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Dimension 4400 going slow

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Last response: in Computer Brands
Anonymous
August 9, 2004 5:03:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Hello,

My Dell Dimension 4400 with WinXP is going really slow, usually taking
more than a few seconds to open web pages, start new applications,
freezing when switching desktops.

All this began to happen after I started storing digital pictures in
the HD (about 1Gig now). Browsing this newgroup a few things came to
mind

- Fan clogged with dust (computer is under the table)
- Bad HD - any ideas how to check the HD ?
- Computer warmimg up

So I tought of backing up everything and reformat/reinstall all the
stuff again.

Anyone with a similar experience?

Thanks

Fabio

More about : dimension 4400 slow

Anonymous
August 9, 2004 6:32:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On 9 Aug 2004 13:03:38 -0700, fabiogr wrote:

> Hello,
>
> My Dell Dimension 4400 with WinXP is going really slow, usually taking
> more than a few seconds to open web pages, start new applications,
> freezing when switching desktops.
>
> All this began to happen after I started storing digital pictures in
> the HD (about 1Gig now). Browsing this newgroup a few things came to
> mind
>
> - Fan clogged with dust (computer is under the table)
> - Bad HD - any ideas how to check the HD ?
> - Computer warmimg up
>
> So I tought of backing up everything and reformat/reinstall all the
> stuff again.
>
> Anyone with a similar experience?
>
> Thanks

Did you try defragmenting the hard drive? Run disk cleanup too to help
clean out unused stuff.

Dave
--
We are the US military. Your asses will be kicked. Resistance is futile.

US Army Signal Corps!
www.geocities.com/davidcasey98

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Anonymous
August 10, 2004 12:53:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"fabiogr" <fabiogr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3b3634ab.0408091203.1c5174b6@posting.google.com...
> Hello,
>
> My Dell Dimension 4400 with WinXP is going really slow, usually taking
> more than a few seconds to open web pages, start new applications,
> freezing when switching desktops.
>
> All this began to happen after I started storing digital pictures in
> the HD (about 1Gig now). Browsing this newgroup a few things came to
> mind
>
> - Fan clogged with dust (computer is under the table)
> - Bad HD - any ideas how to check the HD ?
> - Computer warmimg up
>
> So I tought of backing up everything and reformat/reinstall all the
> stuff again.
>
> Anyone with a similar experience?
>
> Thanks
>
> Fabio

Absolutely the first thing to consider when a computer begins running "slow"
is spyware, adware, trojans, or virus infection. Yes, in the past we looked
at disk fragmentation and such, but today it's all about a corrupted or
commandeered operating system.

I would suggest that you do the following, in order:

a) Visit http://www.lavasoftusa.com and download and install the free
version of AdAware. Don't bother running it just yet - just install it.

b) Visit http://www.safer-networking.org and grab Spybot Search & Destroy.
Do the same as above.

c) Make certain your anti-virus defintions are up to date.

Now, restart your computer in "Safe Mode". Run a full virus scan using your
anti-virus, followed by AdAware, followed by Spybot. Reboot the computer
normally and run both AdAware and Spybot a second time. Reboot once more.

Is it back to normal speed now?


Carmine Castiglia
Get your stuff back for less with StuffBak Labels & Tags
http://www.infosystemspro.com/ilike_004.htm
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Anonymous
August 10, 2004 1:18:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

If all these tips do not result in the computer running at somewhere near its
original speed, do the disk cleanup (as suggested by someone else), then look at
the rest of the sludge in the temporary files folder, delete the useless stuff,
THEN defrag the hard drive. Note that disk cleanup does an incomplete job.
Click Start, then Run, then enter %temp% in the run dialog box and click OK.
The resulting view of the temporary file folder for the currently logged in user
shows what is left AFTER the disk cleanup. In many cases, the leftovers are
substantial and may include web pages, GIF and JPEG images, HP inkjet printer
spooling files, and a lot of trash left behind by applications written and
tested by naive and inexperienced software development groups who fancy
themselves to be software engineers.

Also, each and every program loaded when the system starts up takes up memory,
and makes it harder for other programs to run. Each and every icon on the
desktop and in the Start->Programs menu tree also takes up more memory. Make
sure you know what each of these programs does, and remove any which you do not
use. Almost every software package installed these days thinks it is SO
important that it must be launched when your system starts up. Run MSCONFIG to
see them all... Ben Myers

On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 20:53:35 GMT, "Carmine Castiglia"
<ccastiglia@infosystemspro.com> wrote:

>"fabiogr" <fabiogr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:3b3634ab.0408091203.1c5174b6@posting.google.com...
>> Hello,
>>
>> My Dell Dimension 4400 with WinXP is going really slow, usually taking
>> more than a few seconds to open web pages, start new applications,
>> freezing when switching desktops.
>>
>> All this began to happen after I started storing digital pictures in
>> the HD (about 1Gig now). Browsing this newgroup a few things came to
>> mind
>>
>> - Fan clogged with dust (computer is under the table)
>> - Bad HD - any ideas how to check the HD ?
>> - Computer warmimg up
>>
>> So I tought of backing up everything and reformat/reinstall all the
>> stuff again.
>>
>> Anyone with a similar experience?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Fabio
>
>Absolutely the first thing to consider when a computer begins running "slow"
>is spyware, adware, trojans, or virus infection. Yes, in the past we looked
>at disk fragmentation and such, but today it's all about a corrupted or
>commandeered operating system.
>
>I would suggest that you do the following, in order:
>
> a) Visit http://www.lavasoftusa.com and download and install the free
>version of AdAware. Don't bother running it just yet - just install it.
>
> b) Visit http://www.safer-networking.org and grab Spybot Search & Destroy.
>Do the same as above.
>
> c) Make certain your anti-virus defintions are up to date.
>
>Now, restart your computer in "Safe Mode". Run a full virus scan using your
>anti-virus, followed by AdAware, followed by Spybot. Reboot the computer
>normally and run both AdAware and Spybot a second time. Reboot once more.
>
>Is it back to normal speed now?
>
>
> Carmine Castiglia
> Get your stuff back for less with StuffBak Labels & Tags
>http://www.infosystemspro.com/ilike_004.htm
>
>
>
>
August 10, 2004 1:41:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Sometimes, the easiest thing is just to re-install OS.

However, I just solved the problems with my matching by going to System
Restore, and setting the machine to two months ago, easily done in XP,
forget how its done in previous systems.






<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4117e88b.31564187@news.charter.net...
> If all these tips do not result in the computer running at somewhere near
its
> original speed, do the disk cleanup (as suggested by someone else), then
look at
> the rest of the sludge in the temporary files folder, delete the useless
stuff,
> THEN defrag the hard drive. Note that disk cleanup does an incomplete
job.
> Click Start, then Run, then enter %temp% in the run dialog box and click
OK.
> The resulting view of the temporary file folder for the currently logged
in user
> shows what is left AFTER the disk cleanup. In many cases, the leftovers
are
> substantial and may include web pages, GIF and JPEG images, HP inkjet
printer
> spooling files, and a lot of trash left behind by applications written and
> tested by naive and inexperienced software development groups who fancy
> themselves to be software engineers.
>
> Also, each and every program loaded when the system starts up takes up
memory,
> and makes it harder for other programs to run. Each and every icon on the
> desktop and in the Start->Programs menu tree also takes up more memory.
Make
> sure you know what each of these programs does, and remove any which you
do not
> use. Almost every software package installed these days thinks it is SO
> important that it must be launched when your system starts up. Run
MSCONFIG to
> see them all... Ben Myers
>
> On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 20:53:35 GMT, "Carmine Castiglia"
> <ccastiglia@infosystemspro.com> wrote:
>
> >"fabiogr" <fabiogr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> >news:3b3634ab.0408091203.1c5174b6@posting.google.com...
> >> Hello,
> >>
> >> My Dell Dimension 4400 with WinXP is going really slow, usually taking
> >> more than a few seconds to open web pages, start new applications,
> >> freezing when switching desktops.
> >>
> >> All this began to happen after I started storing digital pictures in
> >> the HD (about 1Gig now). Browsing this newgroup a few things came to
> >> mind
> >>
> >> - Fan clogged with dust (computer is under the table)
> >> - Bad HD - any ideas how to check the HD ?
> >> - Computer warmimg up
> >>
> >> So I tought of backing up everything and reformat/reinstall all the
> >> stuff again.
> >>
> >> Anyone with a similar experience?
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >>
> >> Fabio
> >
> >Absolutely the first thing to consider when a computer begins running
"slow"
> >is spyware, adware, trojans, or virus infection. Yes, in the past we
looked
> >at disk fragmentation and such, but today it's all about a corrupted or
> >commandeered operating system.
> >
> >I would suggest that you do the following, in order:
> >
> > a) Visit http://www.lavasoftusa.com and download and install the free
> >version of AdAware. Don't bother running it just yet - just install it.
> >
> > b) Visit http://www.safer-networking.org and grab Spybot Search &
Destroy.
> >Do the same as above.
> >
> > c) Make certain your anti-virus defintions are up to date.
> >
> >Now, restart your computer in "Safe Mode". Run a full virus scan using
your
> >anti-virus, followed by AdAware, followed by Spybot. Reboot the computer
> >normally and run both AdAware and Spybot a second time. Reboot once
more.
> >
> >Is it back to normal speed now?
> >
> >
> > Carmine Castiglia
> > Get your stuff back for less with StuffBak Labels & Tags
> >http://www.infosystemspro.com/ilike_004.htm
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 2:42:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Tony,

The system restore feature is one of the important new features in XP. Windows
ME has one, too, but with ME being as flaky as it is, I would not trust it.

"Sometimes, the easiest thing is just to re-install OS." Well, yes and no. And
reinstall all software applications. Followed by many megabytes of Windows
critical fixes and security patches. Or is it security fixes and critical
patches? Whatever. More than one reboot required after installing them. Oh,
yeah. Back up all your data before doing a reinstall. Easy to re-install. I
can only encourage people to re-install after strongly suggesting that they make
a detailed written reinstallation plan, showing all the steps needed to get it
done.

Of course, major corporations have standardized hardware and software
configurations and automated backups onto servers, which makes it real easy to
do a reinstall. But for those of us outside major corporate America, a
re-install can be a major chore... Ben Myers

On Mon, 9 Aug 2004 21:41:21 +0000 (UTC), "Tony" <poipoipoi@poipoipoi.com> wrote:

>Sometimes, the easiest thing is just to re-install OS.
>
>However, I just solved the problems with my matching by going to System
>Restore, and setting the machine to two months ago, easily done in XP,
>forget how its done in previous systems.
>
>
>
>
>
>
><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>news:4117e88b.31564187@news.charter.net...
>> If all these tips do not result in the computer running at somewhere near
>its
>> original speed, do the disk cleanup (as suggested by someone else), then
>look at
>> the rest of the sludge in the temporary files folder, delete the useless
>stuff,
>> THEN defrag the hard drive. Note that disk cleanup does an incomplete
>job.
>> Click Start, then Run, then enter %temp% in the run dialog box and click
>OK.
>> The resulting view of the temporary file folder for the currently logged
>in user
>> shows what is left AFTER the disk cleanup. In many cases, the leftovers
>are
>> substantial and may include web pages, GIF and JPEG images, HP inkjet
>printer
>> spooling files, and a lot of trash left behind by applications written and
>> tested by naive and inexperienced software development groups who fancy
>> themselves to be software engineers.
>>
>> Also, each and every program loaded when the system starts up takes up
>memory,
>> and makes it harder for other programs to run. Each and every icon on the
>> desktop and in the Start->Programs menu tree also takes up more memory.
>Make
>> sure you know what each of these programs does, and remove any which you
>do not
>> use. Almost every software package installed these days thinks it is SO
>> important that it must be launched when your system starts up. Run
>MSCONFIG to
>> see them all... Ben Myers
>>
>> On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 20:53:35 GMT, "Carmine Castiglia"
>> <ccastiglia@infosystemspro.com> wrote:
>>
>> >"fabiogr" <fabiogr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> >news:3b3634ab.0408091203.1c5174b6@posting.google.com...
>> >> Hello,
>> >>
>> >> My Dell Dimension 4400 with WinXP is going really slow, usually taking
>> >> more than a few seconds to open web pages, start new applications,
>> >> freezing when switching desktops.
>> >>
>> >> All this began to happen after I started storing digital pictures in
>> >> the HD (about 1Gig now). Browsing this newgroup a few things came to
>> >> mind
>> >>
>> >> - Fan clogged with dust (computer is under the table)
>> >> - Bad HD - any ideas how to check the HD ?
>> >> - Computer warmimg up
>> >>
>> >> So I tought of backing up everything and reformat/reinstall all the
>> >> stuff again.
>> >>
>> >> Anyone with a similar experience?
>> >>
>> >> Thanks
>> >>
>> >> Fabio
>> >
>> >Absolutely the first thing to consider when a computer begins running
>"slow"
>> >is spyware, adware, trojans, or virus infection. Yes, in the past we
>looked
>> >at disk fragmentation and such, but today it's all about a corrupted or
>> >commandeered operating system.
>> >
>> >I would suggest that you do the following, in order:
>> >
>> > a) Visit http://www.lavasoftusa.com and download and install the free
>> >version of AdAware. Don't bother running it just yet - just install it.
>> >
>> > b) Visit http://www.safer-networking.org and grab Spybot Search &
>Destroy.
>> >Do the same as above.
>> >
>> > c) Make certain your anti-virus defintions are up to date.
>> >
>> >Now, restart your computer in "Safe Mode". Run a full virus scan using
>your
>> >anti-virus, followed by AdAware, followed by Spybot. Reboot the computer
>> >normally and run both AdAware and Spybot a second time. Reboot once
>more.
>> >
>> >Is it back to normal speed now?
>> >
>> >
>> > Carmine Castiglia
>> > Get your stuff back for less with StuffBak Labels & Tags
>> >http://www.infosystemspro.com/ilike_004.htm
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>
>
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 11:18:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Hello,

>Absolutely the first thing to consider when a computer begins running "slow"
> is spyware, adware, trojans, or virus infection. Yes, in the past we looked
> at disk fragmentation and such, but today it's all about a corrupted or
> commandeered operating system.
>
> I would suggest that you do the following, in order:
>
> a) Visit http://www.lavasoftusa.com and download and install the free
> version of AdAware. Don't bother running it just yet - just install it.
>
> b) Visit http://www.safer-networking.org and grab Spybot Search & Destroy.
> Do the same as above.
>

Thanks very much to you and all others for the invaluable help.
After running both Adware and Spybot the computer is now back in shape.
(I had about 800 hits on Adware).

Is adware the virus of the 21st century?

Fabio
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 5:40:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4117e88b.31564187@news.charter.net...
> If all these tips do not result in the computer running at somewhere near
its
> original speed, do the disk cleanup (as suggested by someone else), then
look at
> the rest of the sludge in the temporary files folder, delete the useless
stuff,
> THEN defrag the hard drive...


Despite the need for magazine editors to continue to bow ever so slightly to
their advertisers and therefore continue to push things like defragging
utilities, anyone who has been around small computer systems for more than
10 years knows that defragging is simply not the necessity that it once was.

There was a time when defragging a "large" disk (back when 40 *megabytes*
was a "large" disk!) could easily speed up a system's overall performance by
15% or more. There were a number of reasons for the improved speed but the
single most important one was that hard disk seek times were so darned slow
relative to today's drives. With disk seek times now down to 1/20th or less
of what they were a number of years ago, plus on-board disk controllers
(used to be on a separate card, now part of the disk drive itself), plus
on-board data caching - not to mention disk rotational speeds of 7,200 rpm
vs 3,600 rpm years ago - the performance gains provided by defragging a
modern system are probably no more than a couple of percentage points.

On the other hand, the single most important cause of PC's "slowing down"
based on my experience working with dozens of PC's at the office as well as
the inevitable requests of friends and coworkers for help with their
personal systems is as I said earlier, trojans, viruses, spyware, and
adware. When someone brings their "slow" PC to me to "look at", I typically
find two or three separate virus infections, and - in one case - six
different hidden adware applications running in the background.

Carmine Castiglia
Bugs in your software? How about mice in your hardware?
http://www.infosystemspro.com/tip_002.htm
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 5:40:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Carmine Castiglia" <ccastiglia@infosystemspro.com> wrote in message
news:af4Sc.1130$ZC7.536@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...

<snip>

> On the other hand, the single most important cause of PC's "slowing down"
> based on my experience working with dozens of PC's at the office as well
> as
> the inevitable requests of friends and coworkers for help with their
> personal systems is as I said earlier, trojans, viruses, spyware, and
> adware. When someone brings their "slow" PC to me to "look at", I
> typically
> find two or three separate virus infections, and - in one case - six
> different hidden adware applications running in the background.
>

<snip>


Such is the reason one wishes to break the fingers of whomever the "click
happy" individual causing such repeated slowdowns, infections, and other
quagmires.

:) 

Stew