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Monitor help. ISP vs Non

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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December 16, 2012 11:42:01 PM

Okay so im trying to decide between a few monitors for my new setup.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... an samsung ISP monitor

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... an ASUS non ISP

I will mainly be using this for gaming, so whats the difference between ISP and non ISP

Thanks!

More about : monitor isp

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a b C Monitor
December 17, 2012 3:38:43 AM

Quote:
Okay so im trying to decide between a few monitors for my new setup.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... an samsung ISP monitor

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... an ASUS non ISP

I will mainly be using this for gaming, so whats the difference between ISP and non ISP

Thanks!



Hi - generally ISP monitors are preferred for more "color critical" uses and are generally
more expensive, however that's not the case here.
You stated that you will primarily use for gaming, select the 2nd monitor, the Asus.
The LG has a slow response time, 14ms vs 5ms for the Asus. You want the faster
response time for gaming.

Tom
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a b C Monitor
December 17, 2012 7:19:40 AM

This topic has been moved from the section Graphics & Displays to section Computer Peripherals by Mousemonkey
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a c 105 C Monitor
a b Ô Samsung
December 18, 2012 10:20:49 AM

any ips monitor offers a wide viewing angle. about 178/179 degrees without any noticible distortion.

quite a few tn panels will color shift or grey out at only a slight angle. some coatings reduce this but this is still a flaw in the panel type.

i prefer to use ips panels even for gaming for this very reason.

now if you spent more and bought a p-ips, h-ips or s-ips over a cheaper e-ips then you would gain color accuracy because the monitor is capable of displaying more colors.

on a 6bit monitor (tn, va, e-ips) some gradients may look strange like not enough colors can be displayed resulting in a grainy line where a gradient should be. if its not the picture which is the cause it most likely is the panel not being able to display the colors correctly which is why photo work is done on 8 or 10 bit panels.

i use an 8bit.

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even on the low end between tn, va and e-ips there still is not a clear winner. everything depends on what is important to you.
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a c 195 C Monitor
a b Ô Samsung
December 18, 2012 2:23:16 PM

ssddx said:
any ips monitor offers a wide viewing angle. about 178/179 degrees without any noticible distortion.


While e-IPS panel monitors offer wider viewing angles than TN panels, but not as wide as more expensive IPS technologies.


now if you spent more and bought a p-ips, h-ips or s-ips over a cheaper e-ips then you would gain color accuracy because the monitor is capable of displaying more colors.

on a 6bit monitor (tn, va, e-ips) some gradients may look strange like not enough colors can be displayed resulting in a grainy line where a gradient should be. said:

now if you spent more and bought a p-ips, h-ips or s-ips over a cheaper e-ips then you would gain color accuracy because the monitor is capable of displaying more colors.

on a 6bit monitor (tn, va, e-ips) some gradients may look strange like not enough colors can be displayed resulting in a grainy line where a gradient should be.


He is referring to something called temporal dithering. 8-bit panels can truly create 16.7 million colors. Each primary color (Red, Green, Blue) has 8 bits of data used to represent the number of possible shades for each color. Using binary math that means 256 shades of each primary color is possible; that's 2 multiplied itself 8 times (or expressed mathematically = 2^8). 256 shades of each primary color is 256 x 256 x 256 (or 256^3) which equals 16,777,216. 6-bit panels only use 6 bits of data to represent the shades of each primary color. That works out to 64 shades (2^6) of each primary color which means only 262,144 actual colors can be produced (64 x 64 x 64 = 64^3).

Temporal dithering basically means the if the monitor is trying to produce any of the 16.5 million colors the panel itself cannot normally produce, it relies on flashing between two colors extremely fast to produce the "desired" color. For example, if a TN or e-IPS panel monitor cannot produce the color purple normally, then it flashes extremely fast between Red and Blue to trick you into seeing solid purple. Good enough for the average person, not good enough it color accuracy is important because it is extremely difficult to impossible for the monitor to display the exact shade of purple consistently.
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December 28, 2012 3:14:45 PM

Best answer selected by Michael31.
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