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AMD urban legends

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January 27, 2001 1:28:33 AM

AMD urban legends

1 AMD systems are hard to build and configure.
The only reason u see so many AMD question is because that is what most people are building.

2 AMD CPU’s are less stable then Intel.
I have never found any evidence on the web and my own experience is my Tbird (900 @ 1 gig) is MORE stable then my Gateway 300 PII.

3 AMD have heat problem
Yes they do run a little hotter then a PII but It’s not like if u buy a AMD system from Gateway u can’t play Quake until upgrade the heat sink. You only need a good quality HS to get the most out of OverClocking.

4 AMD chips are easily damages by changing the heatsink.
Not if u take your time and don’t force it. I have R&R heat sinks on my system a half a dozen times (trying to find the best one for OCing)with no problems.

The only reason I can see to purchase a PIII right now is for, Dual CPU’s or running apps optimized for SSE.

Just my opinion & comments welcomed.

Thx & Cya

More about : amd urban legends

January 27, 2001 5:53:33 AM

Just my opinion & comments welcomed:

"1 AMD systems are hard to build and configure"
- I agree that they are no harder to build then any other computer. However getting the VIA drivers to work was something I never want to have to go through again.

"2 AMD CPU’s are less stable then Intel"
- I have to restart my TBird-900 (not overclocked) at least once a week. My PIII-500@600 will run for... well I don't think it has EVER crashed since I installed Win2000pro. Again I blame VIA not AMD.

"3 AMD have heat problem"
- My TBird-900 runs at 42C. My PIII-500@600 runs a little over 50C. Neither have heat problems.

"4 AMD chips are easily damages by changing the heatsink"
- I've changed mine three or four times and never even thought about it.

"The only reason I can see to purchase a PIII right now is for, Dual CPU’s or running apps optimized for SSE"
Until there is a better chipset solution for AMDs I'm buying and recommending Intel. With the recent price drop PIIIs and TBirds are pretty much the same price (around here anyway).

- JW
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
January 27, 2001 9:47:07 AM

My 2 cents worth:

1 AMD systems are hard to build and configure.
When the athlon first came out 1.5 years ago, yes, but not anymore. Not for a long time now.

2 AMD CPU’s are less stable then Intel.
I run Win98 for gaming so NOTHING is stable :) 

3 AMD have heat problem
They do produce more heat, but this does not equate to heat "problems" The heatsinks can handle it with room to spare.

4 AMD chips are easily damages by changing the heatsink.
This one is interesting. In fact BOTH Intel *and* AMD flip-chips are easilly damaged by the heatsink. The flip-chip technology leaves the silicone exposed right on top of the chip for maximum thermal transfer, but this makes it more vulnerable to damage. However, appearently there have been quite a few people breaking their Athlon CPUs by trying to put PIII designed heatsinks on them, which don't fit right, thus giving AMD a bad name. Niether chip type will give you a problem if you get the right heatsink and show a little care when applying it.

The only reason I can see to purchase a PIII right now is for, Dual CPU’s or running apps optimized for SSE.
Well said, and I'll have to disagree with JCLW here. The only good chipset Intel has produced in some time now is the i815 (sorry not a rambus fan). The other chipsets for Intel procs, and the only ones to use DDR, are made by the same people that build Athlon chipsets.

Regards,
Warden
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January 27, 2001 1:18:18 PM

TBIrd's the same price as P3? I don't think so. $150 difference between the 1GHz chips is not the same.
a b à CPUs
January 27, 2001 4:38:23 PM

1- I do agree that they are a bit more trouble, but the only trouble I faced is adding up-to-date drivers and some patch. But the trouble is far worst when trying to build a Win2K system, but that mostly comes from hardware and software manufacturere's poor support for Win2K. For once MSoft has released a really descent OS and manufacturers don't give any attention. (I have to run beta video drivers and chipset drivers to get good 3D performance).

2- I do agree with JCLW, most of instability comes from the chipset, not the cpu itself, just look at how many bios upgrades there have been since the Asus A7V came out... But I like to upgrade stuff, so this is a plus for me LOL.

3- Heat problem is a big word, if you do not overclock the system, you can generaly keep the generic heat-sink. Simply make sure there is good air circulation. An intake on the front of the casiing, an outtake on the back, near the cpu and a power suply that have it's air input on the bottom (over cpu). This is the AMD recommanded setting.

4- The socket CPUs are not as thick as they used to be back in the first Pentium era and they are certanly not as thick as slot CPUs, so I think it is normal for it to be a bit more fragile. But I did put and removed my heat-sink several time and it never broke ... I even used an opinelle (french sharp carbon knife) to scrap off the pink goo on my CPU to put some silver paste and it works like a charm.

Buying AMD or Intel is probably a simple personal choice. Once you have faced any possible problems with any board, any system can be build as easily.
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