you might like).

It maybe obvious, but if you choose a career based on what natural talent you have, this gives you a leap up in that field to succeed.


Computer programmers are highly desired, but you have to compete and the knowledge changes frequently.
The above person saying he knows people with 4year cs degrees who can't find work is probably true and I don't doubt it. But it's also because those friends may have a piece of paper saying they should computer programming, but flunked the interviews and really know less than some guy from India or China. Tons of programming jobs out there including entry level college grad; but unlike other professions you need to prove you know your stuff and be tested on it right there, not just have a piece of paper with your list of accomplishments.
m
0
l
September 6, 2012 12:04:26 AM

I never said that a degree in CS guaranteed a job, but it certainly provides a lot of opportunities. For example, the company I work for, Intel, currently has 192 job openings in the USA for software engineers with a 4 year college degree.

Disclaimer: My opinions are my own. I do not speak for Intel.
m
0
l
September 6, 2012 12:12:11 AM

Quote:
If you have to ask, then the answer is almost certainly, "NO".

If you are geeky enough to do Computer Science, you should have already done programming of some sort, off your own back.

This lack of programming effort suggests to me that you should work out what you truly love or have a great interest in, and pursue that.


To have a Computer Science major you only have to be smart, not have programmed a full C compiler in your free time before hand.

And, please be noticed... the Computer Science/Engineering degree IS NOT AN INFORMATION of/in TECHNOLOGIES major or degree. Computer Science is HARD to get, but you'll be guaranteed to have a very good job in the end, since it's a really hard spot to fill all the time. You'll get much much more than just "programming skillz" in there. You'll get to know how a computer does its magic from the ground up and be able to design and implement chips and software along. If you want the short rundown, it's about investigation in a lot of ways and put that into practice with programs.

Anyway, if you're smart enough to graduate from Computer Science/Engineering, you'll be able to get almost any degree afterwards. I'd say Electrical Engineering is harder, but about the same in satisfaction, hahaha.

Cheers!
m
0
l
September 6, 2012 12:27:12 AM

above is a stereotype and not entirely correct.

Better way to think of it is more like a depth chart. The closer you get to hardware like EE, you need to have deeper established knowledge, which require deeper skill trees and prereqs to understand what is going on and you end up doing "less" but you do it more precisely.
The closer you are to the top you need less prerequisite knowledge, but you build bigger things.

In EE at the very lowest silicon-design level may take you 3months to design a basic chip that does a for-loop that your CS guy does in 1second, and only after you've taken like 3previous classes to prepare you with the background to understand what you are doing.

Either way it doesn't mean you are dumber or smarter.

A deep depth ee major who designs a logical unit for a chip probably would be completely terrible at making the latest iphone app, and the converse is true.

If you go for a CSE type degree, then you can consider yourself a T-bar student. You will probably learn a little about everything, but then be asked to dive somewhat deep into one area. You won't learn as much as the superstars who have focused soley on a specific area, and it doesn't indicate you are smarter or dumber than those other guys either.
m
0
l
September 6, 2012 12:55:30 AM

Ah, sorry, the "smarter" qualitative was a little free on my part. I was just trying to illustrate that, although you don't have to be an "Einstein" to get it, you will have to work hard for it: study, understand and execute; that's not a trivial sequence under any light.

And I do consider EE harder than SCE, but that's jut me... Well, it could have been the fact that my friends in EE had to work 24/7 in labs and studying for their degree while i just programmed at home having Earl Gray :p 

Cheers!

EDIT: Typo
m
0
l
September 6, 2012 1:18:01 AM

I used to be the hiring coordinator for my company, setting up job fairs, on-campus and college recruiting trips, booth & poster and brochure designs, even specifying what laptops and software for the recruiting teams to take out on trips. All that in my "spare time" from being a manager :p .. Anyway, we mainly hire engineers, specifically electrical and computer engineers, as well as MEs, some CEs, etc. We also hire a few CS candidates, but I can attest from years of experience that we always have many more CS candidates than job openings, whereas the EE and CE openings are considerably harder to fill.

m
0
l
September 6, 2012 6:11:06 AM

Quote:
I used to be the hiring coordinator for my company, setting up job fairs, on-campus and college recruiting trips, booth & poster and brochure designs, even specifying what laptops and software for the recruiting teams to take out on trips. All that in my "spare time" from being a manager :p .. Anyway, we mainly hire engineers, specifically electrical and computer engineers, as well as MEs, some CEs, etc. We also hire a few CS candidates, but I can attest from years of experience that we always have many more CS candidates than job openings, whereas the EE and CE openings are considerably harder to fill.


This is because likely you are working for a hardware company .
The complete reverse would be true for a company that produces software.
m
0
l
September 6, 2012 10:46:28 PM

? how do you derive that from what she said?

What I read into it is that there CS people who cant find jobs and apply everywhere theres openings. Kinda what we see here.
m
0
l
September 6, 2012 11:07:23 PM

Quote:
? how do you derive that from what she said?

What I read into it is that there CS people who cant find jobs and apply everywhere theres openings. Kinda what we see here.


are you sincerely interested in my thoughts?

because really I don't think it'll help the OP, but if you truly are interested I'll type something up; but if you just wanted to debate on what i wrote, I'll leave it be.
m
0
l
September 7, 2012 2:30:59 AM

I think I see it now anyways, but your right, we shouldnt clutter the OP's thread
m
0
l
September 7, 2012 6:38:46 AM

This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Work & Education by Mousemonkey
m
0
l
September 20, 2012 8:39:35 AM

I think computer science is a good option for you..So you must go with computer science because before starting your career in IT or computer field it is very important to garb all the basic knowledge of the computer and if your base is not clear than how you can proceed further. After 10+2 you can do some kind of diploma course in website development..
m
0
l
!