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Looking for comments from fellow experienced IT professionals!

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May 9, 2012 3:27:33 PM

I have a situation that I need help from the community on!
I am a 20+ year IT professional that dives into all aspects of IT as well as all OS’s

My employer is not in a technology driven field. It’s just me in IT and I do everything IT related.
Here is a summary of what we have. I have a 2003 server with Terminal Services enabled that the users use to run a proprietary ERP system that is made with Microsoft Access. This computer is running on a Dell Poweredge 1850 – with 2 hard drives in a NON RAID format, just a data drive as well as an OS drive.
I have another server here that is the same machine, a Dell Poweredge 1850 – also with no RAID configuration. This system runs IIS services and Microsoft SQL that communicates with the first server mentioned and takes the data and dynamically updates their website. Both servers are in an Active Directory structure. I have 2 other servers, one being Linux, for a collaboration system, and the other is being made into a new ERP system with new software.
Here’s what happened.

Last Thursday (May 3rd, 2012) an employee with a fairly new laptop with about 6 months of custom data on it, approached me and said that his computer just suddenly froze, and when he restarts, it just goes to a blinking cursor. So I take the machine and turn it on, and notice right away that the Hard Drive is not showing up during POST. I take the laptop apart and pull the drive, and place it on my SATA to USB adapter and try firing it up, the drive doesn’t even spin up. I ask about backups and there are none that have been made. So I tell him I will come up with a plan for tomorrow and end the day. This laptop had all of our forms and documents over the last 6 months, that are very crucial to the company.

Friday morning, I come in and everyone is telling me that the whole system is down, the usual information, and nothing more, so I go to look at the first server I mentioned (the TS and ERP machine) server and its stuck on the RAID configuration after BIOS and the messages across the screen are the drives spun up, but one is missing. I comfirmed the drive not available to be the OS drive of the server ( C: ) and run it to a server shop one building down and ask them if they have any USCSI available to hook the drive up and see if it fails, to quickly locate the issue.
They confirm spin-up but not recognizable. So…. What’s on the list for today???? 2 dead drives on 2 critical devices. The only thing that exists for help on the server is a VMware image I had made several months back.

The data for the ERP system is stored on the other hard drive, and it appeared to be functional, I decide since the backups for the server consisted of only data, I need to rebuild the OS and get the program running and synchronized. Here’s a list of the things done:
1. Got new hard drive into server
2. Installed 2003 server
3. Found and updated all driver’s to get internet access
4. Ran all the SP’s and updates
5. Installed MS Office – note that I have no product keys other than a Virtual Machine snapshot I had of the server from months back.
6. Installed and configured Terminal Services into Application Mode
7. Installed IIS and configured
8. Recreated the Active Directory structure and established the Domain.
9. Copied over the Access .accdb file and began to attempt to run it, with nothing but missing DLL errors
10. Hand copied and registered DLL after DLL until it finally got to a login screen
11. Access indicates the database is corrupt, finally pinpoint it down to an update in Microsoft Access.
12. Recreated ODBC connections to counter OBDC errors
13. Went to start Internet explorer to download a print driver, and the shortcut to IE was not associated??????

This list is obviously a list of the larger tasks that had to be done, we all know that in between all this, there are thousands of teeny tasks that need to be done to accommodate this, such as trying a USB hub and realizing it doesn’t work with the USB devices, or trying to run Office and realizing that it does not have SP1 or the best, running a configuration change and walking away, only to come back 20 minutes later to a prompt that says “Please insert 2003 Server CD 1”

While all this is going on, I had the laptop that was dead to deal with, after trying several things to get it going such as a tap to the spindle area I realized I had to do a last resort. The drive was taken to Geek Squad, and told it was unrecoverable, but at a cost of $500 to $2,000 they could have professional data recovery. I opened the drive and exposed it briefly to air, but got in and spun it by hand, you could hear the whine of seized bearings, but it did spin up! I was able to get chunks of data off the drive, hand spinning and closing it up as needed until I ultimately got all the data!! I began to rebuilt the OS for the laptop and started setting up ALL the things like email, network printers, mapped drives, etc… and putting data back into the retrospective directory.

I worked on all this, while maintaining IT stability in the office 6 hours Friday, nothing during the weekend, 8 hours Monday and 8 Hours Tuesday

Back to the server, I had been informed of AV alerts a day ago and briefly confirmed a possible heuristic threat that wanted to get sent to the AV company for research. When I clicked on Internet Explorer with the lack of association icon, of course nothing happened. I then followed the path and directory etc of where it was pointing to and saw a file called mso.sss and right away, knew I had found something that may explain my server not being able to shutdown without ending several instances of RUNDLL32.EXE. I went back to the machine that had the possible threat indication earlier, and searched well known virus locations, and bingo, hidden in a folder in the APPDATA directory was mso.sss. so now I realize I am dealing with a worm that is spreading thru the network. I google the file to find only 4 or 5 links to information, and soon learn that its new, rare and severe. So now I am dealing with recreating a server environment, and fighting a worm that is spreading thru the network.

The point of my email is this, ever since Monday morning, I am getting a lot of heat and asked as to why this is not fixed??? Management is well aware that I did not do anything over the weekend, but I feel like my expertise is being criticized because 7 hours into this, I am being asked constantly why this is not operational as well as a precise ETA of when it will be fully operational. Due to the lack of 100 percent knowledge on the 3rd party ERP system and that it is dynamically updating numbers on another server and everything else that is going on, I feel like they should be more proud of the status of everything. I understand the frustrations of downed systems, I am NO stranger to that, but with me being the only one in a company of around 4 servers and 12 computers, I think I am on track or even ahead of the game. I really believe that they have no idea what entails in IT and I am looking for comments to share with them from the community, what do you think?? Comments?

Might I add that a better backup system with a disaster recovery plan other than just copied data to removable drives, and a VM environment to allow replications and snapshots has been proposed weeks after I started, but shot down due to cost.

Thank you…….
Matt
May 9, 2012 3:47:55 PM

I feel for you Matt. I work in a mid sized company of about 200 employees and unfortunately the IT dept which consists of myself and 2 others go through a lot of the same scrutiny. Hopefully this lightens your mood.

WHAT EVERY IT GUY GOES THROUGH

I've actually been using the cars analogy for a couple months now and I think it's very fitting. Imagine if you were a mechanic who owned an auto shop and your average customer call went something like this:
Customer: My car isn't working and I need you to fix it immediately, this is an emergency
Mechanic: Alright sir what seems to be the problem?
Customer: I don't know, I tried to use my car on friday and it didn't work, now it's monday and I need to get to work and I can't and this needs to be fixed right now.
Mechanic: Can you start the car? Can you even get into your car? Does it make any sounds when you try to start it? Are all 4 tires there?
Customer: I don't know, I don't know what any of that stuff means, I tried to get to work and it wouldn't let me and you need to fix it now because you changed my oil 6 months ago.
Mechanic: Alright well what kind of car are you driving?
Customer: I don't know, a green one, why does that matter?
Mechanic: Please take a look at the back of your car and see if there are any letters or numbers that would indicate a vehicle model or manufacturer
Customer: Ok, my car is a SV2 87K.
Mechanic: No sir that's your license plate. My records indicate that you drive a Nissan Altima, can you confirm that the key you're using to try and get into this car says Nissan on it?
Customer: My key says Lexus but I don't see how that makes a difference, I've been using this key on this car for years and it's always worked, what did you do to my car?

May 9, 2012 3:52:33 PM

Nice..... I love it, I am printing that out because that is so right....
Thank you so much for the comment!

"Ok, my car is a SV2 87K" - priceless!
Related resources
May 9, 2012 4:31:09 PM

If I was your employer I would also be questioning this. Though I commend you on your efforts I think you have failed the business you are being paid by to support.

My first question would be why was the server not completely up and running at the very least by Monday morning? This should had been done the same day of the crash and at worse over the weekend. IT is not an 8-5 job and if it is company critical you work until it is done.

My second question to you would be why was there no redundancy on the server drives to begin with? At minimum you should be running mirrored drives. Especially on machines that are core to the business. At best you have a good RAID and external backup system.

Lastly, I would ask why YOU were dealing with a physically failed drive? Though what you did allowed you to get the data, you should have shipped this off to a professional service to have it recovered the day you got it if that data is that important. (Geek squad is not that service) You playing with a drive in that state as you did is more likely going to cause issues even a professional service can't help you with. You should have been using that time to get the servers/network fully functional again and consider yourself lucky on the recovery.

Good luck!

May 9, 2012 4:45:03 PM

I would agree with Skippy27. Leverage this as a learning opportunity. When the virtualization approach was shot down due to cost you could have had an alternative that is low cost in your back pocket to follow up.

Purchasing a couple of extra drives and a backup system would have helped significantly. Mirror the server drives (or better yet, mirror for the OS and RAID 5 for the data/app).

Also I would never, as a company, walk in to Best Buy to get data recovery support. They are the middleman for Ontrack data recovery services. You would have better results going with Ontrack directly. Then you could have spent your time focussed on the server, instead of risking complete and total loss of the laptop data. You got very lucky on that one.

Oh, and VMware snapshots are NOT production backups! Just sayin' cuz I have seen way too many people think that they are:

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?l...





May 9, 2012 4:48:40 PM

Skippy27 said:
If I was your employer I would also be questioning this. Though I commend you on your efforts I think you have failed the business you are being paid by to support.

My first question would be why was the server not completely up and running at the very least by Monday morning? This should had been done the same day of the crash and at worse over the weekend. IT is not an 8-5 job and if it is company critical you work until it is done.

My second question to you would be why was there no redundancy on the server drives to begin with? At minimum you should be running mirrored drives. Especially on machines that are core to the business. At best you have a good RAID and external backup system.

Lastly, I would ask why YOU were dealing with a physically failed drive? Though what you did allowed you to get the data, you should have shipped this off to a professional service to have it recovered the day you got it if that data is that important. (Geek squad is not that service) You playing with a drive in that state as you did is more likely going to cause issues even a professional service can't help you with. You should have been using that time to get the servers/network fully functional again and consider yourself lucky on the recovery.

Good luck!



Thank you for your post!
I do not have a key to the building, and I had asked around for someone to meet me here and let me in the building, or a key, including my boss who is giving me heat. So I was unable to get into the building. I am VERY familiar with IT not being 8-5.

Secondly, I took over where a former IT person was let go, the server that had no RAID was his artwork. Since then I have been able to get the money to build a new server that had several points of redundancy, including a RAID 1 OS Array and a RAID 5 data array. I was in the process of moving every server task into this server.

Thirdly, in this company, it is VERY difficult to get approval for anything financially related, in fact the day before this happened a person in sales was rejected a request for $10.00 cardstock to make coupons for an exhibit we were displaying at a show.
When I first started I proposed a C200 by Ctera to create user snapshots for backup, this was shot down, as well as a Cisco RV042 to create redundancy across dual ISP's -Basically, its like pulling teeth to get any sort of approval for needed items. I usually run out of space on the old servers, and have to clean them out because I have not gotten approval for new drives for those machines.

The end user took it to Geek Squad, and was not approved any money for recovery services.

I know there is alot of information left out, but it was not a surprise to me that if something did go down, that there was no simple recovery option, and that was well explained to those in charge.

Thank you!
May 9, 2012 5:14:02 PM

po1nted said:
I would agree with Skippy27. Leverage this as a learning opportunity. When the virtualization approach was shot down due to cost you could have had an alternative that is low cost in your back pocket to follow up.

Purchasing a couple of extra drives and a backup system would have helped significantly. Mirror the server drives (or better yet, mirror for the OS and RAID 5 for the data/app).

Also I would never, as a company, walk in to Best Buy to get data recovery support. They are the middleman for Ontrack data recovery services. You would have better results going with Ontrack directly. Then you could have spent your time focussed on the server, instead of risking complete and total loss of the laptop data. You got very lucky on that one.

Oh, and VMware snapshots are NOT production backups! Just sayin' cuz I have seen way too many people think that they are:

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?l...




Thank you. I am starting to think there is just to much information left out to get an accurate depiction of what has happened here. This company is one of the MANY company's I have administrated/consulted etc, and the absolute worst when it comes to trying to convey importance, or to have confidence that what I say/recommend is being taken seriously. This is not an American company, and there is somewhat of a language barrier involved, as well as a headquarter that accesses the servers and never notes any changes what-so-ever. They will not move out of 2003 server EVEN though the server has 32 GB RAM but the 2003 non-enterprise only see's 4GB that's it, and NO to different software

That was one purpose of VMware, to install 2008 Server on the equipment I have and run VMWARE player, yes... PLAYER to show them that we can run 2003 server in a 2008 environment to take advantage of the available memory, and also to get everything into one redundant device.

when I first started there were an ENORMOUS amount of security holes, DMZ devices, no AV/Firewall etc, and their ERP program was constantly being changed, such as customer names descriptions etc to inappropriate things, and I have documented evidence of this, but my purpose for snapshots was to revert changes when they happen, while tightening down security. Once everything was setup, I was looking at any sort of VMware Consolidated Backup (will probably have to be opensource/freeware, due to costs)

May 9, 2012 6:03:15 PM

If the executive team is that focused on cost, I would ask them to determine how much is lost when the mission-critical business systems are non-operational for x hours or days. Remind them that HDDs, MBs, PSUs, NICs, and other components all eventually fail, some more frequently than others. And when this stuff fails, it sometimes isn't even possible to find an exact replacement for some parts, depending on the age. That's why VMs (which use consistent, virtual parts), backups (which protect against both unintentional and malicious internal and external activities) and component redundancy (which keeps you operational and reduces down-time) are so critical.

As for data security, tell them that you are concerned about the fact that the average cost per record for exposed personal data (their customers' data...) is often over $1000 EACH when you account for legal fees, loss of business, loss of customer goodwill, and market perception. So since your environment is already susceptible to viruses, your customers' records are no better than being "in-the-clear" and published on the internet. Depending on the business, the liability there alone could be enough to shut you guys down permanently.

You sound frustrated beyond belief. If I were you, I'd probably be polishing my resume. Any company that has this many issues in IT direction alone undoubtedly has other similar problems in other areas.
- HR: Are they illegally discriminating with regard to positions and/or compensation? Are they documenting candidate and termination interviews appropriately? Are they asking employees to sign employment contracts with illegal terms?
- Sales/Marketing: Are they making unsupportable statements about products? Are they engaging in illegal activities such as bribes, side letters, kickbacks?
- Finance: Are they reporting income appropriately and based on legal accounting standards? Are all employee income withholdings being paid to IRS promptly and completely? Are retirement plan contributions being paid promptly?

Jump ship before the captain drives it into an iceberg.
May 9, 2012 7:03:17 PM


I have great sympathy with the OP.
It may be hard to believe or understand, for some, that there are companies that do behave in this way.........than an 'ideal' systems management does not, in fact operate/apply to all scenarios. Unfortunately, as has just been described so well, this does indeed happen - perhaps more frequently than some may realise!

And, of course, there are many reasons for this - I always find management ignorance laughable - and certainly inexcusable when it comes to basic IT routine maintenance tasks (OS/DATA backups).

Jobs are hard to find and when we get one, we all have to perform a 'balancing act' with management/those with the 'power' to enforce changes - an act whose outcome may very well be pre-loaded in a great number of situations! - there are many situations where we simply cannot get our message through - until something like this occurs!

So a little more understanding with the OP's situation, please.

p.s. Unoriginal1 - great reply!
May 9, 2012 7:54:58 PM

I've worked for a company as an IT Intern and believe me the ways they ran things boggled my mind how their systems stayed afloat. First they had a server room that would leak water in when it rained which is why they had water pails in a server room!!! out of all places lol.

Then they draped cat5e cords from the ceiling in the warehouse all the way dangling to the computer which was well over the maximum recommended cable length and people complained when their internet was flaky haha.

When they upgraded to a new system right before I left they ran into so many problems that the server was literally unavailable for 3 days and people had to work in the dark so to speak.

I am just amazed that CEO's and shareholders think that IT is something that is super easy super cheap and only takes one to maintain. People need to understand that if they want something to work properly its going to cost one of three things: Money, Time, or extra help.
May 9, 2012 8:00:44 PM

TeraMedia said:
If the executive team is that focused on cost, I would ask them to determine how much is lost when the mission-critical business systems are non-operational for x hours or days. Remind them that HDDs, MBs, PSUs, NICs, and other components all eventually fail, some more frequently than others. And when this stuff fails, it sometimes isn't even possible to find an exact replacement for some parts, depending on the age. That's why VMs (which use consistent, virtual parts), backups (which protect against both unintentional and malicious internal and external activities) and component redundancy (which keeps you operational and reduces down-time) are so critical.

As for data security, tell them that you are concerned about the fact that the average cost per record for exposed personal data (their customers' data...) is often over $1000 EACH when you account for legal fees, loss of business, loss of customer goodwill, and market perception. So since your environment is already susceptible to viruses, your customers' records are no better than being "in-the-clear" and published on the internet. Depending on the business, the liability there alone could be enough to shut you guys down permanently.

You sound frustrated beyond belief. If I were you, I'd probably be polishing my resume. Any company that has this many issues in IT direction alone undoubtedly has other similar problems in other areas.
- HR: Are they illegally discriminating with regard to positions and/or compensation? Are they documenting candidate and termination interviews appropriately? Are they asking employees to sign employment contracts with illegal terms?
- Sales/Marketing: Are they making unsupportable statements about products? Are they engaging in illegal activities such as bribes, side letters, kickbacks?
- Finance: Are they reporting income appropriately and based on legal accounting standards? Are all employee income withholdings being paid to IRS promptly and completely? Are retirement plan contributions being paid promptly?

Jump ship before the captain drives it into an iceberg.



This company consists of about 9 people, no HR... in fact, I was forced to take the job due to some missed Child Support payments. When I started, I was shown my cubicle, and that was it, it took me several months to realize we had a break *cubicle*. The company has NO benefits, actually, no employee handbook. I filled out a generic application, that's it. My background is in Long Term Care/Health and I am very knowledgeable in regards to HIPAA and the responsibilities needed for data/data protection, in fact, I have performed several miracles, including the restoration of a corrupt Quickbooks database after Intuit said it was unrecoverable(and yes I am familiar with tech support being very quick to write the problem off as unresolvable)

I am definatly looking for other opportunity's and have deemed little future/challenges here in the very beginning, but the purpose of my post this morning was simply to show these people here that, if you ignore the IT guy, and/or don't want to budget for needed equipment, then DON'T expect problems to be solved quickly. I should have paid more attention to the details of my post, but I was so frustrated ;)  - I just get sick sometimes of the way all of us IT guys can get treated when we cannot perform miracles.... You know it always seems like when you do create a miracle and make something work that shouldn't the expectation of what you can do significantly rises and the expectations become that of every time something bad happens and you cannot get it working, you failed. For example, when I got the end users drive up and recovered data, this was looked at as "well if you got that going, you should be able to get the other one working" rather than "Wow, great job going out of your way to get this data restored, in lieu of all the other disasters going on!! and hopefully you are able to get progress on the other drive that is in a dangerous situation as well." etc etc.
In order to be a successful IT professional, it does really require large amounts of dedication to do what we do, and the reason I think most of us work all hours, read about everything, find creative ways to solutions etc, is because we all really love what we do, and really try our hardest to make everything perfect, so that others do NOT have to have a day similar to what we we go through EVERYDAY!

As a little note, when I replaced a router here in the past that required a complete IP address scope change, I was asked why it would take longer than a few minutes, as switching routers should only require unplugging the old one and plugging in the new one???

Thanks for the post!
May 9, 2012 8:05:33 PM

mightymaxio said:
I've worked for a company as an IT Intern and believe me the ways they ran things boggled my mind how their systems stayed afloat. First they had a server room that would leak water in when it rained which is why they had water pails in a server room!!! out of all places lol.

Then they draped cat5e cords from the ceiling in the warehouse all the way dangling to the computer which was well over the maximum recommended cable length and people complained when their internet was flaky haha.

When they upgraded to a new system right before I left they ran into so many problems that the server was literally unavailable for 3 days and people had to work in the dark so to speak.

I am just amazed that CEO's and shareholders think that IT is something that is super easy super cheap and only takes one to maintain. People need to understand that if they want something to work properly its going to cost one of three things: Money, Time, or extra help.


Excellent post!
yea, who cares about cable attenuation, you know anyone can cable....

Our servers sit in the corner of the moisture and temperature changing warehouse.... we recently were able to get a Dell cage for the equipment, but that was because it was $10.00 on an auction.... great cage though!
May 9, 2012 9:23:27 PM

This is the small company mentality. No one realizes how heavily they rely on computer systems for the job to function and often management doesn't want to put money into IT... they do not see an immediate ROI. In fact, everyone uses it and therefore that is the ROI. No down time is significant and pays for itself easily.

I've been in your position previously. My company had just acquired a smaller firm and I was tasked with running IT there for a couple weeks until I could remotely manage everything. The server died on day 3. They refused to purchase a new server previously.
Since then, IT investment has gone up but often they need to take the lumps to understand how critical IT is for a company.

A one person IT shop can be difficult because everyone comes to you. Many people, including some of the people replying, do not really understand how many different hats you wear along with not having an endless budget in a small company. You can only do so much with the tools and equipment provided.

That being said, it would be ideal for you to get the systems restored as soon as possible. Again, you can only do so much and calling in for support will likely result in a big bill, but it appears to be needed.

At this time there isn't much you can do. As we say in this field, this is where you earn your paycheck.

Once this is resolved, you need to sit down and write up a list of "Needs" in order to prevent this. Antivirus, additional hardware, a backup solution, etc. Whatever fits your needs. It doesn't need to be implemented over night, but maybe phased in over the next fiscal year or two.

As far as your skillset, when something goes wrong everyone will blame you. That's fine, none of them have any idea of how to fix it the problem. Pointing fingers is always the easy way out.

The one thing that I would point out in many IT places: If a server is down or in a disaster recovery situation, you never leave until you get it resolved. You had an entire weekend to work on it unhindered. Granted, you said you tried. Personally, I would have been calling up the chain until I got to the owner asking him to let you in to do your job. No one likes working the weekends. Unfortunately, the weekends are an IT person's best friend when it comes to getting the job done.

Good luck, hope you get the issues worked out. Don't press for new equipment or solutions right away. I'd sit on it and let the stress of being down settle and people get back into the groove. After that bring up a solution to start remediating your issues.
May 9, 2012 10:21:14 PM

Hi :) 

I feel for you...

A few years ago, I was called in to a Company very similar to yours (Technically illiterate and very very tight with money)

Two servers had crashed (OUT OF THREE) and they had sacked their ONE IT guy....

They thought I could just "pop in" << their exact words..and get them going again....

I said I would have a quick look for free (1 hour max) and then I would charge a rate per hour that made them gasp...

They agreed one days labour maximum...

I gave them the free hour ,then 3 chargeable hours, then called all the Directors to a meeting....

Here is what I told them..

The guy they sacked had saved them tens of thousands and I was totally amazed that their CRAP equipment had lasted as long as it had....and that was ONLY due to that guys dedication...

He had even helped me during my check over the phone.....

They asked what they should do....they were in hysterics over data loss etc...

I told them to give the guy his job back PLUS A £5000 bonus to get him back and LISTEN to what he needed to buy...

I also told them I would quite happily replace their system for them at a cost of around £100,000 plus...

I had no intention of doing so but it was nice to see their faces...lol

So....they finally realised what an underpaid asset they had (and that they had taken advantage of)

So they paid him the £5000 to get him back and he fixed it all for them...some of the new kit he bought from my company, but that wasnt the point for me....it was teaching them to appreciate what they had in this really hard working guy....

To the OP ..tell them what it will COST them IF you walk.....then walk if needed.....you REALLY dont need the stress...

All the best Brett :) 
May 10, 2012 3:05:17 PM

Big fishing there. :) 

I'd would agree though that if they continue your work environment without providing adequate equipment and funding, I would start looking at other jobs. Finding a replacement, especially in a one man shop is extremely difficult.
May 17, 2012 1:34:10 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

I feel for you...

A few years ago, I was called in to a Company very similar to yours (Technically illiterate and very very tight with money)

Two servers had crashed (OUT OF THREE) and they had sacked their ONE IT guy....

They thought I could just "pop in" << their exact words..and get them going again....

I said I would have a quick look for free (1 hour max) and then I would charge a rate per hour that made them gasp...

They agreed one days labour maximum...

I gave them the free hour ,then 3 chargeable hours, then called all the Directors to a meeting....

Here is what I told them..

The guy they sacked had saved them tens of thousands and I was totally amazed that their CRAP equipment had lasted as long as it had....and that was ONLY due to that guys dedication...

He had even helped me during my check over the phone.....

They asked what they should do....they were in hysterics over data loss etc...

I told them to give the guy his job back PLUS A £5000 bonus to get him back and LISTEN to what he needed to buy...

I also told them I would quite happily replace their system for them at a cost of around £100,000 plus...

I had no intention of doing so but it was nice to see their faces...lol

So....they finally realised what an underpaid asset they had (and that they had taken advantage of)

So they paid him the £5000 to get him back and he fixed it all for them...some of the new kit he bought from my company, but that wasnt the point for me....it was teaching them to appreciate what they had in this really hard working guy....

To the OP ..tell them what it will COST them IF you walk.....then walk if needed.....you REALLY dont need the stress...

All the best Brett :) 


_______________________________________________________________

This is one of the best story I hear lately, Brett excellent job
June 21, 2012 1:06:04 AM

Zellco said:
_______________________________________________________________

This is one of the best story I hear lately, Brett excellent job


Hi :) 

I am sort of famous locally for my ....hmmm how shall I put this.... brutal honesty...

But my companies have more work than we can handle anyway, so I can pick and choose my business jobs as to be honest you meet so many idiots in business companies its not really worth the hassle, and my retail computer shops and laptop repair company in comparison are much easier to make a profit on....

The weird thing though is that the more brutal you are with them the more they actually want us to do the jobs....a lot of which I turn down...lol

But its much more difficult in the OPs position, but as I said, he REALLY does not need the hassle as he sounds good enough to get a good job anywhere, where he will be appreciated....so "walking" is always a sensible option to consider...

All the best Brett :) 


July 2, 2012 8:10:21 PM

I have left jobs for this reason, though I feel your pain if you are stuck in one. I remember one client of mine back in the day, I managed to convince them that their Windows 2000 Server running on a Pentium III era Xeon server with a spanned (JBOD) SCSI array was less than stable, this was in 2008, and the company had over 300 employees at the time across three sites linked with T1s, and this was the only server, the only domain controller... Finally after months and months of presentations and case studies and meetings with the executives we finally convinced them to buy one of the Intel modular servers with two dual processor blades for redundancy, RAID6 SAN, redundant power and switches, generator and UPS backup... the works. After a short bit we had the system ready to install and did a site survey of the server closet... and look, there is a nice sprinkler head directly over the server rack... I talked to them about CO2/Halon and they freaked out about the $15k costs. I told them to imagine, one day down without their servers would be $20-30k lost in revenue... not to mention $20k+ to replace the computers themselves... and this is a resort, where fires and smoke alarms happen frequently due to idiot guests.

Finally, they put the server rack on 4x4s and built a shed roof over it.

Anywho... crappy story, but I 100% feel your pain. 120% sometimes.
July 24, 2012 2:46:01 AM

Quit i start your own IT related Company
!