YAAD or maybe YASD but I didn't know

Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.nethack (More info?)

Started once again an elven wizardess and lo and behold she had ring of
free action in her starting inventory. Quickly put it on thinking that
that's one ring I'm never going to take off and I didn't.

On dungeon level 2 she found a locked chest and further on a hobbit that
wielded a dageer in plain sight of her. Dispatching the hobbit she
proptly took the dagger and backtracked to the chest. Opening the chest
with that dagger was piece of cake and soon she was proud owner of three
new spellbooks.

Having no fear of paralyzation, because of the ring of free action, she
started to read the first tome. It must have been cursed as no warning
on difficulty was given but she was teleported and paralyzed.

Before her familiar Monday could get to her aid she was killed by
jackal. And the spellbook was cursed.

How come she was paralyzed even though she wore a ring of free action?

Topi
--
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are
always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts."
- Bertrand Russell
"How come he didn't put 'I think' at the end of it?" - Anonymous
6 answers Last reply
More about yaad yasd didn know
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.nethack (More info?)

    Topi Linkala wrote:

    > Having no fear of paralyzation, because of the ring of free action,
    > she started to read the first tome. It must have been cursed as no
    > warning on difficulty was given but she was teleported and paralyzed.

    > How come she was paralyzed even though she wore a ring of free action?

    Because the ring of free action does not protect from this of
    paralysation?

    From rint-343.txt:

    free action
    acquired by
    Wearing a ring of free action. (Not eating; that confers sleep
    resistance.)
    effects
    Protects against paralysis attacks of gelatinous cubes, guardian
    nagas, ghouls, shades and Yeenoghu.
    Protects against passive paralysis attacks of gelatinous cubes and
    floating eyes.
    Paralysis and stunning spells cast by monsters have their effect
    reduced to one turn.
    Protects against quaffed or thrown potions of paralysis or sleeping.
    Protects against paralysis effect of chest traps.
    Protects against self-paralysis from looking into a mirror as a
    floating eye.

    By the way, I think this is an oversight. Since it protects from other
    types of traps, I think it should also protect from this one.

    --
    Boudewijn.

    --
    "I have hundreds of other quotes, just waiting to replace this one
    as my signature..." - Me
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.nethack (More info?)

    Boudewijn Waijers wrote:

    > Topi Linkala wrote:
    >
    >>Having no fear of paralyzation, because of the ring of free action,
    >>she started to read the first tome. It must have been cursed as no
    >>warning on difficulty was given but she was teleported and paralyzed.
    >
    >>How come she was paralyzed even though she wore a ring of free action?
    >
    > Because the ring of free action does not protect from this of
    > paralysation?

    I know. Not by reading the spoilers but by that it happened to one of my
    characters ;-)

    > By the way, I think this is an oversight. Since it protects from other
    > types of traps, I think it should also protect from this one.

    This was what I meant with my question. How come it doesn't when it does
    for everything else.

    Topi

    P.S. Even though I'm a source diver and totally spoiled I cannot
    remember all the details all the time.

    same
    --
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are
    always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts."
    - Bertrand Russell
    "How come he didn't put 'I think' at the end of it?" - Anonymous
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.nethack (More info?)

    Topi Linkala wrote:
    > Boudewijn Waijers wrote:

    >> By the way, I think this is an oversight. Since it protects from
    >> other types of traps, I think it should also protect from this one.

    > This was what I meant with my question. How come it doesn't when it
    > does for everything else.

    Actually, Dylan pointed out to me that it does not protect from every
    other type of paralysation. To paraphrase him:

    "For example, the immobility from reading a cursed spellbook seems
    similar to the trance while looking into a crystal ball. It's
    absorption in the item being used, rather than paralysis imposed from
    without."


    --
    Boudewijn.

    --
    "I have hundreds of other quotes, just waiting to replace this one
    as my signature..." - Me
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.nethack (More info?)

    Topi Linkala wrote:
    > Boudewijn Waijers wrote:
    >
    > > Topi Linkala wrote:

    > > By the way, I think this is an oversight. Since it protects from other
    > > types of traps, I think it should also protect from this one.
    >
    > This was what I meant with my question. How come it doesn't when it does
    > for everything else.

    I think the game is designed so that everything has some exception. It
    is designed this way to cause more people to YASD. This is like when
    people YASD from a green slime attack because they were relying on
    their unicorn horn to cure all their status ailments.

    Maybe it is an oversight, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's working
    as intended.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.nethack (More info?)

    Topi Linkala <nes@iki.fi> writes:

    > Having no fear of paralyzation, because of the ring of free action,
    > she started to read the first tome. It must have been cursed as no
    > warning on difficulty was given but she was teleported and paralyzed.

    Looks unintended to my untrained eyes. Of course, one could
    rationalize that she was not paralyzed by physical but by
    mental influence, but then again, that would be my assumption
    about paralyzation spells or floating eyes, too. Hence I can't
    see a good reason why =oFA protects against one form and not
    against the other.

    Best,
    Jakob
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.roguelike.nethack (More info?)

    Jakob Creutzig wrote:

    > Topi Linkala <nes@iki.fi> writes:
    >
    >> Having no fear of paralyzation, because of the ring of free action,
    >> she started to read the first tome. It must have been cursed as no
    >> warning on difficulty was given but she was teleported and paralyzed.
    >
    > Looks unintended to my untrained eyes. Of course, one could
    > rationalize that she was not paralyzed by physical but by
    > mental influence, but then again, that would be my assumption
    > about paralyzation spells or floating eyes, too. Hence I can't
    > see a good reason why =oFA protects against one form and not
    > against the other.

    Paralyzation due to reading from spellbooks is fundamentally different from
    external attacks such as a floating eye. The very act of internalizing the
    essence of a spell requires dangerous alterations of brain structure, which
    if not done absolutely perfectly, run the risk of putting the reader's brain
    into a temporarily looping state, which it can take some time to break out
    of. Visual and other sensory input to the character is not lost, but is
    buffered in a non-looping center of neural processing, and when the rest of
    the mind breaks out of the loop, the buffer is passed in almost
    instantaneously, but with the characters temporal processing functions
    sped up accordingly.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    A small, but vocal, contingent even argues that tin is superior, but they
    are held by most to be the lunatic fringe of Foil Deflector Beanie science.
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