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May 13, 2001 3:45:32 AM

Will a ddr Athlon board run SDR ram? I purchased an asus a7m reciently and was wondering if i had to get ddr ram, or if it could wait a while and run my sdr ram I already have till i have some spare cash for ddr?

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More about : quick question

May 13, 2001 3:49:43 AM

That depends. SDR and DDR can't be used interchangeably--they each take a different type of slot. Some motherboards have both types of slots; some only have one type. I believe you're talking about the A7M266; that one only has DDR slots.

Kelledin

bash-2.04$ kill -9 1
init: Just what do you think you're doing, Dave?
May 13, 2001 4:50:46 AM

Thanks! thats what i thought, but a freind and I had conflicting opinions. Guess my new t-bird 1.2 is gonna have to wait a few more days to be up and running.

Speaking of which, can I get any pointers on installing a HSF on my t-bird chip? I hear hellish stories about cracked cpu dies and I don't wanna be one. I have set up several pentium slot 1 and socket 370 systems, but this is my first AMD. I read the installation guide, and it seems easy enough, but i just want some tips from ne one. Here is a link to the HSF I wanna put on it <A HREF="http://www.store.yahoo.com/taisol/cgcopbas15.html" target="_new">http://www.store.yahoo.com/taisol/cgcopbas15.html&lt;/A>

Thanks for any help! :smile:

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May 13, 2001 5:23:37 AM

I'd say just stay away from Orbs. They seem to be the #1 T-bird crusher, and after handling one, I can see why. Also make sure your chosen HSF will fit your mobo.

I'm using a GlobalWin FOP32 and have had no problems with it. It's shaped so that it can fit any mobo, even if there are big electrolytic capacitors right next to the socket. It's currently keeping my 1.33 GHz at 40 C.

Kelledin

bash-2.04$ kill -9 1
init: Just what do you think you're doing, Dave?
May 13, 2001 5:40:31 AM

I second the fop32 I have yet to crush a chip with it yet. Or if your death, a better choice would be the fop 38 :) 

The installation technique I use is to place the non hinged clip on first by tilting the hsf at approx a 45 degree angle. When this clip is secure carefully palm the hsf and press down gently until the heatsink is properly placed on the cpu. Next, take a flathead screw driver of the right size and place it thru the slot on the hinged side. while still palming the hsf push the screw driver down until the hing is in place. Use your finger of the hand that is palming the heatsink to slide the hinged clip onto the socket tab. when secure you can take your palm of the heatsink. make sure to place the flathead screw driver into the slot which would be perpindicular to the heatsink and not parellel to it. If you try to do this with the screwdriver parellel then you could slip and damage your motherboard.

A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing!
May 13, 2001 11:31:22 AM

well.. I took a look at the hsf in the add you posted.. I'm not sure I'd try it.. but then again, folks who try new things can always tell us how it works out. Personally, I use the Swiftech MC462

<font color=red>It's ewe n' me against the world, n' I think ewe are gonna get creamed</font color=red> :eek: 
May 13, 2001 1:19:12 PM

The only pointer I have is use common sense. I was terrified when I got my Bird, but it was no problem at all. Just like any other installation I've done. Then only difference is putting grease on the die only, used to the older chips with metal on top. Personally I use an Alpha Pal-6035 (can't wait until an all copper Alpha, then they will be back on top).
May 13, 2001 2:28:47 PM

I posted no Add I think you meant to respond to another, just to clarify the link to the add which you mention is not a link to the HSF I was talking about.

A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing!
May 13, 2001 8:29:44 PM

Well it looked good due to the 3 stud clip. I read an article metioning how this guy swears upon these things cause its makes installing so much more easy. Also i think I heard the swifttech MC462 will not work with the Asus a7m mother board. I could be wrong cause I only read that on a web page. I also heard to stay away from alphas because the clip is supposible inferior to other hsfs and it exerts excessive pressure on the CPU die. I'm still really not sure which hsf I will get so keep the info coming. :smile:

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May 13, 2001 10:18:41 PM

Paulcalmond,

Your right.. the swiftech mc462-a cooler was a crap shoot.. it fit some boards and not others.. nevertheless, nothing a little modification couldn't fix... grind off one corner, use a little A/B epoxy, a 1" shorter bolt and a nut.. and that fixed it just grand!

Although I haven't tried the new cooler (I'm about to order another one for yet the 4 A7M266 and I'll likely make the mod again!

Who said necessitiy wasn't the muther of invention?

<font color=red>It's ewe n' me against the world, n' I think ewe are gonna get creamed</font color=red> :eek: 
May 13, 2001 10:34:52 PM

Ahhh sweet.. I was looking at it, but read the incompatibility with my mobo. I was actually think about getting the cooler right below that model. According to the site you linked me too all those coolers are on a 3-4 week wait :frown: I actually think I'm over doing it with that hsf any ways. I'm not looking to do any extreme over clocking if any just yet. I just want somethign that is fair priced and will keep my t-bird 1.2 ghz running cool. Thanks for all the help.

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May 14, 2001 4:26:58 AM

Just got done looking at a swifttech mc370-0a... this looks like a good cooler at a good price, and not over kill. :smile: Any one else use on of these?

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May 14, 2001 5:46:29 AM

I use that cooler. I think it's great! The installation is really, <b>really</b> simple. You don't have to worry about crushing the core because those springs help protect against that. And, they put just the right amount of pressure. It was worth the 45 bucks I paid for it.

As of now, I'm running a T-Bird 850, at stock speed (100FSB) and 1.75v. My idle temps are steady at 38.2°C with two 80mm high speed Sunon case fans running (front intake and rear exhaust). My temperature measurements are taken using a Compunurse thermistor taped to the outside of the heatsink. Ambient at 22°C (taken using that same Compunurse just removing it from the CPU and hanging it somewhere in the air until it stabilizes - not more than 2 minutes).

But, if this hasn't conviced you, just check out other reviews, such as this one from <A HREF="http://www.mikhailtech.com/articles/cooling/mc370/" target="_new">Mikhailtech.com</A>.

Anyways, if you still go for another cooler after all of this, I think purchasing a copper shim will ease the paranoia of a cracked core. (I haven't done this myself, just so you know.)

Hope this helps! :cool:

<i>OC...unless your computer's cheezy (is that a good rhyme?)</i> :eek: 
!