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Transferring windows 7 license to a totally new machine.

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January 21, 2013 7:45:48 PM

Ok, so I have a rather strange question here. I have a very close friend who is having pc issues, is short on cash, and needs her pc for work. Where she lives (Russia) PCs are insanely expensive and there really are not any decent ones available. I offered to build her a new PC from scratch to cut down on cost, but the cost of a new windows install is prohibitive. She already has a valid windows 7 home premium license with her old PC, and the old PC will be going in the trash after proper cleanup, or possibly being reused with ubantu or something. Either way, the old PC will not be running windows 7 anymore. I figured I could install windows 7 fresh on the new PC and use her old license key to activate it once she gets it. Is there any issue with my logic here?

Here's where things get complicated. There is obviously a lot of distance involved, so I will have to assemble the PC and then mail it to her. She is not PC savvy, so having her do really any of the installation work is out of the question. She needs her old PC to continue functioning, poorly as it may be, right up to the point the new one gets there. Mail takes 3 weeks or so, which means it is absolutely out of the question that I activate the new pc before mailing it, since I assume that would knock the old one offline and she can't be out of work for three weeks, or even 3 days for that matter.

I need the new PC to be as close to ready to go for her as possible on arrival. I would love to be able to install all of the updates, antivirus, core programs she uses for work, etc before mailing it off so that she can just boot it up, call Microsoft and get it authorized, but I am not sure if this is possible. I know you can use a thumb drive with a downloaded official copy of windows 7 for the install, which I already have, so that part is not the real issue. The issue is whether I can load everything up for her prior to sending it off, because if I can't it's a no go for her. She'd rather take credit and pay for an overpriced hunk of junk that wrestle with a windows install. Not rational, I know, but such is life and it is not going to change.

So what I'm really asking, is whether I could use an official copy of windows 7 home premium on a thumb drive, and get the system the whole way up to operational before I register it? If need be I have a disc copy as well. Usually it says you have so many days to register your product, but will it allow me to install the updates etc? I don't want her to have to sit around for a day doing updates and installing programs.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks is advance.
a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 8:04:33 PM

Hi :) 

If that copy of 7 was OEM its illegal to put it on ANY OTHER MACHINE...

And it will say OEM on the COA sticker...

All the best Brett :) 
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January 21, 2013 8:09:57 PM


I freaking hate Microsoft
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January 21, 2013 8:16:00 PM


So there is no way to do this for under $200, despite the fact she already paid for windows 7?
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a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 8:21:53 PM

feeshta said:
So there is no way to do this for under $200, despite the fact she already paid for windows 7?



Hi :) 

She DIDN'T pay for windows on two machines only one.....

If she had bought a RETAIL 7 , she could swap it but she didn't...

All the best Brett :) 
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January 21, 2013 8:45:33 PM

I don't give a *** about Microsoft's bullshit semantics. She bought a retail PC, whose price included the price of windows. I don't know of any other software that is licensed only to one particular machine. To one running instance, sure, but not to one particular machine. What if you need to upgrade the machine? If I bought a new motherboard and cpu, that counts as a new PC and needs a new license? The only real difference is we are changing the case, because her old pc is an all in one that is not upgrade-able.

Microsoft is such a rip-off. I'd go with Linux in a second, but she would not be able to use it.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 8:50:23 PM

Just ring Microsoft support and say your old motherboard died so you took the chance to upgrade the system. It works 100% of the time.

Edit: Also, don't listen to Brett, he's a salesman, if you catch my drift.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 8:55:35 PM

Soda-88 said:
Just ring Microsoft support and say your old motherboard died so you took the chance to upgrade the system. It works 100% of the time.

Edit: Also, don't listen to Brett, he's a salesman, if you catch my drift.



Hi :) 

Actually it works around 10% of the time (going by the number of people buying NEW copies of 7 for this exact reason in my shops)...and as he is in Russia, I would guess even less....

And personal insults are against the rules here.... I am NOT a salesman :(  ..ugh...

I own several computer companies... big difference...

Insult reported...

And helping people try and avoid the law is also against Toms rules...

All the best Brett :) 
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January 21, 2013 9:02:36 PM

I'm not in Russia, my friend is.
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January 21, 2013 9:09:20 PM

you can get a license for windows 7 (OEM) for around $100. It's not transferable as you now know. Windows 8 is also around $100 for an OEM copy, but it is transferable (I'm pretty sure it is anyway, correct me if I'm wrong).
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January 21, 2013 9:10:31 PM

forgot to mention, there is a 30 day trial period for windows 7. You could get it set up before purchasing the license.
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 9:12:32 PM

feeshta said:
So there is no way to do this for under $200, despite the fact she already paid for windows 7?


Unfortunately, the licensing overlords at M$ were quite fond of this particular piece of blatant profiteering. The restriction has been removed in Windows 8, not that it is of any help in this situation though. Completely agree, they are a bunch of ripoff merchants, and monopolising ones at that.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 9:15:48 PM

Quote:
Unfortunately, the licensing overlords at M$ were quite fond of this particular piece of blatant profiteering. The restriction has been removed in Windows 8, not that it is of any help in this situation though. Completely agree, they are a bunch of ripoff merchants, and monopolising ones at that.



Hi :) 

Although i see your point, MS wrote the software and they are entitled to be paid for it...

The OEM was a cheaper version originally and now they are paying the price for that (or not lol) ...if they had bought a RETAIL 7 (more expensive) they COULD transfer it now...

All the best Brett :) 
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January 21, 2013 9:18:48 PM

We get it Brett, you're on their side. Now kindly butt out
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 9:28:02 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

Although i see your point, MS wrote the software and they are entitled to be paid for it...

All the best Brett :) 


They were paid for it when the machine was originally purchased. It's their license agreement that says you can't transfer it, not a piece of legislation. It's blatant profiteering, there is no technical or legal case for the restriction and is there solely to make M$ more $$$$$$.

M$ licensing costs are nothing short of insane out of a £200,000 virtualisation project we recently did about £130,000 of that was for M$ licenses, and that was just server software and CALs no client OS or client software.

"The OEM was a cheaper version originally and now they are paying the price for that"
One would assume the OEM version was pre-installed by the manufacturer. You're forced to have Windows OEM whether you want it or not, unless of course you go to an independent PC retailer like yourself, if buying from the likes of PC World you have no hope of getting any choice.

I remember a case a year or so ago where somone had bought a laptop at PC World, he didn't want Windows on it so when prompted he declined the EULA and took the laptop back to PC World who refused to refund the cost of Windows even though it says you are entitled to one right there in the EULA.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 9:29:26 PM

feeshta said:
We get it Brett, you're on their side. Now kindly butt out


Hi :) 

No you don't get it.....

Toms has rules, we are NOT allowed to assist in breaking the law....

You don't like it, argue with a Moderator....

All the best Brett :) 
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January 21, 2013 9:34:10 PM

The OEM version of windows hooks into the motherboard maker of the machine its origianlly installed on. So if the original machine has a Mobo made by a recognised vendor, Asus, Gigabyte etc, its likely that if the new machine has the same make of mobo then the O/S will work fine.

If the machine was a HP, Dell whatever then the O/S will not work on anything other than that make. Those people do not supply mobo's (except at absurd cost) so game over for the O/S.

Whilst using the same license on more than one machine is not and never has been ok, not being able to use an O/S that you have paid good money for on an upgraded machine is a fraud and disgrace. Especially when they have the bare faced cheek to offer a "retail" version at absurd cost.

So, if the original machine is a HP, Dell, that kind of thing, then no chance, but if it was a local build using a good 3rd party mobo, then it may still be ok.

Its just one of those reasons that people like me, look forward to seeing windows effectively put out of business by the likes of Linux, come the day...
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January 21, 2013 9:34:54 PM

Yes, I do get it, and I'm not talking about breaking the law, so butt out, before I go talk to the moderator for other reasons.
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 9:40:26 PM

OEM versions of Windows 7 are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:

- OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel

- OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on

- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard

- OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system


Microsoft.com ^


OEM vs. Retail

OEM Windows 7 comes preinstalled on computers. This is the cheapest way to buy windows. Large PC manufacturers like Dell, HP etc. (collectively called royalty OEMs) install windows on millions of such PCs. The main characteristics of such systems are:

The license agreement and support agreement is between you and the PC maker, not MS.

Activation by the end user is not required. Windows is preactivated at the factory by the OEM using images and standard SLP keys.

Your copy of windows is locked to that PC. The license is not transferable.

OEM system builder is what you get when you buy from say Newegg or from a local "white box" vendor. It too has the characteristics of Royalty OEM windows. Although it is possible for an individual to buy a System Builder copy, the license requires that the software be installed using the OPK (OEM preinstall kit) and then resold.

Retail version is what you buy from a retailer like Amazon or Bestbuy. Its a full price version that comes packaged in a retail box with a retail product key. It has to be activated online via MS servers using the key on the box, it is not tied to the PC it was first installed on, though it can only be used on a single computer at a time. And, MS directly provides the support for it. It is also more expensive than OEM copies.

As far as functionality is concerned, theres no difference between any of the versions above, given any specific edition (i.e. between OEM pro and retail pro, or between OEM ultimate and retail ultimate).


sevenforums.com

Windows 8 OEM is a whole different ballgame.

License agreement for the transfer of a Windows 8 license
http://personaluselicense.windows.com/en-US/default.asp...
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January 21, 2013 9:44:51 PM

mahatmacoat said:
The OEM version of windows hooks into the motherboard maker of the machine its origianlly installed on. So if the original machine has a Mobo made by a recognised vendor, Asus, Gigabyte etc, its likely that if the new machine has the same make of mobo then the O/S will work fine.

If the machine was a HP, Dell whatever then the O/S will not work on anything other than that make. Those people do not supply mobo's (except at absurd cost) so game over for the O/S.

Whilst using the same license on more than one machine is not and never has been ok, not being able to use an O/S that you have paid good money for on an upgraded machine is a fraud and disgrace. Especially when they have the bare faced cheek to offer a "retail" version at absurd cost.

So, if the original machine is a HP, Dell, that kind of thing, then no chance, but if it was a local build using a good 3rd party mobo, then it may still be ok.

Its just one of those reasons that people like me, look forward to seeing windows effectively put out of business by the likes of Linux, come the day...


The original machine is a Packard Bell Onetwo, and I wish so badly she would have asked me before buying that hunk of crap. It's non-upgradeable, it didn't come with a physical copy of Windows due to it having a recovery partition built in, and the recovery partition promptly got corrupted. That results in constant error messages, total non functionality of some applications that should be factory installed and are therefore impossible to uninstall and reinstall, and just general misery. Also, if you think Microsoft's service sucks in the US, try it is Russia sometime. They will laugh in your face an call you an idiot for even asking them to say provide a physical media for you to use to reinstall windows. It's a complete joke. It's no wonder there are so many hackers in Russia, you practically have to be one to own a PC there.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 9:49:11 PM

feeshta said:
Yes, I do get it, and I'm not talking about breaking the law, so butt out, before I go talk to the moderator for other reasons.



Hi :) 

Go right ahead...a Moderator has just posted what you need to know to avoid breaking the law....

And YES Microsoft T&C`s are legally enforceable....

All the best Brett :) 
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January 21, 2013 9:52:53 PM

So what are opinions of best options moving forward? Linux is not an option, and I am not sure if she would want windows 8. I've heard conflicting reports about whether windows 8 can be setup to function in a normal windows setup rather than the crappy "live tiles", which I am sure she would despise. I do know windows 8 allows the user to switch the language settings, which would be a wonderful feature to have when she inevitably asks me to make some program work for her, as I don't speak Russian. Basically it comes down to Windows 7 Home Premium Vs Windows 8, and the end user is HIGHLY resistant to any major changes in how their machine functions. I'm sure she would not be willing to fork over the extra $100 for 7 Ultimate, just to get the ability to change languages, which should have been built into the basic version decades ago.
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 9:52:59 PM

There's enough info in this thread to help feeshta.He can proceed with the info he has been given.
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January 21, 2013 9:53:16 PM

Why not install Ubuntu w/ the software W.I.N.E it makes Ubuntu/Linux/BSD free/Solar compatible with almost every windows 7 software, and it's free.. Can't beat free compatibility w/ a better looking operating system. I think it is legal in Russia because it's legal in the U.S and it's open source. SO here it is W.I.N.E: http://www.winehq.org/
Ubuntu: http://www.ubuntu.com/
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January 21, 2013 9:54:02 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

Go right ahead...a Moderator has just posted what you need to know to avoid breaking the law....

And YES Microsoft T&C`s are legally enforceable....

All the best Brett :) 


How many times do I have to ask you to politely leave the conversation? Seriously....
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January 21, 2013 9:55:39 PM

Palidrome said:
Why not install Ubuntu w/ the software W.I.N.E it makes Ubuntu/Linux/BSD free/Solar compatible with almost every windows 7 software, and it's free.. Can't beat free compatibility w/ a better looking operating system. I think it is legal in Russia because it's legal in the U.S and it's open source. SO here it is W.I.N.E: http://www.winehq.org/
Ubuntu: http://www.ubuntu.com/


In case it was not clear, the end user is not computer savvy, and doesn't want to be. You might as well ask her to convert to satanism, you'd get the same result.
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January 21, 2013 9:57:15 PM

SR-71 Blackbird said:
There's enough info in this thread to help feeshta.He can proceed with the info he has been given.


So should I start a new thread to ask opinions on Windows 7 Home Premium vs Windows 8 in this situation?
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 10:00:08 PM

Sure, that sounds great.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 10:00:14 PM

feeshta said:
How many times do I have to ask you to politely leave the conversation? Seriously....



Hi :) 

This is a discussion forum, YOU do not get a choice when or whether I contribute to this thread...

The Moderators do , but you do not...

And buy 7 Home premium its the cheapest for your purpose apart from 8...

All the best Brett :) 
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January 21, 2013 10:01:08 PM

I think Brett is trying to help you, and he is right as you can see by the post from the Moderator. I don't see how you'd be able to install the Windows for her and have it work in Russia for her. The software is US bought and by the key included MS would know that. However there are some websites that sell MS very cheaply online if you look I'm sure you'll find them, and you can include the installation disk when you ship the machine to her, just copy the key before you send it, so you can help with the install. You can use Skype on her old computer to walk her thru the installation have her point the webcam at the screen so you know where in the process she is at all times. I think it would be better to let your friend find the O/S in Russia. You're saving her a lot already on the hardware. Doesn't she have friends and/or workmates that can help her there?
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 10:01:29 PM

If you want to choose a best answer,go ahead.If not i'll just close it.
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January 21, 2013 10:02:27 PM

the desktop in windows 8 is the same as in windows 7. The only real difference is that the start menu is gone. The start page (metro) is basically a big start menu that uses tiles. It would probably take her a few days to get used to it, can't say if she would like it as it comes down to personal opinion.
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January 21, 2013 10:04:22 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

This is a discussion forum, YOU do not get a choice when or whether I contribute to this thread...

The Moderators do , but you do not...

And buy 7 Home premium its the cheapest for your purpose apart from 8...

All the best Brett :) 


It's called common courtesy. When someone makes it clear you are not welcome, it's usually best to politely excuse yourself any leave well enough alone. I asked you to butt out of the conversation, you chose to rudely ignore my request and continue to inert yourself into conversation where you were unwelcome. Common courtesy should not be suspended in the case of a discussion forum. I think the moderators would agree with that wholeheartedly.
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a c 395 $ Windows 7
January 21, 2013 10:05:23 PM

This topic has been closed by SR-71 Blackbird
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