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OEM vs. ??? - Stop fighting w/ Fugger and help ME!

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March 6, 2001 5:25:45 PM

I read in the forum that OEM chips (both CPU and RAM I assume) are to be avoided. Scanning through Pricewatch what should I look for?

E.g. The first entry for a TBird 800Mhz was $99:
"AUTHORIZED AMD RESELLER" - no mention of OEM. How do I know a chip (again, RAM or CPU) is better than OEM?


"Just the fax maam, just the fax" - Bruce Willis, Die Hard II<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Cronie on 03/06/01 04:19 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
March 6, 2001 7:42:50 PM

Go to the site that is offering the product and verify that it is coming in the retail box and not the 'white box'. (White box = OEM)

If they don't say if it's the retail version or the OEM version then email their sales department and ask.

If the sales department can't answer your question, don't buy from them. Heh heh.

- Sanity is purely based on point-of-view.
March 6, 2001 7:55:28 PM

Always make sure procduct is in stock. sales people love to take orders for parts not in stock and leave you waiting for weeks till you call them back and ask where is my part.

Also check www.resellerratngs.com to make sure the vendor your dealing with is a good one.

Best parts go to "retail stock" everything else goes into OEM stock. one real problem to watch out for is buying a OEM CPU that has been returned and put back on shelf for resale.

AMD being of crappy deisgn and lacking thermal protection get sent back quite often, sometimes beig returned to shelf for resale after being overclocked and fried, mishandled and subjected to ESD.

Retail is best choice.
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March 6, 2001 7:55:39 PM

from what I gather, neither Intel nor Amd test their OEM chips look for a post by stable...for the lowdown.

IMO, I would get retail, but when I build for someone else I go OEM.

Also If not mistaken, all the listing are from Authorized Amd Dealers or VARs.

hopes this helps!


"Amd cpu...Gone in 2 secs flat, it truly is a fast chip!"
March 6, 2001 8:21:27 PM

Fabricated Fugger Fact!

"AMD being of crappy deisgn and lacking thermal protection get sent back quite often, sometimes beig returned to shelf for resale after being overclocked and fried, mishandled and subjected to ESD."

Another Fabricated Fugger Fact (FFF for short) by Fugger! Resale of dead chips. What will he fabricate next?
March 6, 2001 8:33:02 PM

FFFFFF - F*cking Foolish Fabricated Fugger Faggot Fact. There are so many possibilities.
March 6, 2001 8:33:36 PM

Let's not go there. Whether or not that really happens is unimportant - what is important to me is understanding how to avoid OEMs.

From what I have read, most folks in this forum know their crap and can discern for themselves whether Fugger's facts are fabricated or not. Right or wrong Fugger and his posts are going to be around for a long time. Methinks he really enjoys getting a rise out of the rest of you, and THAT'S what leads to some of the absurd discussion threads.
Anonymous
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March 6, 2001 10:23:07 PM

People responding to your question seem to think that OEM parts are of lower quality, but I am skeptical that there is any ACTUAL EVIDENCE is this.

I can tell you that I have bought ONLY 'white box' or OEM components for each of six computers that I built this year (so far). All have met or exceded my expectations.

CPUs (all PIII OEM flip chips) are all running at an average of 25% faster than rated speed. NONE have failed. The only exceptions to the OEM purchases are monitors and motherboards, as I recall. I like the savings.

For what it's worth.

BTW.. I always was told by industry guys that OEM is what the builders buy (and resell).. including Gateway.. Dell..

Isn't that true. And, aren't they the same stock items that they use ??

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by clonan on 03/06/01 07:30 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
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March 6, 2001 10:33:06 PM

do a search for STABLE a very intelligent poster of facts,he already answered the same question for someone else about oem and retail cpus
March 6, 2001 10:34:05 PM

I've only bought OEM and had no problems. That's for both intel and amd. However, with the rapid change in processors lately, I'm not sure what I think anymore. If Stable is to be taken seriously (and I do), then getting an OEM might not be to your advantage. However, if you buy a OEM fsb 200, then you might actually be getting a fsb 266 reject, and that's not too bad if you can get it to overclock. But there is no guarantee. My biggest problem is what Stable says about getting a different core (aluminum vs copper) depending on if it's retail or OEM. Not sure what I think yet, but I'll have to decide soon as well.

I upgrade so often that it doesn't make a difference to me. If it lasts 30 days it will last for the 3 years. Do note thought that a retail box includes a heatsink along with the warrenty.

On pricewatch, most if not all, say OEM or RETAIL. Put that in your search parameters. The best thing to do is to get to the page from the main links, and then copy the search parameters that it gives you and add RETAIL, if you want to find those. Generally you pay $50 more for retail, which could lead to a 60% increase in the price if you don't buy the fastest processor. For example, the last time I checked the Duron 800 had a 60% difference in price.

Also watch out for shipping.

"I think I brained my damage"
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March 6, 2001 10:50:52 PM

Yes, just use the search box. Remember that adds are sometimes worded differently from each other, such as a Thunderbird being called a Thunderbird, T-bird, 1.2GHz, 1200MHz, etc., but the search will also pick up word fragments-for an AMD Thunderbird, you can just enter "AMD and bird and retail" to pick up all the variations.

Suicide is painless...........
March 6, 2001 10:54:58 PM

If you plan to go the AMD route and you don't plan to overclock, a retail CPU comes with a heatsink and fan. You also get a warranty. (Sorry, I forget how long it lasts).

If you plan to overclock then you might as well save some money and buy the OEM CPU because you will have to replace the stock heatsink and fan for a better aftermarket pair. Also, overclocking voids your warranty on the retail CPU.
Anonymous
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March 7, 2001 1:42:42 AM

So, how would AMD or Intel know that you overclocked the chip, anyway. Of course, they would know if you told them. But you wouldn't get a replacement chip if you admitted that.

All of these saints posting on this site, of course.. would never mislead AMD.. or Intel. They are WAY too loyal.
Anonymous
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March 7, 2001 3:00:53 AM

Yo fugger [-peep-] them haters man. I got your back. AMD can lick the bottom of my ball sack and all you who think you're "soooo special" for supporting AMD. In 3 you won't even see AMD, well maybe making [-peep-] for Radio Shack or something, but that's besides the point. So keep on speaking the truth brother fugger. peace out
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