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idea: pirate roguelike

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Anonymous
May 21, 2005 7:15:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

There was a thread awhile back about possible different types of
roguelikes, and the oddity that most (popular?) roguelikes are
midievally based. This got me thinking. I should make a pirate
roguelike. (Not that I'm going to start a second one before I even get
my first off of the ground, but that doesn't stop me from thinking.)

You start off as a captain of a ship. Or maybe the game has a first half
where the goal is to become the captain of a ship. You start in the
initial town, and can take ships or means of land travel to destination
(dungeons) to find and complete quests. Quests which help you to gain
the money to buy (or means to steal or otherwise acquire) your first
ship and the notoriety (or money) to gain an initial crew (or perhaps
even acquiring some special artifact.)

The game can then takes to the high seas. Your character, the captain
(even in the first half) will have a skills tree that is exercised
through action. And so would your crew, who gain skills by taking
certain actions (pistol dueling, swordplay, using the cannons, as a
leader, strategy, tactics... et cetera.) But your crew would die off and
you'd have to gain new ones by hiring them or going to a bar in a far
away town and getting someone too drunk and let them wake up half a day
out at sea. You would lead them in battle and on land.

The game might even be more like a strategy game, since you have to
weigh your provisions and the skills of your men, decide who to fight
and evade, and outfit your ship(s).

In fact, this doesn't sound like a roguelike at all... it sounds like a
viable commercial game. I should get started on it. Once I finish my
roguelike.

--
Jim Strathmeyer

More about : idea pirate roguelike

Anonymous
May 21, 2005 7:15:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

On Sat, 21 May 2005 15:15:52 -0500,
strathWHATEVERIGETENOUGHSPAMANYWAYS@ipass.net (Jim Strathmeyer) wrote:

>There was a thread awhile back about possible different types of
>roguelikes, and the oddity that most (popular?) roguelikes are
>midievally based. This got me thinking. I should make a pirate
>roguelike. (Not that I'm going to start a second one before I even get
>my first off of the ground, but that doesn't stop me from thinking.)

How about a stone age R/L? The cavern is both the city and the dungeon.
The most advanced weapons are the club and the flint knife. Instead of
goblins and dragons, you face sabertooth cats and cave bears.

Or, a sort of reverse R/L, where you play a monster or a pack of
monsters. Think Dungeon Keeper, but without the whole "build your
dungeon" aspect. Or what the heck, that too.

Maybe a cult leader R/L, where you face opponents ranging from the
average person, who may or may not follow you, all the way up to the
local major religion's head priest/priestess/prophet/messiah/whatever.

A psychic R/L, where you use powers of the mind. Explore whatever you're
exploring - not physically, but via astral projection, or dream travel,
or something. Would make exiting the dungeon tons easier:
> Exit
You exit the dungeon, returning to your physical body.

A god-level R/L, where you are a deity, with appropriate goals and
opponents. Instead of gathering money, you gather worshippers, or souls.
Not too sure how you'd do this, actually - it works for an RPG but maybe
not so much for a R/L.
--
auric underscore underscore at hotmail dot com
*****
You feel a whole lot more like you do now than you did when you used to.
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 10:33:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Jim Strathmeyer wrote:

> You start off as a captain of a ship. Or maybe the game has a first half
> where the goal is to become the captain of a ship. You start in the
> initial town, and can take ships or means of land travel to destination
> (dungeons) to find and complete quests. Quests which help you to gain
> the money to buy (or means to steal or otherwise acquire) your first
> ship and the notoriety (or money) to gain an initial crew (or perhaps
> even acquiring some special artifact.)
>
> The game can then takes to the high seas. Your character, the captain
> (even in the first half) will have a skills tree that is exercised
> through action. And so would your crew, who gain skills by taking
> certain actions (pistol dueling, swordplay, using the cannons, as a
> leader, strategy, tactics... et cetera.) But your crew would die off and
> you'd have to gain new ones by hiring them or going to a bar in a far
> away town and getting someone too drunk and let them wake up half a day
> out at sea. You would lead them in battle and on land.

Another part of progressing would be obtaining bigger and better ships.
You'd start out with a small single-masted coast hugger with just a
couple of cannons and a handful of crew.

To get better ships, you could disable enemy ships without sinking them,
then board them and take over - difficult to do, but the result should
be a ship that's more valuable than what you could buy.

Obviously you'd need to have access to a shipyard that didn't ask too
many awkward questions - like "This ship has been through hell. And the
name's been painted over and changed. Hey, weren't you here last week in
a different ship?"

Making the contacts needed to gain access to a pirate friendly shipyard
might be part of the game too. The legitimate shipyards wouldn't sell
you military ship types, but you wouldn't be able to take one over until
you could take it to a bootleg shipyard and have the inevitable battle
damage repaired.

> In fact, this doesn't sound like a roguelike at all... it sounds like a
> viable commercial game.

Viable? You could say that... The original Sid Meier's Pirates! was one
of the biggest hits of all time. Educational too - Playing it taught me
that floppy disks can wear out. ;-)

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 10:33:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Sherm Pendley <spamtrap@dot-app.org> wrote:
> Another part of progressing would be obtaining bigger and better
> ships. You'd start out with a small single-masted coast hugger with
> just a couple of cannons and a handful of crew.

Of course. There's no reason that you couldn't captian a fleet of ships.
It would be interesting how the micro and macro management would work
out. I imagine implementing skills for every character, so in order to
get an 'attack rating' for a ship, you add together the skill of
everyone on that ship with the quality of the ship/weapons.

> Obviously you'd need to have access to a shipyard that didn't ask too
> many awkward questions - like "This ship has been through hell. And
> the name's been painted over and changed. Hey, weren't you here last
> week in a different ship?"

You'd be able to play a good or evil character, each of whom chases
after/is chased by the opposite.

--
Jim Strathmeyer
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 1:21:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Jim Strathmeyer wrote:

> Of course. There's no reason that you couldn't captian a fleet of ships.

That would give you something to do with the older ships when you
capture a better one. You could make it your flagship, and promote a
crewmember to be captain of the previous one.

> It would be interesting how the micro and macro management would work
> out. I imagine implementing skills for every character, so in order to
> get an 'attack rating' for a ship, you add together the skill of
> everyone on that ship with the quality of the ship/weapons.

I'd think the micro/macro management would work pretty much like in real
life. That is, you could macro manage your fleet as a whole, and give
broad general orders to your captains. But when it comes to tactical
level decisions, you'd really only be able to manage your flagship at
that level.

Crew people could have a set of personality traits - intelligence,
aggresiveness, greed, loyalty, etc. - that would help determine the way
they interpreted your orders.

> You'd be able to play a good or evil character, each of whom chases
> after/is chased by the opposite.

I don't think it should be quite so clear-cut. Politics could be a big
part of the game. You could accept different levels of support from
different countries, with your reputation in each helping determine the
welcome (or lack of one) you receive in a given port.

You could even have multiple loyalties, playing the conflicting sides
against one another to your own advantage.

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 1:59:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

On 2005-05-21 22:15:52, strathWHATEVERIGETENOUGHSPAMANYWAYS@ipass.net (Jim
Strathmeyer) wrote:

> There was a thread awhile back about possible different types of
> roguelikes, and the oddity that most (popular?) roguelikes are
> midievally based. This got me thinking. I should make a pirate
> roguelike. (Not that I'm going to start a second one before I even get
> my first off of the ground, but that doesn't stop me from thinking.)
>
> You start off as a captain of a ship. Or maybe the game has a first half
> where the goal is to become the captain of a ship. You start in the
> initial town, and can take ships or means of land travel to destination
> (dungeons) to find and complete quests. Quests which help you to gain
> the money to buy (or means to steal or otherwise acquire) your first
> ship and the notoriety (or money) to gain an initial crew (or perhaps
> even acquiring some special artifact.)

I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ... FreePascal ;) 
It's called Sp4ce P1rates ! And is more based in the Duck Dodgers universe,
you'de be either a human, martian or Duck. You start out on the docks,
most likely doing the first missions by yourself ( stealing stuff from docked
ships for a price ), once you start hiring people ( or people will come to you
if you can manage a big theft ) the real game starts. Dont have an idea yet
on the real game since for now I am still thinking over a docks generator ;) 
But I admit that thinking about a pirate game is kind of fun. Sites like the
pirate speak generator are priceless ;) 

printText( 1 , 1 , 'Ye help be non existant' );
printText( 1 , 3 , 'What be you waitin'' for lad ? Press a key !' );

is just fun ( although I wished the help did exist ).

Anyway, if anybody is a big Dodgers fan, and knows about well hidden resources
on the web, spit it out !

<SNIP blue sky thinking>

> In fact, this doesn't sound like a roguelike at all... it sounds like a
> viable commercial game. I should get started on it. Once I finish my
> roguelike.

Umm. Yes.

>
> --
> Jim Strathmeyer
>
>

Cheers,
T.
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 2:35:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

In article <YtKdnULCz8plCxLfRVn-qA@adelphia.com>, strathWHATEVERIGETENOUGHSPAMANYWAYS@ipass.net (Jim Strathmeyer) wrote:
>There was a thread awhile back about possible different types of
>roguelikes, and the oddity that most (popular?) roguelikes are
>midievally based. This got me thinking. I should make a pirate
>roguelike. (Not that I'm going to start a second one before I even get
>my first off of the ground, but that doesn't stop me from thinking.)

Not exactly a roguelike, but I assume you've seen:
http://www.firaxis.com/games/game_detail.php?gameid=2

Alan
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 8:49:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

"Jim Strathmeyer" <strathWHATEVERIGETENOUGHSPAMANYWAYS@ipass.net> wrote in
message news:YtKdnULCz8plCxLfRVn-qA@adelphia.com...
[snip it like it's hot]

> In fact, this doesn't sound like a roguelike at all... it sounds like a
> viable commercial game. I should get started on it. Once I finish my
> roguelike.


Well, this has been done, although it has fallen short. The best incarnation
of the game you describe is Seadogs. Play it, enjoy it, it's good. The
would-be Seadogs II was mangled into Pirates of the Caribbean, an awful and
barely playable game with--can you guess it-- awful console controls.

Other than this one there were some more trade-oriented games, such as Port
Royale (which was fairly fun for a while), in which you also get to have fun
sea battles and plunder booty but from a isometric view with 3D models (I
have to say this worked very well). They prettified the interface, graphics,
and trading for Port Royale II, but totally killified the high-seas combat
(you could only control 1 ship per battle, for example--very lame).

The recent Sid Meier's Pirates! remake also was of this incarnation. The
game had some fun parts, but you had to divide your fleet and your money
into your crew very often, effectively losing all but one ship, almost all
your crew, and almost all your money. It was therefore extremely easy to
take control of dozens of ships in minutes, but the game mechanics forced
you to give them up. IMHO this was just bad design-- if it was in the
original I truly don't think it excuses it-- when something's not fun it's
just not fun (and old games, although they may hold a place in our hearts,
sometimes have very poor design).

If you seriously intend to take on a project of this magnitude, I'd say the
most well-received game you'd have to contend with is Seadogs.

Oh and...

Any game can be made into a Roguelike.

You can quote me on that ;) 

--Nolithius
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 11:22:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Auric__ napisał(a):
[...]
> How about a stone age R/L? The cavern is both the city and the dungeon.
> The most advanced weapons are the club and the flint knife. Instead of
> goblins and dragons, you face sabertooth cats and cave bears.

I plan to make Jungle Adventure, so creatures like these are my
favourite ("Dire sabretooth tiger jumps and bites you in the neck. You
can't breath. You are bleeding. You panic. You die.")

[...]


--
Milesss
m i l e s s s @ i n t e r i a . p l
www.milesss.mylog.pl
"/0"
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 2:39:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Nolithius wrote:
> "Jim Strathmeyer" <strathWHATEVERIGETENOUGHSPAMANYWAYS@ipass.net> wrote in
> message news:YtKdnULCz8plCxLfRVn-qA@adelphia.com...
> [snip it like it's hot]
[snip it; it's a bot]

Why did you edit the Subject: line to remove "idea: "?

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 5:16:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

konijn_ wrote:
> I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ... FreePascal ;) 

Aaah! Another one to join the Dark Side!
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"It's much easier to make an army of dumb good people than to
make one single smart good guy..." -- DarkGod
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 5:16:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Kornel Kisielewicz wrote:
> konijn_ wrote:
>
>> I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ...
>> FreePascal ;) 
>
> Aaah! Another one to join the Dark Side!

The shroud of the Dark Side has fallen. Begun the language war has...

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 7:55:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Twisted One wrote:
> Kornel Kisielewicz wrote:
>> konijn_ wrote:
>>> I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ...
>>> FreePascal ;) 
>>
>> Aaah! Another one to join the Dark Side!
>
> The shroud of the Dark Side has fallen. Begun the language war has...

Do not underestimate the power of FreePascal! ;-D
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"Gott weiss, Ich will kein Engel sein..." -- Rammstein /Engel/
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 8:05:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Twisted One wrote:
> Nolithius wrote:
>
>> "Jim Strathmeyer" <strathWHATEVERIGETENOUGHSPAMANYWAYS@ipass.net>
>> wrote in
>> message news:YtKdnULCz8plCxLfRVn-qA@adelphia.com...
>> [snip it like it's hot]
>
> [snip it; it's a bot]
>
> Why did you edit the Subject: line to remove "idea: "?

Maybe it's another evil of Google Groups?
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"Oh come on. We both know the truth about this game --
vapourware." -- Anathiel about GenRogue
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 1:23:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

On Mon, 23 May 2005 16:05:50 +0200, Kornel Kisielewicz
<kisielewicz@gazeta.pl> wrote:

>Twisted One wrote:
>> Nolithius wrote:
>>
>>> "Jim Strathmeyer" <strathWHATEVERIGETENOUGHSPAMANYWAYS@ipass.net>
>>> wrote in
>>> message news:YtKdnULCz8plCxLfRVn-qA@adelphia.com...
>>> [snip it like it's hot]
>>
>> [snip it; it's a bot]
>>
>> Why did you edit the Subject: line to remove "idea: "?
>
>Maybe it's another evil of Google Groups?

Outlook Express.
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 1:24:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

> I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ... FreePascal ;) 


Has anybody tried version 2 yet? I'm still using 1.3 - is it worth the 22mb?
download?
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 1:24:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:
>>I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ... FreePascal ;) 
>
>
>
> Has anybody tried version 2 yet? I'm still using 1.3 - is it worth the 22mb?
> download?

1.3? Never heard of 1.3... you mean 1.0.3? If so, it is ABSOLUTELY worth
it. The 1.9.x branch was already more stable, a lot more powerful, and a
lot more optimized then any version in the 1.0.X branch...
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"Gott weiss, Ich will kein Engel sein..." -- Rammstein /Engel/
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 1:24:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:
>>I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ... FreePascal ;) 
>
> Has anybody tried version 2 yet? I'm still using 1.3 - is it worth the 22mb?
> download?

No -- but easier, more seductive it is. Once you start down the dark
path, forever will it dominate your destiny.

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 10:17:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

"Kornel Kisielewicz" wrote in message
> Lochok wrote:
>>>I have started actually a roguelike ( again ) written in ... FreePascal
>>>;)
>>
>>
>>
>> Has anybody tried version 2 yet? I'm still using 1.3 - is it worth the
>> 22mb? download?
>
> 1.3? Never heard of 1.3... you mean 1.0.3? If so, it is ABSOLUTELY worth
> it. The 1.9.x branch was already more stable, a lot more powerful, and a
> lot more optimized then any version in the 1.0.X branch...

Well the one thing I've found FP lacking in is Database support. Is there
any sane way of doing it in 2?
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 10:17:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:
> Well the one thing I've found FP lacking in is Database support. Is there
> any sane way of doing it in 2?

I didn't work with databases in FPC, but AFAIR there were some
improvements in that field in the 1.9 branch. Chceck out FCL and Lazarus.
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"From what I've read, a lot of people believe that GenRogue
exists and will be released some day" -- Arxenia Xentrophore
Anonymous
May 25, 2005 11:21:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Milesss wrote:
> Auric__ napisal(a):
>("Dire sabretooth tiger jumps and bites you in the neck. You
> can't breath. You are bleeding. You panic. You die.")

already an instadeath? Doesn't sound like a great start.
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 7:55:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:
> Well the one thing I've found FP lacking in is Database support. Is there
> any sane way of doing it in 2?

Of course not. If Mistress Compiler catches you with a "little black
book" and suspects you've been seeing other women ... well, let's just
say I hope you don't live anwhere close to or upwind of me. I'd rather
not be in the primary fallout zone if and when that happens, thank you
very much. It's certainly ludicrous to think she would actually provide
assistance in accessing a little black book!

But if you are a bit indirect about it, you might be able to pull the
wool over her eyes. (Hint: try calling C code. There must be good C
database-access libraries.)

;) 

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 8:08:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Twisted One wrote:
> Of course not. If Mistress Compiler catches you with a "little black
> book" and suspects you've been seeing other women ... well, let's just
> say I hope you don't live anwhere close to or upwind of me. I'd rather
> not be in the primary fallout zone if and when that happens, thank you
> very much. It's certainly ludicrous to think she would actually provide
> assistance in accessing a little black book!
>
> But if you are a bit indirect about it, you might be able to pull the
> wool over her eyes. (Hint: try calling C code. There must be good C
> database-access libraries.)

P.S.: BE SURE there is no lingering scent of perfume when your C calls
return -- or there WILL be trouble!

> ;) 

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 3:08:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Auric__ wrote:
>
> How about a stone age R/L? The cavern is both the city and the dungeon.
> The most advanced weapons are the club and the flint knife. Instead of
> goblins and dragons, you face sabertooth cats and cave bears.
>
> Or, a sort of reverse R/L, where you play a monster or a pack of
> monsters. Think Dungeon Keeper, but without the whole "build your
> dungeon" aspect. Or what the heck, that too.
>
> Maybe a cult leader R/L, where you face opponents ranging from the
> average person, who may or may not follow you, all the way up to the
> local major religion's head priest/priestess/prophet/messiah/whatever.
>
> A psychic R/L, where you use powers of the mind. Explore whatever you're
> exploring - not physically, but via astral projection, or dream travel,
> or something. Would make exiting the dungeon tons easier:
>
>>Exit
>
> You exit the dungeon, returning to your physical body.
>
> A god-level R/L, where you are a deity, with appropriate goals and
> opponents. Instead of gathering money, you gather worshippers, or souls.
> Not too sure how you'd do this, actually - it works for an RPG but maybe
> not so much for a R/L.

*or* you make a R/L that can give you all these and any of these ideas.. :) 


vooood
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 3:08:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

On Fri, 27 May 2005 23:08:05 +0200, vooood <vooood@IHATESPAMgmail.com>
wrote:

>Auric__ wrote:
>>
>> How about a stone age R/L? The cavern is both the city and the dungeon.
>> The most advanced weapons are the club and the flint knife. Instead of
>> goblins and dragons, you face sabertooth cats and cave bears.
>>
>> Or, a sort of reverse R/L, where you play a monster or a pack of
>> monsters. Think Dungeon Keeper, but without the whole "build your
>> dungeon" aspect. Or what the heck, that too.
>>
>> Maybe a cult leader R/L, where you face opponents ranging from the
>> average person, who may or may not follow you, all the way up to the
>> local major religion's head priest/priestess/prophet/messiah/whatever.
>>
>> A psychic R/L, where you use powers of the mind. Explore whatever you're
>> exploring - not physically, but via astral projection, or dream travel,
>> or something. Would make exiting the dungeon tons easier:
>>
>>>Exit
>>
>> You exit the dungeon, returning to your physical body.
>>
>> A god-level R/L, where you are a deity, with appropriate goals and
>> opponents. Instead of gathering money, you gather worshippers, or souls.
>> Not too sure how you'd do this, actually - it works for an RPG but maybe
>> not so much for a R/L.
>
>*or* you make a R/L that can give you all these and any of these ideas.. :) 

An R/L where you start as a caveman and eventually become a god - each
dungeon that you beat fast-forwards you to the next one: stone age,
bronze age, medieval, modern, futuristic, godlike.
--
auric underscore underscore at hotmail dot com
*****
No, not really.
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 4:21:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Nolithius (Nolithius@hotmail.com) wrote:

> The recent Sid Meier's Pirates! remake also was of this incarnation. The
> game had some fun parts, but you had to divide your fleet and your money
> into your crew very often, effectively losing all but one ship, almost all
> your crew, and almost all your money.

Not your ships, not your money. Everyone gets their share.

> It was therefore extremely easy to
> take control of dozens of ships in minutes, but the game mechanics forced
> you to give them up. IMHO this was just bad design-- if it was in the
> original I truly don't think it excuses it-- when something's not fun it's
> just not fun


I quite like the episodic nature it gives to the game. In the original,
at every divvy up you had the opportunity to change difficulty levels
(or retire), which I think is a mechanic that sees too little use these
days.

Plus I'm not sure how long the Unstoppable MegaFleet of Doom would
remain fun. As things stand, it takes a bit of planning and preparation
to take on a major town. (I'm speaking of the original, as I haven't
yet purchased the remake.)

> (and old games, although they may hold a place in our hearts,
> sometimes have very poor design).

Pirates!, though, is one of the best games ever made. Well, I still
play it, at any rate. If it wasn't for crashing bugs (on my system, at
least) and int size cap on booty, I'd play it more. Very good fun-to-
bit ratio.

--
JTJ | http://www.kolumbus.fi/j.julkunen/
PRAY, v. To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf of
a single petitioner confessedly unworthy.
--Devil's Dictionary
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:12:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:

> Well the one thing I've found FP lacking in is Database support. Is there
> any sane way of doing it in 2?

Fair warning - I haven't touched any "real" Pascal code in years. After
reading Kornel's comments here, I decided to download FP 2.0 and have a
look.

In the example directory, there were subdirectories "mysql", "pgsql",
and "odbc". Whether or not the API is sane, I couldn't say, but it does
look like there's some kind of database support there.

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:14:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Kornel Kisielewicz wrote:

> Chceck out FCL and Lazarus.

If I wind up deleting Lazarus, will it come back?

:-)

sherm--

--
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Hire me! My resume: http://www.dot-app.org
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 3:41:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Sherm Pendley wrote:
> In the example directory, there were subdirectories "mysql", "pgsql",
> and "odbc". Whether or not the API is sane, I couldn't say...

It's Pascal. Take a wild freakin' guess. ;) 

--
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html
Palladium? Trusted Computing? DRM? Microsoft? Sauron.
"One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them
One ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them."
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 10:24:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

> Lochok wrote:
>> Well the one thing I've found FP lacking in is Database support. Is there
>> any sane way of doing it in 2?
>
> Of course not. If Mistress Compiler catches you with a "little black book"
> and suspects you've been seeing other women ... well, let's just say I
> hope you don't live anwhere close to or upwind of me. I'd rather not be in
> the primary fallout zone if and when that happens, thank you very much.
> It's certainly ludicrous to think she would actually provide assistance in
> accessing a little black book!
>
> But if you are a bit indirect about it, you might be able to pull the wool
> over her eyes. (Hint: try calling C code. There must be good C
> database-access libraries.)
>
Is it difficult to use C Code in FP?
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 6:19:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Sherm Pendley wrote:
> Kornel Kisielewicz wrote:
>
>> Chceck out FCL and Lazarus.
>
>
> If I wind up deleting Lazarus, will it come back?

Always ;-)
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"It's much easier to make an army of dumb good people than to
make one single smart good guy..." -- DarkGod
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 6:22:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:
>>Lochok wrote:
>>>Well the one thing I've found FP lacking in is Database support. Is there
>>>any sane way of doing it in 2?
>>
>>Of course not. If Mistress Compiler catches you with a "little black book"
>>and suspects you've been seeing other women ... well, let's just say I
>>hope you don't live anwhere close to or upwind of me. I'd rather not be in
>>the primary fallout zone if and when that happens, thank you very much.
>>It's certainly ludicrous to think she would actually provide assistance in
>>accessing a little black book!
>>
>>But if you are a bit indirect about it, you might be able to pull the wool
>>over her eyes. (Hint: try calling C code. There must be good C
>>database-access libraries.)
>
> Is it difficult to use C Code in FP?

Currently the only sane way is to create a C library and then using
h2pas convert the C header file to a pascal file.

But word spreads that there will be a possibility to directly link
against C object files. But what's the point anyway :-P?
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"The name of GenRogue, has become a warning against excessively
complex design." -- RGRD FAQ
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 8:42:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Speaking of pirate games, has anyone here ever played Uncharted Waters
(1 or 2, both SNES). They are really cool games and if the world/etc.
wasn't static, it would almost be a roguelike already. (These games
aren't specifically pirate games, more of high seas, but you can be a
pirate if you want. Just make sure you're a good swimmer if your boat
isn't up to the challenge.)
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 1:05:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

>>>>Well the one thing I've found FP lacking in is Database support. Is
>>>>there any sane way of doing it in 2?
>>>
>>>Of course not. If Mistress Compiler catches you with a "little black
>>>book" and suspects you've been seeing other women ... well, let's just
>>>say I hope you don't live anwhere close to or upwind of me. I'd rather
>>>not be in the primary fallout zone if and when that happens, thank you
>>>very much. It's certainly ludicrous to think she would actually provide
>>>assistance in accessing a little black book!
>>>
>>>But if you are a bit indirect about it, you might be able to pull the
>>>wool over her eyes. (Hint: try calling C code. There must be good C
>>>database-access libraries.)
>>
>> Is it difficult to use C Code in FP?
>
> Currently the only sane way is to create a C library and then using h2pas
> convert the C header file to a pascal file.
>
> But word spreads that there will be a possibility to directly link against
> C object files. But what's the point anyway :-P?

Hmmm... I think it's time to expand my language horizons....
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 4:37:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:
>>Currently the only sane way is to create a C library and then using h2pas
>>convert the C header file to a pascal file.
>>
>>But word spreads that there will be a possibility to directly link against
>>C object files. But what's the point anyway :-P?
>
> Hmmm... I think it's time to expand my language horizons....

Duh, I just recently decided to play with Lua. I've downloaded the
binary libraries and C headers, ran h2pas, compiled and... everything
worked :-D
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"11 years and no binary. And it's not vapourware" -- Igor Savin
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 8:39:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

ArchMageOmega (archmageomega@hotmail.com) wrote:
> Speaking of pirate games, has anyone here ever played Uncharted Waters
> (1 or 2, both SNES). They are really cool games and if the world/etc.
> wasn't static, it would almost be a roguelike already. (These games
> aren't specifically pirate games, more of high seas, but you can be a
> pirate if you want. Just make sure you're a good swimmer if your boat
> isn't up to the challenge.)

I've been meaning to check them out (an aquintance swears by them).
Also available on PC, check HOTU.

--
JTJ | http://www.kolumbus.fi/j.julkunen/
RADICALISM, n. The conservatism of to-morrow injected into the affairs
of to-day.
--Devil's Dictionary
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 9:51:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

> Lochok wrote:
>>>Currently the only sane way is to create a C library and then using h2pas
>>>convert the C header file to a pascal file.
>>>
>>>But word spreads that there will be a possibility to directly link
>>>against C object files. But what's the point anyway :-P?
>>
>> Hmmm... I think it's time to expand my language horizons....
>
> Duh, I just recently decided to play with Lua. I've downloaded the binary
> libraries and C headers, ran h2pas, compiled and... everything worked :-D
> --

BTW - Thanks for helping with this - it is much appreciated.

Lua is another language right?
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 9:51:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote::

> Lua is another language right?

Mostly a scripting language to be embedded in programs:
http://www.lua.org

--
c.u. Hajo
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 9:51:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.development (More info?)

Lochok wrote:
> BTW - Thanks for helping with this - it is much appreciated.

If you have any problems with FP, just mail me (at the address in the
signature, not the adress on the newsgroup).

> Lua is another language right?

Yup. A scripting language, and a realy cool one indeed ;-)
I link it with my game and have scripting abilities for free :-D
--
At your service,
Kornel Kisielewicz (charonATmagma-net.pl) [http://chaos.magma-net.pl]
"Shadows universe is non-heroic, unfair, cruel and designed to
start playing on your nerves and sanity." -- Anubis
!