Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

possible AMD CPU overheating

Tags:
  • CPUs
Last response: in CPUs
Share
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2001 10:31:28 PM

How can i tell my CPU has (or contiuously) has overheated?
My system, i've had for about 6 months and now recently it shuts down (screen goes blank) and stays down for days (i have to keep it turned off because it only detects processor/memory and hangs immediately after that).. then after being off for a day or two i turn it on and it runs perfect. I check my cpu temperature (when my system is working) and usually its about 43 Celcius while idle. I imagine when i use the internet/games ..etc. the temperature must rise. Also today i looked under the heat sink and there is no cooling grease.. only the little pad under the heat sink and even that apparently has melted through.

Is this what normally happens when a cpu over heats? btw.. my system is not overclocked
Is there a chance my processor could already be damaged since this has happened a few times?... or could this be some other hardware problem..

my system

900 MHz Athron
Epox 8k7a socket A motherboard.
256 MB pc 133 memory
20 gig harddrive
8 x 4 x 32 cdrw.
16 x dvd drive
SB Live
normal 56 k modem..

any help/suggestions/comments greatly appreciated...

More about : amd cpu overheating

Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2001 11:16:54 PM

Hmm, the melting makes me think heat problems, but suggestion wise...If the processor is retail...send it back to AMD and get a new one..free.

=Quantum
AO Admin
The Dr.Twister Network
http://ao.drtwister.com
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 26, 2001 5:18:47 AM

I doubt it, I run between 45-55 idle and not a problem.

It could be a dodgey thermal pad has melted and then damaged the CPU but thats just guessing but no your CPU is not hot.

If you want to test for hardware remove everything but your processor, ram, video card and HDD. If that works add one part at a time till one makes the system not work.

<b><font color=red>Facts speek for themselfs</b></font color=red>
Related resources
February 26, 2001 5:20:42 PM

<b>i have to keep it turned off because it only detects processor/memory and hangs immediately after that</b>
Personally, I don't think it's heat problem. My TB700@850 on A7V runs at ~43 to 49C without any problem.
Have you tried another stick of RAM. Another possibility is you might have a defective Hard disk.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 26, 2001 5:25:21 PM

Papo,
Just a thought....Have you checked your power supply? How big is it?
Mike
February 26, 2001 5:53:31 PM

Remember the Athon has no way of telling itself "whoa, It's getting too hot for me!" It has no thermo protection, none!
sorta like if a human being was missing sweat glands,
overheating=death or slow death for a athlon.

you have to employ heroic measures to keep your athlon cool.

If you remove the pad, and replace it with a better thermo compound; your athlon will live much longer.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 26, 2001 10:05:05 PM

Thanks..
I never thought of the faulty hard drive.. im going to try another hard drive i have on another computer to see if it could be that...

Also.. where could i buy thermal compound?? i guess just in case it would be the hard drive im still paranoid about overheating...

thanks. ..keep em coming.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 27, 2001 3:03:35 PM

My systems run at 46 C under load. Frankly that's hgher than I expected, but well within what the CPU ought to be able to take. (As I read the numbers on the chip, mine should function up to 90 C, not that I'm going to let it get that high.)

The "pad" under the heat sink is supposed to melt. What you want is a microscopic layer between the CPU and the heat sink. One of my coolers came with the strip of paper over the pad missing. Because of that, I scraped the whole thing off and replaced it with thermal silicone. That is also what you are supposed to do if you remove the cooler.

If you touch the pad, you are interfering with the heat transfer ability. Skin cells and oil aren't as efficient at heat transfer.

Conductive silicone is available for $0.99 at Radio Schlock. You also ought to make sure your cooler is well seated against the chip. If it's cocked up on one side because it's contacting the chip socket or something, heat transfer will not be as effective. Most guides recommend installing the CPU and cooler onto the motherboard before installing the motherboard into the case. This let's you eyeball it well.

Finally, check you fan against the comparison done. I chose the second best one off the table, the GlobalWin FOP 32-I. See http://www6.tomshardware.com/cpu/00q4/001211/ If anyone has any ideas why I'm getting 46 C when the table shows 38 C is expected, I'd be interested in hearing about it.

Last word of advice - don't pay much attention to people talking about "heroic" measures being needed to cool AMD CPUs, or whining about how things can't be done. A person who says it can't be done should never be allowed to get in the way of someone doing it. They have an axe to grind or they just aren't particularly careful about how they do things.

Regards,
Thomas

There's no justice, there's just us.
a b à CPUs
February 27, 2001 11:32:10 PM

your higher temp may be from not enough case cooling, fresh air flowing through the case. the revievs were done on a workbench not in a case. a simple test would be to to take your case cover off and see if your temps drop. if they do then you need better case cooling. better fans or more fans.also look at your motherboard temp it should be close to room temperature ,at least within 1 to 2 deg celsius if you are trying to overclock
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2001 1:31:27 AM

I have two extra fans, but your point is well taken. No matter how many extra fans I install, it's easy to believe that a chip inside a case runs hotter than one in the open.

Motherboard temp has been indicating low 30s. That's warmer than room temp, but I don't see how it's a problem.

Regards,
Thomas

There's no justice, there's just us.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2001 2:37:57 PM

Well... i think i bit the big one..
1) i forgot and i turned on my computer w/o the heatsink...guess that finished frying of my processor (based on some of the things i've read).
2) i noticed that my processor (athlon socket a) has one of the corners on the little amd plate chipped..... no clue how it got there but its explaining a lot of things now...

Im guessing the problem was with the processor all along since on occasions my computer would run well for a while but would eventually go blank usually when the processor was under load (downloads and games)...
Im going to have to buy a whole new processor i guess...
anyone know a good site where i could get athlons for a good price? I know on the "Build your own computer" guide tom had he got an athlon socket a processor (800 i believe) for about a hundred bucks.. im looking for at least a 900 (heck since im at it might as well go for something bigger)...

any further help..again.. would be greatly appreciated.
February 28, 2001 3:02:24 PM

you should send it back to Amd and demand your money back!
because of the lack of thermo protection you are going to end up buying two cpu's and I think Amd should pay for the 2nd one.
!