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[Steam][RISC OS] Endless loop when using evasion

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Anonymous
March 29, 2005 12:31:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

Twice now Steamband has hung up on me when using the evasion
ability (from Acrobatics). I've managed to use it OK on
some occasions, and then other times the computer just went
into an endless hourglass and I had to reset the machine.
I'm pretty sure it's connected with evasion because it's
never happened except when the ability is activated. The
first time I was just about to step onto a scroll and the
second time I was backing away from an animal pit of some
sort with Killer Bees after me.


This was with an A5000 (RISC OS 3.1 - hence the reset, I don't
know if an Alt-Break would have cleared it) in full-screen
mode both times. I don't know if it was actually an endless
loop ot it would eventually have cleared, I only left it a
minute or so, but I couldn't see any reason for it to start
calculating and throw up the hourglass at that point so I
assume it had crashed.

--
Harriet Bazley == Loyaulte me lie ==

He who always ploughs a straight furrow is in a rut.
March 29, 2005 5:39:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

In article <dda7e2524d.harriet@freeuk.com>,
Harriet Bazley <harriet@bazley.freeuk.com> wrote:

> Twice now Steamband has hung up on me when using the evasion
> ability (from Acrobatics). I've managed to use it OK on
> some occasions, and then other times the computer just went
> into an endless hourglass and I had to reset the machine.
> I'm pretty sure it's connected with evasion because it's
> never happened except when the ability is activated. The
> first time I was just about to step onto a scroll and the
> second time I was backing away from an animal pit of some
> sort with Killer Bees after me.
>
>
> This was with an A5000 (RISC OS 3.1 - hence the reset, I don't
> know if an Alt-Break would have cleared it) in full-screen
> mode both times. I don't know if it was actually an endless
> loop ot it would eventually have cleared, I only left it a
> minute or so, but I couldn't see any reason for it to start
> calculating and throw up the hourglass at that point so I
> assume it had crashed.

Known bug. Will be fixed in 041.
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 10:29:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

<SNIP>
> Aside from which, perhaps the OP could stand to get a real operating
> system, instead of something that must be some kind of throwback to
the
> Win3.1 days, complete with "one app hangs and the whole machine has
to
> be rebooted" and other such wonderful failures of multitasking.

Pray tell,
which OS would that be ?

T.
>
> --
<SNIP>
Related resources
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 12:08:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

VALIS wrote:
>>Twice now Steamband has hung up on me when using the evasion
>>ability (from Acrobatics). I've managed to use it OK on
>>some occasions, and then other times the computer just went
>>into an endless hourglass and I had to reset the machine.
>
> Known bug. Will be fixed in 041.

Aside from which, perhaps the OP could stand to get a real operating
system, instead of something that must be some kind of throwback to the
Win3.1 days, complete with "one app hangs and the whole machine has to
be rebooted" and other such wonderful failures of multitasking.

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 1:44:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

Twisted One wrote:
> konijn_ wrote:
> > <SNIP>
> >
> >>Aside from which, perhaps the OP could stand to get a real
operating
> >>system, instead of something that must be some kind of throwback to
> >
> > the
> >
> >>Win3.1 days, complete with "one app hangs and the whole machine has
> >
> > to
> >
> >>be rebooted" and other such wonderful failures of multitasking.
> >
> >
> > Pray tell,
> > which OS would that be ?
>
> RiscOS, according to the subject line.

My bad, which OS should he change to ?

T.
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 3:06:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

konijn_ wrote:
> <SNIP>
>
>>Aside from which, perhaps the OP could stand to get a real operating
>>system, instead of something that must be some kind of throwback to
>
> the
>
>>Win3.1 days, complete with "one app hangs and the whole machine has
>
> to
>
>>be rebooted" and other such wonderful failures of multitasking.
>
>
> Pray tell,
> which OS would that be ?

RiscOS, according to the subject line.

I thought operating systems that wedged whenever one app hung went out
of style in the mid-nineties, but evidently not.

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 6:27:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

konijn_ wrote:
>>RiscOS, according to the subject line.
>
> My bad, which OS should he change to ?

Just about anything else. Even Windows ME is better behaved for God's
sake, though not by much. I'd recommend Ubuntu though.

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 6:46:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

Twisted One wrote:
> konijn_ wrote:
> >>RiscOS, according to the subject line.
> >
> > My bad, which OS should he change to ?
>
> Just about anything else. Even Windows ME is better behaved for God's

> sake, though not by much. I'd recommend Ubuntu though.
>

Try again,
Windows does definitely _not_ run on RISC.
Ubuntu does, but not on this machine.

T.

> --
> http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
> Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
> "One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
> One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 10:54:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

On 29 Mar 2005 as I do recall,
VALIS wrote:

> In article <dda7e2524d.harriet@freeuk.com>,
> Harriet Bazley <harriet@bazley.freeuk.com> wrote:
>
> > Twice now Steamband has hung up on me when using the evasion
> > ability (from Acrobatics).

[snip]
>
> Known bug. Will be fixed in 041.

Oh good. :-)

A little bug I found (someone already reported the one about wind
blowing you through closed doors): I got the 'attracts animals'
mutation, only when it happens (animals appear) the message
printed always refers to automata.


And a problem with the fullscreen mode and the extended character
descriptions - some of the descriptions turn out to be so long the
don't all fit on the terminal screen. And it's the important
information that drops off the bottom. :-(

There didn't seem to be any way of scrolling down, but that's probably
a porting issue.

--
Harriet Bazley == Loyaulte me lie ==

Time is nature's way of making sure that everything doesn't happen at once.
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 11:40:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

In article <c7CdnSmqFtdiNtTfRVn-tw@rogers.com>,
Twisted One <twisted0n3@gmail.invalid> wrote:
>konijn_ wrote:
>>>RiscOS, according to the subject line.
>>
>> My bad, which OS should he change to ?
>
>Just about anything else. Even Windows ME is better behaved for God's
>sake, though not by much. I'd recommend Ubuntu though.

There is no OS by that name.

There is a Linux distribution, but it won't run on his machine, so
it's rather a poor choice.

And there's not an OS around that can't be wedged by a program that
has control of the input devices.

Perhaps you should avoid the random bashing of OSes of which you are
not particularly knowledgable?

--
Julian Lighton jl8e@fragment.com
/* You are not expected to understand this. */
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 11:40:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

Julian Lighton wrote:
> There is a Linux distribution, but it won't run on his machine, so
> it's rather a poor choice.

Linux can be compiled for almost any architecture, so I doubt this.

> And there's not an OS around that can't be wedged by a program that
> has control of the input devices.

Linux. If you have a telnetd running and access to another box and both
have network connections. You can get in the back way and kill the
offending process.

Also, any OS that doesn't let apps have complete control of the input
devices. This probably includes Linux, and definitely includes the
Windowses with an NT kernel and HAL. That includes XP, NT, and 2K. I've
only ever had the input wedged completely on XP if a) the OS itself dies
or b) a DOS-mode app dies when it has focus. Avoid DOS-mode apps and
viruses and don't change any apps to high priority or above, and you
should be able to recover with ctrl+alt+del and task manager from a dead
app. Even a system-intensive, directx-using app that grabs the whole
screen and input devices -- I had HL2 hang on me a couple of times and
although it took a bit, it was possible to get to task manager and blow
it away and return the system to a usable state without a reboot.

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 12:52:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

In article <UdSdnQONrrfbLNTfRVn-tQ@rogers.com>, Twisted One wrote:
> Also, any OS that doesn't let apps have complete control of the input
> devices. This probably includes Linux, and definitely includes the
> Windowses with an NT kernel and HAL. That includes XP, NT, and 2K. I've
> only ever had the input wedged completely on XP if a) the OS itself dies
> or b) a DOS-mode app dies when it has focus. Avoid DOS-mode apps and
> viruses and don't change any apps to high priority or above, and you
> should be able to recover with ctrl+alt+del and task manager from a dead
> app. Even a system-intensive, directx-using app that grabs the whole
> screen and input devices -- I had HL2 hang on me a couple of times and
> although it took a bit, it was possible to get to task manager and blow
> it away and return the system to a usable state without a reboot.

Anything that hangs explorer completely enough will render 2K/XP locked up,
although the machine is still running fine, you cannot engineer any task
switching, therefore cannot get to task manager to kill explorer. Happened
this week to me.
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 6:28:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

Julian Lighton writes:
> In article <UdSdnQONrrfbLNTfRVn-tQ@rogers.com>,
> Twisted One <twisted0n3@gmail.invalid> wrote:

> > and definitely includes the
> >Windowses with an NT kernel and HAL. That includes XP, NT, and 2K.
I've
> >only ever had the input wedged completely on XP if a) the OS itself
dies
> >or b) a DOS-mode app dies when it has focus. Avoid DOS-mode apps and

> >viruses and don't change any apps to high priority or above, and you

> >should be able to recover with ctrl+alt+del and task manager from a
dead
> >app.
>
> If you avoid programs that can wedge the system hard, of course
you're
> going to not need to worry about programs wedging the system
> hard. Doesn't mean they don't exist.

That's not really fair. DOS-mode is essentially a second OS that comes
bundled with Windows. Programs actually written for Windows don't seem
to have the problem. And all anyone is really trying to show is that
giving full input device control to an application doesn't have to doom
you. Windows kind of cheats by not giving any applications full input
control, but it works. There are other ways to hose it, but as far as
I've seen, they don't really have a lot to do with input control.
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 8:07:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

Paul Murray wrote:
> Anything that hangs explorer completely enough will render 2K/XP locked up,
> although the machine is still running fine, you cannot engineer any task
> switching, therefore cannot get to task manager to kill explorer. Happened
> this week to me.

Explorer has hung on me a few times, and it's quite possible to kill it
via task manager: ctrl+alt+del, find explorer listed, end task. Then use
"Run..." in one of the task manager menus and put in "explorer". Presto:
fresh instance! Just don't ever give Explorer (or anything else) High
priority or above, or it will slow down or pre-empt the task manager if
it's in a 100% cpu use infinite loop rather than a blocked waiting for
something that will never happen hang. :) 

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 1:11:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

In article <UdSdnQONrrfbLNTfRVn-tQ@rogers.com>,
Twisted One <twisted0n3@gmail.invalid> wrote:
>Julian Lighton wrote:
>> There is a Linux distribution, but it won't run on his machine, so
>> it's rather a poor choice.
>
>Linux can be compiled for almost any architecture, so I doubt this.

If he has to build it himself, that kind of defeats the point of a
distribution, doesn't it?

I also thought Ubuntu was one of the "runs off a boot CD"
distributions, though I could be wrong about that - I stopped paying
much attention to the morass of Linux distributions a long time ago.

(And I can come up with a lot of architectures that it almost
certainly can't be built on.)

>> And there's not an OS around that can't be wedged by a program that
>> has control of the input devices.
>
>Linux. If you have a telnetd running and access to another box and both
>have network connections. You can get in the back way and kill the
>offending process.

There's a big if there - you need to have telnetd running (which you
shouldn't have). Even with sshd (safer) going, you still need another
machine on hand to get in. The average home user doesn't, so they
shouldn't have any remote connection service running, and couldn't use
it even if they did.

>Also, any OS that doesn't let apps have complete control of the input
>devices. This probably includes Linux,

Doubt it. Under normal use, you may be safe (though I's be a bit
surprised if X didn't have failure modes that hose the keyboard), but
that just makes the problem rare, not nonexistant.

> and definitely includes the
>Windowses with an NT kernel and HAL. That includes XP, NT, and 2K. I've
>only ever had the input wedged completely on XP if a) the OS itself dies
>or b) a DOS-mode app dies when it has focus. Avoid DOS-mode apps and
>viruses and don't change any apps to high priority or above, and you
>should be able to recover with ctrl+alt+del and task manager from a dead
>app.

If you avoid programs that can wedge the system hard, of course you're
going to not need to worry about programs wedging the system
hard. Doesn't mean they don't exist.

--
Julian Lighton jl8e@fragment.com
/* You are not expected to understand this. */
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 9:55:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

On 30 Mar 2005 as I do recall,
Igor D. WonderLlama wrote:

>
> Julian Lighton writes:
> > In article <UdSdnQONrrfbLNTfRVn-tQ@rogers.com>,
> > Twisted One <twisted0n3@gmail.invalid> wrote:
> > >Avoid DOS-mode apps and viruses and don't change any apps to high
> > >priority or above, and you should be able to recover with ctrl+alt+del
> > >and task manager from a dead app.
> >
> > If you avoid programs that can wedge the system hard, of course you're
> > going to not need to worry about programs wedging the system
> > hard. Doesn't mean they don't exist.
>
> That's not really fair. DOS-mode is essentially a second OS that comes
> bundled with Windows. Programs actually written for Windows don't seem
> to have the problem. And all anyone is really trying to show is that
> giving full input device control to an application doesn't have to doom
> you. Windows kind of cheats by not giving any applications full input
> control, but it works. There are other ways to hose it, but as far as
> I've seen, they don't really have a lot to do with input control.
>
The Watchdog module (Alt-Break) would almost certainly have got
me out of it. It's just that it was 'only' added to RISC OS in
1994, and my own machine predates that. :-)

--
Harriet Bazley == Loyaulte me lie ==

Eschew Obfuscation.
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 10:35:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.angband (More info?)

Harriet Bazley wrote:
> The Watchdog module (Alt-Break) would almost certainly have got
> me out of it. It's just that it was 'only' added to RISC OS in
> 1994, and my own machine predates that. :-)

That explains a few things, if the OS version and hardware you're using
are actually from the Windows 3.1 days. Might I suggest you're just a
wee bit overdue for an upgrade? ;) 

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
!