Ticks

Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
keeping them off..

I'd rather keep them off me than have to keep pulling them out of my
skin afterwards!

From Robbie
15 answers Last reply
More about ticks
  1. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    In news:vrdfc0p3it7jo295g52111b9v37ocl6ioj@4ax.com hungryrob
    <hungryrob@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
    > keeping them off..

    Over here, there are a number of permethrin-based repellents which you
    spray on your clothing. I don't suppose US brand names would be of much
    use, but the stuff we use is called Permanone.

    Some vendors of outdoor gear are now selling pre-treated clothing.

    --
    Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN bert@visi.com
  2. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    hungryrob <hungryrob@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:vrdfc0p3it7jo295g52111b9v37ocl6ioj@4ax.com:

    > Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
    > keeping them off..
    >
    > I'd rather keep them off me than have to keep pulling them out of my
    > skin afterwards!
    >
    > From Robbie

    Ticks are becoming an increased problem and if you have been bitten make
    sure you understand and know the signs of Lymes disease.
    The best repellent I’ve used is the ex-army arthropod cream.
    This stuff will keep blow fly’s off you in a pigeon hide in the middle
    of harvest time and keep ticks at bay.

    John
  3. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    >Subject: Re: Ticks
    >From: John Stalking*@britishlibrary.net
    >Date: 10/06/2004 08:29 GMT

    >Ticks are becoming an increased problem and if you have been bitten make
    >sure you understand and know the signs of Lymes disease.<snip>

    There was an interesting article in a recent Shooting Times on that very
    subject. Do take care when dealing with the nasty little buggers - don't bother
    asking me how I know.

    Steve. Suffolk.
    remove 'knujon' to e-mail
  4. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    The message <vrdfc0p3it7jo295g52111b9v37ocl6ioj@4ax.com>
    from hungryrob <hungryrob@hotmail.com> contains these words:

    > Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
    > keeping them off..

    Light, multi-layered clothing is probably the best deterrent, but not
    really practical in the heat of summer. I imagine any readily available
    mossie repellent would go some way toward dissuading them from attaching
    themselves to you.

    It's rather an odd fact, but some people are far more susceptible to
    ticks than others. I have had just three 'in the flesh' in more than
    thirty years here, and this area is really bad for tick. However, I
    friend I used to stalk with would come off the hill just covered with
    them. It was one of the reasons I used to take him with me, to act as a
    sort of tick 'conductor'. Better on him than me, I reckoned!

    > I'd rather keep them off me than have to keep pulling them out of my
    > skin afterwards!

    A dab of iodine or spirit on a cotton bud will normally make them loose
    their grip. If you pull them off be sure to get the head as well, to
    avoid possible infection. And check the bite site regularly for any sign
    of reddening. Inflammation in the guise of a bulls-eye is a sure
    indication of Lyme infection and you should arrange to see your doctor
    immediately. An infection is easily sorted in the early stages using
    antibiotics. But it becomes much more difficult to deal with if left for
    any length of time.

    --
    Kim Sawyer
    Sutherland
    Scotland
  5. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    As ticks breathe through their abdomen:
    margarine, Vaseline, nail varnish, paint, etc.
    Anything that will cause them to suffocate will make them release their grip
    & drop off

    --
    Andy (UK_Rabbiter)
    Creator, Manager & Moderator of Rabbit Hunters
    http://www.smartgroups.com/groups/Rabbit
    http://groups.msn.com/RabbitHunters
    http://s7.invisionfree.com/Rabbit_Hunters
    All mail is scanned by Norton Anti-virus 2004 Pro

    Kim Sawyer wrote:
    > from hungryrob contains these words:
    >
    > > Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
    > > keeping them off..
    >
    > Light, multi-layered clothing is probably the best deterrent, but not
    > really practical in the heat of summer. I imagine any readily available
    > mossie repellent would go some way toward dissuading them from attaching
    > themselves to you.
    >
    > It's rather an odd fact, but some people are far more susceptible to
    > ticks than others. I have had just three 'in the flesh' in more than
    > thirty years here, and this area is really bad for tick. However, I
    > friend I used to stalk with would come off the hill just covered with
    > them. It was one of the reasons I used to take him with me, to act as a
    > sort of tick 'conductor'. Better on him than me, I reckoned!
    >
    > > I'd rather keep them off me than have to keep pulling them out of my
    > > skin afterwards!
    >
    > A dab of iodine or spirit on a cotton bud will normally make them loose
    > their grip. If you pull them off be sure to get the head as well, to
    > avoid possible infection. And check the bite site regularly for any sign
    > of reddening. Inflammation in the guise of a bulls-eye is a sure
    > indication of Lyme infection and you should arrange to see your doctor
    > immediately. An infection is easily sorted in the early stages using
    > antibiotics. But it becomes much more difficult to deal with if left for
    > any length of time.
    >
    > --
    > Kim Sawyer
    > Sutherland
    > Scotland
  6. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 00:16:49 GMT, hungryrob <hungryrob@hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    >snippety snip<
    >Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
    >keeping them off..

    I use a chemical from the vet which does for ticks and requires
    monthly reapplication. It's working well.

    Don't be surprised to discover people using sheepdip to give the dogs
    a periodic drench. Though I haven't done it myself I do know dogs
    which have been treated in this way and are fit and well.

    As for people, don't wander naked through the long grass!

    From Pete

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "Being eaten by a crocodile is just like falling asleep in a blender"
    Bart Simpson
  7. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    The message <m8ahc0tf1gfdi7tj46mcp12vloldkkcimq@4ax.com>
    from Pete <pete.ansbro@virgin.net> contains these words:


    > Don't be surprised to discover people using sheepdip to give the dogs
    > a periodic drench. Though I haven't done it myself I do know dogs
    > which have been treated in this way and are fit and well.

    I had to muzzle my father-in-laws collies as they knew what was coming
    and would rather bite than suffer the indignity of a bath. And no
    wonder; dip in the eyes is bloody sore.

    --
    Kim Sawyer
    Sutherland
    Scotland
  8. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    The message <2irn8lFq8n3hU1@uni-berlin.de>
    from "Andy \(UK_Rabbiter\)" <uk_rabbiterNO_SPAM@yahoo.co.uk> contains
    these words:

    > As ticks breathe through their abdomen:
    > margarine, Vaseline, nail varnish, paint, etc.
    > Anything that will cause them to suffocate will make them release their grip
    > & drop off

    The midges are really bad here just now and I'm using Avon's
    Skin-So-Soft moisturiser spray as a repellent. Works really well.
    However, I draw the line at carrying a bottle of nail varnish as well.
    The locals might start talking...

    --
    Kim Sawyer
    Sutherland
    Scotland
  9. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    an6530@aol.comknujon (AN6530) wrote in
    news:20040610131300.02692.00000729@mb-m28.aol.com:

    >>Subject: Re: Ticks
    >>From: John Stalking*@britishlibrary.net
    >>Date: 10/06/2004 08:29 GMT
    >
    >>Ticks are becoming an increased problem and if you have been bitten
    >>make sure you understand and know the signs of Lymes disease.<snip>
    >
    > There was an interesting article in a recent Shooting Times on that
    > very subject. Do take care when dealing with the nasty little buggers
    > - don't bother asking me how I know.

    Did they give the Lymes “hot-spots” around the country?
    This whole tick/lymes problem isn’t really understood by our GP’s and in
    the majority of cases the GP will sweep it aside. I was told of a chap
    who ended his days, almost senile with many replacement joints after
    what seemed to be a very bad example of arthritis. The problem is that
    the disease hasn’t got any specific patterns and from what I remember it
    can mimic other diseases such as STD’s which inherently makes the
    sufferer reluctant to visit their GP.

    I’ve been told that there is a vaccine for Lymes disease available and
    it’s something I’m going to get done.

    John
  10. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Just carry your usual colour with you Kim, you don't need your whole
    collection ;-)

    Kim Sawyer wrote:
    > The message from Andy (UK_Rabbiter) contains these words:
    >
    > > As ticks breathe through their abdomen:
    > > margarine, Vaseline, nail varnish, paint, etc.
    > > Anything that will cause them to suffocate will make them release their
    grip
    > > & drop off
    >
    > The midges are really bad here just now and I'm using Avon's
    > Skin-So-Soft moisturiser spray as a repellent. Works really well.
    > However, I draw the line at carrying a bottle of nail varnish as well.
    > The locals might start talking...
    >
    > --
    > Kim Sawyer
    > Sutherland
    > Scotland
  11. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    In message <m8ahc0tf1gfdi7tj46mcp12vloldkkcimq@4ax.com>, Pete
    <pete.ansbro@virgin.net> writes
    >On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 00:16:49 GMT, hungryrob <hungryrob@hotmail.com>
    >wrote:
    > >snippety snip<
    >>Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
    >>keeping them off..
    >
    >I use a chemical from the vet which does for ticks and requires
    >monthly reapplication. It's working well.
    >
    >Don't be surprised to discover people using sheepdip to give the dogs
    >a periodic drench. Though I haven't done it myself I do know dogs
    >which have been treated in this way and are fit and well.

    You need to be very wary of taking treatment from one species and giving
    it to another. For example, aspirin are safe for humans, even safer for
    dogs, yet fatal to cats.

    Don't presume that if something is safe on one species it is safe for
    another species. Seek the vet's advice: there's a good reason why the
    veterinary degree requires five years of study.

    --
    --Jonathan Spencer, firearms examiner

    "Whilst Corporal Spencer has all necessary qualifications for
    advancement in the rank, and therefore his name must be placed
    before the Selection Panel for its consideration, it is also
    acknowledged that the likelihood of him being selected for
    promotion is less than slight."
    Official career brief by Royal Air Force Personnel Management Centre, 1982
  12. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 20:48:56 +0100, Kim Sawyer <ksawyer@zetnet.co.uk>
    wrote:

    >The message <m8ahc0tf1gfdi7tj46mcp12vloldkkcimq@4ax.com>
    >from Pete <pete.ansbro@virgin.net> contains these words:
    >
    >
    >> Don't be surprised to discover people using sheepdip to give the dogs
    >> a periodic drench. Though I haven't done it myself I do know dogs
    >> which have been treated in this way and are fit and well.
    >
    >I had to muzzle my father-in-laws collies as they knew what was coming
    >and would rather bite than suffer the indignity of a bath. And no
    >wonder; dip in the eyes is bloody sore.

    We just chucked 'em in when they least suspected it, one minute
    they're dogging the sheep in to the dip, next they're getting a closer
    inspection of the dipper.
    They weren't too impressed generally, but only one recorded bite.

    --
    Mark

    http://www.gunculture.net

    "the subjects... may have arms for their defence"
    English Bill of Rights
  13. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 08:30:01 +0100, Jonathan Spencer
    <jms@NOTMEjonathan-spencer.co.uk> wrote:

    >In message <m8ahc0tf1gfdi7tj46mcp12vloldkkcimq@4ax.com>, Pete
    ><pete.ansbro@virgin.net> writes
    >>On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 00:16:49 GMT, hungryrob <hungryrob@hotmail.com>
    >>wrote:
    >> >snippety snip<
    >>>Anybody know of a spray for repelling ticks? Or some other way of
    >>>keeping them off..
    >>
    >>I use a chemical from the vet which does for ticks and requires
    >>monthly reapplication. It's working well.
    >>
    >>Don't be surprised to discover people using sheepdip to give the dogs
    >>a periodic drench. Though I haven't done it myself I do know dogs
    >>which have been treated in this way and are fit and well.
    >
    >You need to be very wary of taking treatment from one species and giving
    >it to another. For example, aspirin are safe for humans, even safer for
    >dogs, yet fatal to cats.
    >
    >Don't presume that if something is safe on one species it is safe for
    >another species. Seek the vet's advice: there's a good reason why the
    >veterinary degree requires five years of study.

    I assumed that Pete was referring to his dogs anyway....


    --
    Mark

    http://www.gunculture.net

    "the subjects... may have arms for their defence"
    English Bill of Rights
  14. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Thanks for all the advice gents!

    >The midges are really bad here just now and I'm using Avon's
    >Skin-So-Soft moisturiser spray as a repellent. Works really well.
    >However, I draw the line at carrying a bottle of nail varnish as well.
    >The locals might start talking...

    Particularly the skin so soft bit Kim.. Sounds like a nicer way to
    keep the buggers at bay than bog standard midge spray. If that keeps
    the ticks off too, then Ill have nice soft skin like you:)

    I used to teach in Golspie High School, - the locals dont need much
    to make them talk!

    The midges up your way are very very nasty!
  15. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    The message <ns8sc059hji23l7pa80dqi4ae8aup5uul4@4ax.com>
    from hungryrob <hungryrob@hotmail.com> contains these words:

    > Particularly the skin so soft bit Kim.. Sounds like a nicer way to
    > keep the buggers at bay than bog standard midge spray. If that keeps
    > the ticks off too, then Ill have nice soft skin like you:)

    I was skeptical at first but it really works, and if it works here it
    will work anywhere.

    > I used to teach in Golspie High School, - the locals dont need much
    > to make them talk!

    Little has changed since you left.

    > The midges up your way are very very nasty!

    Tell me about it! I have to be very careful as I react to midge bites
    like most people react to a wasp sting. And you know what they say about
    midges: kill one and a thousand more will come to the funeral.

    --
    Kim Sawyer
    Sutherland
    Scotland
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