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Normal operating temp for Core i7 740QM mobile CPU?

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November 23, 2010 5:51:19 AM

Hello,I just received my new ASUS N71Q laptop today and after running Core Temp and Real Temp I notice to my dismay that my cores are all idling in the high 50s C. Having used it for several hours now, the cores will not idle at less than the low to mid 50s. Should I return it or is this normal?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 14, 2010 5:38:23 AM

I just got an Asus G73jw A1 with an i-740qm in it. I was wondering the same thing as you. My temps idle at about 38-45c. Even rendering video from video editors, my temps have never gone above 63c.

I monitor the temps with a program called "Core Temp". It's freeware and it puts the temp of each core in the system tray in real time.

Check out this article about i7 temps. Very enlightening.

http://www.pugetsystems.com/blog/2009/02/26/intel-core-...

And here

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i7/Intel-Core%20i7%2...

At the bottom of the second link it tells you the max is 100c

But the quick answer is the cooler the better but 50C is nothing. But if I were you I would want to see what it raises to when it's really under some strain.

Try rendering some video, or use the likes of DVDShrink to REALLY compress a dvd and while the system is at work, monitor the CPU usage and temps and see what you get. Be sure the area the computer is sitting on is "normal" and not a cooling pad NOR some insulator like your lap or your bed-spread. Also a wooden desk is still an insulator. A glass or metal desk top is best. Honestly with an Asus and an i7, even under fire, the system should not go above 80c.

Good luck.
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March 25, 2011 5:04:40 PM

Quote:
I just got an Asus G73jw A1 with an i-740qm in it. I was wondering the same thing as you. My temps idle at about 38-45c. Even rendering video from video editors, my temps have never gone above 63c.

I monitor the temps with a program called "Core Temp". It's freeware and it puts the temp of each core in the system tray in real time.

Check out this article about i7 temps. Very enlightening.

http://www.pugetsystems.com/blog/2009/02/26/intel-core-...

And here

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i7/Intel-Core%20i7%2...

At the bottom of the second link it tells you the max is 100c

But the quick answer is the cooler the better but 50C is nothing. But if I were you I would want to see what it raises to when it's really under some strain.

Try rendering some video, or use the likes of DVDShrink to REALLY compress a dvd and while the system is at work, monitor the CPU usage and temps and see what you get. Be sure the area the computer is sitting on is "normal" and not a cooling pad NOR some insulator like your lap or your bed-spread. Also a wooden desk is still an insulator. A glass or metal desk top is best. Honestly with an Asus and an i7, even under fire, the system should not go above 80c.

Good luck.



Dude, Thank you so much for telling me that I shouldn't keep it over a wooden desk, but truly speaking, I have no choice. My idle's about 56-61 and when it gets load it's about 89-91. I am damn scared man. What should I do?
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March 29, 2011 11:47:01 PM

I would not worry! I have The ASUS G53JW-XA1 which idles in the 30s to 40s Celcius and while gaming it gets into the 60s and 70s but the thing is with Intel CPUs they have a overheat protection if the Motherboard is capable. If not I would use Core Temp and just keep it running in the Background! You can tell Core temp to shutdown or just Close everything if the CPU gets to a certin temprature.
I would suggest that your get something called HW Monitor on your computer, It will show fan speeds, RAM Temp, GPU Temp, CPU Temp, and How much power the Processor, GPU, and Each Fan is using.
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September 15, 2011 3:21:22 AM

My core while light surfing the net is 95 degrees. It has been freezing up for months now; even had Toshiba install a replacement hard-drive.

I thought is was a software problem (Norton upgraded me from 2011 to Norton 2012 for free.

It is a 4-month old i7 windows Ultimate 3D laptop.

Go figure.

Room temp 33 degrees. Japan summer.

Any suggestions?
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November 27, 2011 11:28:10 PM

If your using flash in your browser, it can max out your CPU which might be causing the temp spike. However, 95 degrees is bordering on extreme. Anything above 90 is something to be worried about. My old Lenovo would shut down at 90 degrees automatically. It's possible the freezing is due to your processor overheating in which case I would send it back to Toshiba.

Also, using the laptop in bed or on a soft surface can restrict air flow and heat dissipation. If it's a hot day then try to use it on a flat hard surface so air can get around the chassis.
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August 1, 2012 10:11:12 AM

95 degrees?? OMG! dude, get your laptop checked....i play crysis 2 with the gfx card disabled and the max my cpu gets is 79 degrees! i have an intel 3610qm btw.
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December 18, 2012 9:37:06 AM

I was just reading this post because Ive been experiencing problems with my new Toshiba laptop for months now (since I got it).

Its been automatically shutting down with any sort of CPU load. I got "prime95" to do a torture test and "core temp" to monitor the CPU temperature. As soon as I start the test, the CPU temp shoot up to around 90C within about 10 seconds. The computer will then shut down fast as soon as it reaches 95C which is within about a minute.

Its been back to Toshiba twice for repair (again, this is a 5 month old laptop!). Clearly they are doing something wrong with their cooling over there.

I will bring the laptop back again today and really hope they can just give me credit so I can get another brand.
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June 7, 2014 10:23:35 AM

Late responce, but still....
I own the Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU Q 740 @ 1.73GHz VAIO Laptop and have similar behavior as described above.

What I did is opened my laptop, cleaned up the old thermal paste and applied new one.
The thermal paste have to be re-applied every year (or couple years) in my opinion if you would like to have
"good maintenance" habits for your hardware. As everything else it looses its qualities over time and prevents the heatsink
to cool down the CPU as it supposed to, which causes the higher CPU temperature readings and boosting up the CPU
cooling fan to compensate for that. As a result your computer is not only hot, but noisy as well.

This may take care of the problem on a hardware level.

Furthermore you have to take care of your OS and all software you have running on the background. Monitor all processes and
clean up periodically to keep the load of the CPU lower.

I hope this helps.
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