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Iron Lore

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Anonymous
March 21, 2005 12:41:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Monte Cook's company Malhavoc Press has recently announced their second "variant
Player's Handbook" - Iron Lore, written by Mike Mearls.

http://www.montecook.com/cgi-bin/page.cgi?iron-lore

The basic premise is not a "low-magic" game but a "scarce magic" game; the idea
is that Iron Lore characters do with feats and skills what normal D&D characters
must rely on magic spells and items to accomplish. Mike Mearls has stated that
he wrote Iron Lore specifically to be compatible with regular D&D virtually "out
of the box" - this includes facing supernatural challenges like dragons, demons,
and undead without the need for magic. Magic itself still exists but is a force
both dangerous and unpredictable; one of the ten base classes presented in Iron
Lore, the arcanist, is as much of a master of this force as any mere human can
be.

I did mean "human" - instead of fantasy races, Iron Lore presents a trait system
where being a tall, lean warrior from the frozen steppes actually mechanically
distinguishes your character from the stocky plainsman or the lithe urban street
rat.

Iron Lore uses hit points, saving throws, all the normal elements of D&D, but
tweaks them for its purposes - it presents a different saving throw progression,
eliminates the need for magical healing, and so on.

The website has a FAQ and other information, as well as a downloadable brochure
explaining the concepts and advertising the products in the range. Here are the
class descriptions from that brochure as a teaser:

ARCANIST: The arcanist dances the fine line between arcane might and oblivion.
Luck plays as much a role as skill in his spells, yet his knowledge of magic
gives him an important weapon in battle. Even without his spells, his keen mind
and extensive lore allow him to outthink his foes.

ARCHER: Drawing on speed, agility, and a lethal accuracy, the archer is an
unmatched
sniper. His shots strike with frightening accuracy. When a foe draws too close,
he
calls upon his agility and training to dance away from trouble.

ARMIGER: The armiger proves the saying that he who strikes last lands the
killing blow. His impenetrable armor and careful patience allow him to wear down
an opponent slowly. When his foe has spent his strength, the armiger finishes
him off.

BERSERKER: While other warriors rely on planning and tactics, the berserker
unleashes his inner rage to smash his foes into a bloody pulp. The berserker
doesn't have time to feel pain or halt his assault. The raw power of his savage,
bloodthirsty nature carries him forward.

EXECUTIONER: If fighting could be called an elegant art, the executioner is its
greatest master. His vicious cuts seek out tendons, arteries, and joints,
rendering as much damage with a single blow as a berserker inflicts in a dozen
hacks.

HARRIER: The harrier demonstrates that the more attacks you make, the more
damage you can inflict. The fastest and most mobile of all characters, he swoops
in to strike a flurry of blows from an unexpected direction. None can match his
mobility.

HUNTER: Brute force is worthless if it lacks intelligent direction. The hunter
uses his mind to overcome his enemies. His tactics are unmatched, while his
knowledge of poisons, lore, and strategy makes him a master at planning ambushes
or tracking down a hidden foe.

MAN-AT-ARMS: The man-at-arms is a martial omnivore. He learns a little bit of
each class' tactics. While he might not excel in any one area, he learns enough
to survive almost any situation. With bow, blade, heavy armor, or a clever
stratagem, he adapts his talents to match his foe's weakness.

THIEF: A trickster who can defeat you with his crafty words and sharp mind, the
thief uses his personality and low cunning to defeat his foes. He looks harmless
enough to ignore in favor of more daunting targets, but he's ready to backstab
anyone who loses track of him.

WEAPON MASTER: The weapon master is a study in the relentless quest for
perfection. When he bears his chosen armament, few can stand against him.
Whether he favors a fighting staff, a brace of daggers, or a keenly forged
sword, he is the best at what he does.

If what Mearls says about its compatibility with standard D&D resources is true,
I'm really looking forward to this. It would be nice to have an alternative to
the D&D magic item system which, as Mearls points out, is really (from a system
perspective) just a point-buy "additional powers" system nailed on to D&D's
class/feat/skill base.

--
Christopher Adams - Sydney, Australia
What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you
understand?
http://www.users.bigpond.net.au/mhacdebhandia/prestigec...
http://www.users.bigpond.net.au/mhacdebhandia/templatel...

Quo usque tandem abutere, Vepre, patientia nostra?

More about : iron lore

Anonymous
March 21, 2005 2:27:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

My usual question for variant setting / rules collections like this is:
how does this play out in an established setting. Do you need to tone
your magic down in order to take advantage of it, or can you take a
standard D&D setting like Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms or Eberron and
easily incorporate elements from this book without breaking your game's
balance?
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 8:18:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

"Christopher Adams" <mhacdebhandia@yahoo.invalid> wrote in message
news:X5m%d.5205$C7.601@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> Monte Cook's company Malhavoc Press has recently announced their second
> "variant Player's Handbook" - Iron Lore, written by Mike Mearls.
>
> http://www.montecook.com/cgi-bin/page.cgi?iron-lore
>
> The basic premise is not a "low-magic" game but a "scarce magic" game; the
> idea is that Iron Lore characters do with feats and skills what normal D&D
> characters must rely on magic spells and items to accomplish. Mike Mearls
> has stated that he wrote Iron Lore specifically to be compatible with
> regular D&D virtually "out of the box" - this includes facing supernatural
> challenges like dragons, demons, and undead without the need for magic.
> Magic itself still exists but is a force both dangerous and unpredictable;
> one of the ten base classes presented in Iron Lore, the arcanist, is as
> much of a master of this force as any mere human can be.

Sounds interesting.

--
^v^v^Malachias Invictus^v^v^

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishment the scroll,
I am the Master of my fate:
I am the Captain of my soul.

from _Invictus_, by William Ernest Henley
Related resources
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 9:16:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Mere moments before death, ajs@ajs.com hastily scrawled:
>My usual question for variant setting / rules collections like this is:
>how does this play out in an established setting. Do you need to tone
>your magic down in order to take advantage of it, or can you take a
>standard D&D setting like Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms or Eberron and
>easily incorporate elements from this book without breaking your game's
>balance?

What a silly question.



Ed Chauvin IV

--
DISCLAIMER : WARNING: RULE # 196 is X-rated in that to calculate L,
use X = [(C2/10)^2], and RULE # 193 which is NOT meant to be read by
kids, since RULE # 187 EXPLAINS homosexuality mathematically, using
modifier G @ 11.

"I always feel left out when someone *else* gets killfiled."
--Terry Austin
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 2:23:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

mhacdebhandia@yahoo.invalid wrote:

> Monte Cook's company Malhavoc Press has recently announced their second "variant
> Player's Handbook" - Iron Lore, written by Mike Mearls.
>
> [...]
>
> If what Mearls says about its compatibility with standard D&D resources is true,
> I'm really looking forward to this. It would be nice to have an alternative to
> the D&D magic item system which, as Mearls points out, is really (from a system
> perspective) just a point-buy "additional powers" system nailed on to D&D's
> class/feat/skill base.

I don't have anything constructive to add, not having much to go on...
but from what I've seen: me too.


--
Jasin Zujovic
jzujovic@inet.hr
!