SP2 - need to update BIOS?

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
reason. Is this really necessary, if everything appears to be working
ok?
25 answers Last reply
More about update bios
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Good question. BIOS is something that you only update if you need to.

    SP 2 is, in essence, a major upgrade to Windows XP. It's a good idea to
    update the BIOS before upgrading your operating system, ergo Dell's
    recommendation.

    If you carefully follow Dell's instructions for updating your BIOS, the
    process is safe. The rap against updating the BIOS is based on the fact that
    if you mess up, or if there's a power surge or interruption while the update
    is proceeding, your computer becomes a paperweight. Not permanently, but
    it's a royal pain to get it going again. So, don't update the BIOS without
    good reason. Installing SP 2 is a good enough reason.

    Now, will your computer work properly if you install SP 2 without updating
    the BIOS? Probably, but I'm not qualified to say that definitively.
    --
    Ted Zieglar


    "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com...
    > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
    > But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
    > reason. Is this really necessary, if everything appears to be working
    > ok?
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Steve wrote:

    > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
    > But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
    > reason. Is this really necessary, if everything appears to be working
    > ok?
    >

    What model is it and what BIOS version is it?

    FWIW, I upgraded a Dimension 4500, 4550, 8100, 8200 as well as an
    Inspiron 1100 with no issues at all.

    Bob
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com...
    > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
    > But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
    > reason. Is this really necessary, if everything appears to be working
    > ok?
    >
    I upgraded an 8200 to SP2 without changing the BIOS with no apparent problems.
    (The thinking was if there were significant issues they would have popped up
    by now.)

    Bill
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I used a site to help update a computer today. I did not follow all of the
    direction, but some. The update went well on my 8300.
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/spackins.htm


    "Bill" <xxx@yy.zz> wrote in message
    news:EAJZc.7154$ZC7.707@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
    > "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    > news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com...
    >> Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
    >> But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
    >> reason. Is this really necessary, if everything appears to be working
    >> ok?
    >>
    > I upgraded an 8200 to SP2 without changing the BIOS with no apparent
    > problems. (The thinking was if there were significant issues they would
    > have popped up by now.)
    >
    > Bill
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Thu, 2 Sep 2004 10:25:18 -0400 Ted Zieglar aka "Rocky" wrote:

    > If you carefully follow Dell's instructions for updating your BIOS, the
    > process is safe.

    I have an (German) Dimension 8250 with BIOS-Version Dell A02. I
    couldn't find any information on the German Dell site. Could you give
    me some links for the English site to gather some information if an
    upgrade is necessary and how it has to be done? Thank you.

    Hans
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    It's probably not necessary to update the BIOS unless you're having
    problems. That said, I wanted to try it myself with my Dell 2400. It came
    preinstalled with BIOS version A02 and I downloaded and installed version
    A05. Very easy.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com...
    > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
    > But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
    > reason.

    That's old think. Always flash the latest BIOS but carefully.

    > Is this really necessary, if everything appears to be working
    > ok?

    It's necessary for SP2 if you have a Prescott CPU on a 865 or 875 chipset
    mobo.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote in message
    news:fgSZc.547122$Gx4.431198@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    > "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    > news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com...
    >> Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
    >> But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
    >> reason.
    >
    > That's old think. Always flash the latest BIOS but carefully.
    >

    <snip>


    Flashing a BIOS is actually very easy to do, whether it works as designed or
    turns your mainboard into a TV tray.

    Beware of others using superlatives in their advice (always, never, best,
    worst, everybody, no one, etc....).


    Stew
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ted Zieglar aka "Rocky"" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:T1GZc.60394$7y4.48071@roc.nntpserver.com...
    > Good question. BIOS is something that you only update if you need to.

    That's old think. Always flash the latest BIOS but carefully.

    > SP 2 is, in essence, a major upgrade to Windows XP. It's a good idea to
    > update the BIOS before upgrading your operating system, ergo Dell's
    > recommendation.
    >
    > If you carefully follow Dell's instructions for updating your BIOS, the
    > process is safe.

    And has been in most all cases for years now.

    > The rap against updating the BIOS is based on the fact that
    > if you mess up, or if there's a power surge or interruption while the
    update
    > is proceeding, your computer becomes a paperweight.

    NOPE, just a slightly tedious process of replacing a BIOS chip.

    > Not permanently, but
    > it's a royal pain to get it going again. So, don't update the BIOS without
    > good reason.

    Nope, just don't do it when/where a power outage may be pending.

    > Installing SP 2 is a good enough reason.

    The existence of a more recent BIOS is a good enough reason.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    What a smart guy you are: You can even tell when a power outage is pending.
    Or maybe you're just a smart alec.

    Ted Zieglar

    "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote in message
    news:jjSZc.547133$Gx4.530276@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    > "Ted Zieglar aka "Rocky"" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:T1GZc.60394$7y4.48071@roc.nntpserver.com...
    > > Good question. BIOS is something that you only update if you need to.
    >
    > That's old think. Always flash the latest BIOS but carefully.
    >
    > > SP 2 is, in essence, a major upgrade to Windows XP. It's a good idea to
    > > update the BIOS before upgrading your operating system, ergo Dell's
    > > recommendation.
    > >
    > > If you carefully follow Dell's instructions for updating your BIOS, the
    > > process is safe.
    >
    > And has been in most all cases for years now.
    >
    > > The rap against updating the BIOS is based on the fact that
    > > if you mess up, or if there's a power surge or interruption while the
    > update
    > > is proceeding, your computer becomes a paperweight.
    >
    > NOPE, just a slightly tedious process of replacing a BIOS chip.
    >
    > > Not permanently, but
    > > it's a royal pain to get it going again. So, don't update the BIOS
    without
    > > good reason.
    >
    > Nope, just don't do it when/where a power outage may be pending.
    >
    > > Installing SP 2 is a good enough reason.
    >
    > The existence of a more recent BIOS is a good enough reason.
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "History Fan" <IHateSPAM!@IreallyHATESPAm.com> wrote in message
    news:jNLZc.289842$fv.27550@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
    > It's probably not necessary to update the BIOS unless you're having
    > problems. That said, I wanted to try it myself with my Dell 2400. It
    came
    > preinstalled with BIOS version A02 and I downloaded and installed version
    > A05. Very easy.

    And quite safe with due caution.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ted Zieglar aka Rocky" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:uvSZc.63343$7y4.7918@roc.nntpserver.com...
    > What a smart guy you are: You can even tell when a power outage is
    pending.
    > Or maybe you're just a smart alec.

    Get a clue. In most all places in the USA today power outages occur once in
    a blue moon. Figure out the odds of a random unpredictable power outage
    hitting in the 30 second period while the BIOS is acutally being updated.
    Better start worrying about gaint meteroid impacts instead! If you are in a
    situation where power is generally unstable or there's a lightning storm in
    town then DON'T flash.

    > Ted Zieglar
    >
    > "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote in message
    > news:jjSZc.547133$Gx4.530276@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > >
    > > "Ted Zieglar aka "Rocky"" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:T1GZc.60394$7y4.48071@roc.nntpserver.com...
    > > > Good question. BIOS is something that you only update if you need to.
    > >
    > > That's old think. Always flash the latest BIOS but carefully.
    > >
    > > > SP 2 is, in essence, a major upgrade to Windows XP. It's a good idea
    to
    > > > update the BIOS before upgrading your operating system, ergo Dell's
    > > > recommendation.
    > > >
    > > > If you carefully follow Dell's instructions for updating your BIOS,
    the
    > > > process is safe.
    > >
    > > And has been in most all cases for years now.
    > >
    > > > The rap against updating the BIOS is based on the fact that
    > > > if you mess up, or if there's a power surge or interruption while the
    > > update
    > > > is proceeding, your computer becomes a paperweight.
    > >
    > > NOPE, just a slightly tedious process of replacing a BIOS chip.
    > >
    > > > Not permanently, but
    > > > it's a royal pain to get it going again. So, don't update the BIOS
    > without
    > > > good reason.
    > >
    > > Nope, just don't do it when/where a power outage may be pending.
    > >
    > > > Installing SP 2 is a good enough reason.
    > >
    > > The existence of a more recent BIOS is a good enough reason.
    > >
    > >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Fri, 03 Sep 2004 04:21:35 GMT Ron Reaugh wrote:

    >> If you carefully follow Dell's instructions for updating your BIOS, the
    >> process is safe.
    >
    > And has been in most all cases for years now.

    Same question again:
    Where do I find these instructions? Have you a link?
    Hans
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On flashing a BIOS...

    Yes, as long as one has the correct BIOS update and follows the manufacturer's
    instructions exactly, a BIOS update is not risky. The major risk of a failed
    BIOS update and a comatose motherboard is from a power outage, so it's a good
    idea not to run a flash BIOS update in the midst of an electrical storm or when
    trucks from the local power company are parked outside.

    As a rule, the BIOS manufacturer (in this case, Dell) builds enough safeguards
    into the flash BIOS software to prevent flashing with the wrong BIOS and to keep
    people out of trouble. Occasionally, it is useful to know how to defeat these
    safeguards, but that is beyond the scope of what most people need to do.

    As to the downside of a failed flash BIOS update, the consequences are
    considerable. The "slightly tedious process of replacing a BIOS chip" involves
    de-soldering the old chip and soldering on a new chip, at least on all the
    current Dell models. Any de-soldering and soldering of chips on modern circuit
    boards requires far more sophisticated equipment than can be found at Home
    Depot, Lowes, or any other fairly common outlet for tools. Um, this is far more
    than "slightly tedious".

    Socketed flash BIOS chips, which are really easy to replace, fell into disfavor
    in the early Pentium era, a victim of cost savings. I have seen a few socketed
    BIOS chips on modern motherboards, but they are few and far between. IBM
    NetVista desktops have socketed BIOS chips.

    There are two other possibilities for taking care of a failed flash BIOS update.
    One is a BIOS recovery procedure, IF AND ONLY IF documented by the board
    manufacturer. Intel-branded boards with a generic Intel BIOS have a
    well-documented BIOS recovery procedure that works as long as the BIOS boot
    block is not destroyed by the failed flash BIOS update.

    The other approach is to use fairly sophisticated and uncommon equipment
    designed to inject a flash BIOS onto the chip soldered onto the motherboard.
    You might find this sort of equipment in test labs at Intel, Dell, HPaq, or
    Gateway. In essence, you plug a self-contained single-board computer into a PCI
    slot on a failed motherboard, the live single-board computer finds the BIOS chip
    through standard Intel port hand-shaking procedures, and writes a new BIOS
    image.

    As to the necessity of flashing a BIOS, for many years the rule of thumb is to
    update a BIOS to correct errors or add features which are important for ones use
    of ones own computer. With a mainstream BIOS like a generic Intel one, there
    are almost always documents which provide an audit trail of all the corrections
    and changes made with each BIOS revision. I would suggest reading these
    documents to see exactly what sorts of changes have been incorporated into the
    BIOS over time. Be prepared to decipher some very much engineering-oriented
    language and some obscure terminology.

    If Dell recommends a BIOS update as a prelude to installing SP2, have at it if
    you like. Frankly, unless there are detailed reasons explaining why a flash
    update is needed for SP2, I think this is a knee-jerk reaction on the part of
    Dell, who have undoubtedly tested SP2 almost exclusively on the newest computers
    with the newest BIOS firmware.

    For various reasons, I've done flash BIOS updates of thousands of motherboards
    in the past 10 or 11 years, and I still look outside at the sky and at the
    nearby power poles before running a flash update. I have never once had the
    need to remove a soldered-on chip from a board, do not have the equipment to do
    so, and never expect to get the equipment to do it.

    Finally, if one still manages to end up with a dead motherboard from flashing
    the BIOS, even with all the built-in safeguards and caveats, the quickest and
    most straightforward action to get a live system again is to replace the
    motherboard... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 04:21:35 GMT, "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote:

    >
    >"Ted Zieglar aka "Rocky"" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:T1GZc.60394$7y4.48071@roc.nntpserver.com...
    >> Good question. BIOS is something that you only update if you need to.
    >
    >That's old think. Always flash the latest BIOS but carefully.
    >
    >> SP 2 is, in essence, a major upgrade to Windows XP. It's a good idea to
    >> update the BIOS before upgrading your operating system, ergo Dell's
    >> recommendation.
    >>
    >> If you carefully follow Dell's instructions for updating your BIOS, the
    >> process is safe.
    >
    >And has been in most all cases for years now.
    >
    >> The rap against updating the BIOS is based on the fact that
    >> if you mess up, or if there's a power surge or interruption while the
    >update
    >> is proceeding, your computer becomes a paperweight.
    >
    >NOPE, just a slightly tedious process of replacing a BIOS chip.
    >
    >> Not permanently, but
    >> it's a royal pain to get it going again. So, don't update the BIOS without
    >> good reason.
    >
    >Nope, just don't do it when/where a power outage may be pending.
    >
    >> Installing SP 2 is a good enough reason.
    >
    >The existence of a more recent BIOS is a good enough reason.
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >If Dell recommends a BIOS update as a prelude to installing SP2, have at it if
    >you like. Frankly, unless there are detailed reasons explaining why a flash
    >update is needed for SP2, I think this is a knee-jerk reaction on the part of
    >Dell, who have undoubtedly tested SP2 almost exclusively on the newest computers
    >with the newest BIOS firmware.

    Not to mention that probably 99% of Dell's home PC customers have no
    idea what the heck a BIOS is, let alone how to update it. So all of
    those SP2 installations are gonna be without a new BIOS.

    Thanks for all the info!
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
    news:IbWZc.54199$N11.5171@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
    >
    > "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote in message
    > news:fgSZc.547122$Gx4.431198@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > >
    > > "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    > > news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com...
    > >> Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing SP2.
    > >> But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very good
    > >> reason.
    > >
    > > That's old think. Always flash the latest BIOS but carefully.
    > >
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >
    > Flashing a BIOS is actually very easy to do, whether it works as designed
    or
    > turns your mainboard into a TV tray.
    >
    > Beware of others using superlatives in their advice (always, never, best,
    > worst, everybody, no one, etc....).

    Beware of trolls who do not contribute to threads but just waste bandwidth.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:41386c3a.2713203@news.charter.net...
    > On flashing a BIOS...
    >
    > Yes, as long as one has the correct BIOS update and follows the
    manufacturer's
    > instructions exactly, a BIOS update is not risky. The major risk of a
    failed
    > BIOS update and a comatose motherboard is from a power outage, so it's a
    good
    > idea not to run a flash BIOS update in the midst of an electrical storm or
    when
    > trucks from the local power company are parked outside.
    >
    > As a rule, the BIOS manufacturer (in this case, Dell) builds enough
    safeguards
    > into the flash BIOS software to prevent flashing with the wrong BIOS and
    to keep
    > people out of trouble. Occasionally, it is useful to know how to defeat
    these
    > safeguards, but that is beyond the scope of what most people need to do.
    >
    > As to the downside of a failed flash BIOS update, the consequences are
    > considerable. The "slightly tedious process of replacing a BIOS chip"
    involves
    > de-soldering the old chip and soldering on a new chip, at least on all the
    > current Dell models. Any de-soldering and soldering of chips on modern
    circuit
    > boards requires far more sophisticated equipment than can be found at Home
    > Depot, Lowes, or any other fairly common outlet for tools. Um, this is
    far more
    > than "slightly tedious".

    Dell solders in the BIOS chip...hmm...look for another vendor as noboby else
    does that.

    > Socketed flash BIOS chips, which are really easy to replace, fell into
    disfavor
    > in the early Pentium era, a victim of cost savings.

    Not with competent vendors.

    > I have seen a few socketed
    > BIOS chips on modern motherboards, but they are few and far between.

    Utter nonsense. Checkout any Intel, Asus, Abit, Gigabyte.....etc. mobo and
    all are socketed BIOS!

    Did you just make your post up from neverland as the rest of the drivel is
    snipped?
  18. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    news:netgj0l3qq7940u492lg0vm1ciic3va81q@4ax.com...
    > ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    > >If Dell recommends a BIOS update as a prelude to installing SP2, have at
    it if
    > >you like. Frankly, unless there are detailed reasons explaining why a
    flash
    > >update is needed for SP2, I think this is a knee-jerk reaction on the
    part of
    > >Dell, who have undoubtedly tested SP2 almost exclusively on the newest
    computers
    > >with the newest BIOS firmware.
    >
    > Not to mention that probably 99% of Dell's home PC customers have no
    > idea what the heck a BIOS is, let alone how to update it. So all of
    > those SP2 installations are gonna be without a new BIOS.

    Yep, a new BIOS is needed for 865/875 chipset mobos using Prescott, Celeron
    D and Extreme Edition CPUs for SP2. The very great majority of other user
    will be just fine without a BIOS flash doing SP2.

    If you learn how then flash the latest BIOS always anyway.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Steve <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in
    news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com:

    > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing
    > SP2. But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very
    > good reason. Is this really necessary, if everything appears to
    > be working ok?
    >
    I don't know of any specific reason, but if you think it through:

    Q1: For which version of the BIOS do you think Dell will actively
    provide support (at best :-) ?
    A1: The latest released version.

    Q2: If a problem occurs about which they haven't a clue, and you
    are not running the latest released BIOS version, what support
    advice will you receive?
    A2: Upgrade to the latest released BIOS version and try again.

    Q3: If you report a problem with the XP SP2 upgrade, what is the
    likely first response from Dell?
    A3: See Q1, then Q2 and work it out for yourself.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Frank le Spikkin" <zaq@invalid.jp> wrote in message
    news:Xns955A171468674FlSxxx@130.133.1.4...
    > Steve <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in
    > news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com:
    >
    > > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing
    > > SP2. But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a very
    > > good reason. Is this really necessary, if everything appears to
    > > be working ok?
    > >
    > I don't know of any specific reason, but if you think it through:
    >
    > Q1: For which version of the BIOS do you think Dell will actively
    > provide support (at best :-) ?
    > A1: The latest released version.
    >
    > Q2: If a problem occurs about which they haven't a clue, and you
    > are not running the latest released BIOS version, what support
    > advice will you receive?
    > A2: Upgrade to the latest released BIOS version and try again.
    >
    > Q3: If you report a problem with the XP SP2 upgrade, what is the
    > likely first response from Dell?
    > A3: See Q1, then Q2 and work it out for yourself.

    It's been obvious to all but the clueless that the rule for the competent
    for quite some time has been to always flash the latest BIOS carefully.
    >
  21. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote in
    news:i_8_c.302484$OB3.122452@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:

    >
    > "Frank le Spikkin" <zaq@invalid.jp> wrote in message
    > news:Xns955A171468674FlSxxx@130.133.1.4...
    >> Steve <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in
    >> news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com:
    >>
    >> > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing
    >> > SP2. But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a
    >> > very good reason. Is this really necessary, if everything
    >> > appears to be working ok?
    >> >
    >> I don't know of any specific reason, but if you think it
    >> through:
    >>
    >> Q1: For which version of the BIOS do you think Dell will
    >> actively provide support (at best :-) ?
    >> A1: The latest released version.
    >>
    >> Q2: If a problem occurs about which they haven't a clue, and
    >> you are not running the latest released BIOS version, what
    >> support advice will you receive?
    >> A2: Upgrade to the latest released BIOS version and try again.
    >>
    >> Q3: If you report a problem with the XP SP2 upgrade, what is
    >> the likely first response from Dell?
    >> A3: See Q1, then Q2 and work it out for yourself.
    >
    > It's been obvious to all but the clueless that the rule for the
    > competent for quite some time has been to always flash the
    > latest BIOS carefully.

    Whereas many prefer "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".
  22. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Frank le Spikkin" <zaq@invalid.jp> wrote in message
    news:Xns955A1E23A418BFlSxxx@130.133.1.4...
    > "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote in
    > news:i_8_c.302484$OB3.122452@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:
    >
    > >
    > > "Frank le Spikkin" <zaq@invalid.jp> wrote in message
    > > news:Xns955A171468674FlSxxx@130.133.1.4...
    > >> Steve <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in
    > >> news:84aej0tbkgsdt09r8ijvsegmdthkvpun5c@4ax.com:
    > >>
    > >> > Dell recommends updating to the latest BIOS before installing
    > >> > SP2. But I sure hate to mess with the BIOS unless there's a
    > >> > very good reason. Is this really necessary, if everything
    > >> > appears to be working ok?
    > >> >
    > >> I don't know of any specific reason, but if you think it
    > >> through:
    > >>
    > >> Q1: For which version of the BIOS do you think Dell will
    > >> actively provide support (at best :-) ?
    > >> A1: The latest released version.
    > >>
    > >> Q2: If a problem occurs about which they haven't a clue, and
    > >> you are not running the latest released BIOS version, what
    > >> support advice will you receive?
    > >> A2: Upgrade to the latest released BIOS version and try again.
    > >>
    > >> Q3: If you report a problem with the XP SP2 upgrade, what is
    > >> the likely first response from Dell?
    > >> A3: See Q1, then Q2 and work it out for yourself.
    > >
    > > It's been obvious to all but the clueless that the rule for the
    > > competent for quite some time has been to always flash the
    > > latest BIOS carefully.
    >
    > Whereas many prefer "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".

    If there is a more recent BIOS then you can assume that it is broken or
    eventually will be. PREEMPT!
    >
  23. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 00:47:35 GMT, "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote:

    <SNIP>
    >
    >Dell solders in the BIOS chip...hmm...look for another vendor as noboby else
    >does that.

    Nobody does that? I must confess that I have not seen all brands of
    motherboards, but most of the ones I have seen DO have a soldered BIOS chip, I
    repeat, for cost reasons. Yeah, they save maybe a dime on a socket, but the
    nickels and dimes add up in a factory bill of materials.

    What business do you have posting here if you didn't even know that Dell
    motherboards have soldered BIOS chips?

    >
    >> Socketed flash BIOS chips, which are really easy to replace, fell into
    >disfavor
    >> in the early Pentium era, a victim of cost savings.
    >
    >Not with competent vendors.

    Competent? It's not a quesiton of competence. It is simply a question of
    costs. As long as consumers demand low-priced computers, manufacturers at all
    levels of the food chain will look for the pennies, nickels, and dimes in
    savings.

    >
    >> I have seen a few socketed
    >> BIOS chips on modern motherboards, but they are few and far between.
    >
    >Utter nonsense. Checkout any Intel, Asus, Abit, Gigabyte.....etc. mobo and
    >all are socketed BIOS!

    INTEL sockets its BIOS chips???? Hell, no! When I'm not ripping apart name
    brand computers, I'm building custom systems with INTEL motherboards with D845,
    D865, and D875 chipsets. Not one of the Intel-brand boards has a socket for the
    flash chip. All are soldered onto the board. Of the name-brands I've serviced
    and upgraded (including Gateway, IBM, Compaq, HP, eMachines-UGH), only IBM
    motherboards seem show up with socketed BIOS chips.

    I agree with you. To best protect the buyer against catastrophic BIOS failures,
    the BIOS chip oughta be socketed. But it does not happen too much any more.

    >
    >Did you just make your post up from neverland as the rest of the drivel is
    >snipped?
    >
    I've got more years of experience in the computer industry than most people on
    this planet have lived, going back to the large air-conditioned rooms with disk
    drives the size of pizza ovens, paper tape, punched cards, and ferrite core
    memory. I make up all this drivel out my head, from many years of practical
    experience, in most recent years working with any and all brands of computers,
    mostly with Intel CPUs, some Sun and other exotic beasts. How about you? What
    are your credentials? Do you have much hands-on experience with Dells?
  24. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Where do I find the current BIOS version? Tried Control Panel >
    System, doesn't seem to be there. Thanks!
  25. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Windows doesn't know nothing about no BIOS :)

    Usually when you boot the machine, one of the fast scrolling messages (as
    long as you are not in quiet mode) is the BIOS version.

    Also, if you actually enter the BIOS, the version is usually listed on the
    first page.

    Tom
    "Steve" <xfr@xvzvx.com> wrote in message
    news:09flj0dbvdi8rljge3p34me59l02gm4j9n@4ax.com...
    > Where do I find the current BIOS version? Tried Control Panel >
    > System, doesn't seem to be there. Thanks!
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