New .22 air rifle

Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

Well, I have gone and bought myself a secondhand HW77 from a dealer. Seems
to be a very well engineered rifle by all accounts and well tried. I really
did not want to spend a huge amount for knocking off vermin on the farm,
either.

I did a fair bit of research and decided the Sheridan pump up I used years
ago was not going to be accurate enough for lamping rabbits. I've been
using the BRNO .22LR which is excellent but will also be knocking off a few
feral pigeons for hawk food and I reasoned it would be counter to public
relations to drill holes through my neighbour's barn roof with the .22!

I am beginning to get quite interested in this air rifle stuff. Things seem
to have moved on from the Diana No. 12 my dad brought back for me from the
war! (That was WWII before anyone asks).

Seems the HW77 is emminently upgradable to FAC standard, too, and Chambers
who stock the higher rated springs and stuff is just 11 miles down the
road! Someone mention 20ft/lbs even!

Now, John, if you are reading this, what do you pest controller bods use
for pest control inside buildings? I've heard of pellets made of sugar for
use within warehouses where food is stored. (Don't want bits of lead
contaminating our food, do we?). But is there anything to cut the energy?
Plastic pellets? I'm thinking feral pigeons on indoor roof members here.

Ye gods, here I go, and the rifle hasn't even arrived yet!<g>

Derry
32 answers Last reply
More about rifle
  1. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Derry Argue wrote:

    > Now, John, if you are reading this, what do you pest controller bods use
    > for pest control inside buildings? I've heard of pellets made of sugar for
    > use within warehouses where food is stored. (Don't want bits of lead
    > contaminating our food, do we?). But is there anything to cut the energy?
    > Plastic pellets? I'm thinking feral pigeons on indoor roof members here.

    From a professional pest control point of view, shooting is the last
    option. First bird proofing work should be carried out, or at least the
    investigation in to the possibility of "proofing" the warehouse / grain
    store has to be shown. If this isn't possible, then shooting isn't going
    to be effective as most birds will simply replace the shot. In highly
    sensitive areas, trapping may take presidency to shooting. Certainly
    where "open" food supplies are being protected the risk of contamination
    by dead birds,pellets, feathers and the like could not be risked, so the
    customer would be asked to remove *all* foods from the area before work
    could take place. Due to H&S in general the hassle factor of using
    rifles has to be taken in to account. All sorts of paper work has to be
    completed, Risk assessments etc.
    Alternative ammo isn't used, again due to legislation. For example, if a
    pest controller was to injure a bird and this could be linked to
    ballistically bad pellets, then the W&C act would kick in (amounts others).
    If shooting was the only way of control and in a food sensitive
    environment, then two things would have to happen, first total
    co-operation from the customer and destruction of *all* possible food
    sources of mark them not fit for human consumption.
    Then the birds would either be baited to ground level, shot using a safe
    back stop or simply stupefied using Alphacloralose technical (spelling?)
    and dispatched with Co2 (again making shoot a second or even third option).

    HTH :)

    John
  2. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 14 Jun 2005 17:56:28 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >Well, I have gone and bought myself a secondhand HW77 from a dealer. Seems
    >to be a very well engineered rifle by all accounts and well tried. I really
    >did not want to spend a huge amount for knocking off vermin on the farm,
    >either.
    >
    Should be a decent enough bit of kit. If
    you've got the eyes for it there should be no problem
    dealing with rabbits or pigeons out to about 40 yards.
    You'll hear plenty of people talk about 70 yard shots,
    bu there's a world of difference between bowling over a
    tin can at that distance and getting a definite kill.
    The closer the better, in my book. My modified Webley
    Hawk will kill out to about 30 yards, but I always
    preferred to get closer.

    >feral pigeons for hawk food and I reasoned it would be counter to public
    >relations to drill holes through my neighbour's barn roof with the .22!

    A corrugated tin roof will stop or deflect
    *most* legal airgun pellets at 20 yards or more. .177
    has a slight edge on penetration of hard objects, and
    *probably* a definite edge on multi-layered energy
    absorbent 'protection' such as a pigeon's breast
    feathers. Corrugated asbestos (sorry, they call it
    cement reinforced particle board nowadays) or plastic
    will normally puncture (small neat holes) with either
    ..22 or .177 fired from inside the building because of
    the closer range. Fired from outside deflection may
    well save the day. Really old - and therefore brittle
    - corrugated plastic sometimes just shatters
    spectacularly ;-)
    >
    >Seems the HW77 is emminently upgradable to FAC standard, too, and Chambers
    >who stock the higher rated springs and stuff is just 11 miles down the
    >road! Someone mention 20ft/lbs even!

    First, give it a good work out without any
    expensive upgrades. Ask your dealer if he can chrono
    the thing and check that it's producing close to the
    legal 12ft/lbs maximum. I've never used an FAC rated
    air rifle, but a lot of people who have say they're
    neither fish nor fowl. Definitely not enough when you
    really need a 'proper' .22, and too much for everday
    shooting. An air rifle is a niche weapon. Use it
    within the intended niche and it will rarely let you
    down.
    >
    >Ye gods, here I go, and the rifle hasn't even arrived yet!<g>

    New Toy syndrome ;-)

    One last point. The right pellets can make all
    the difference. You didn't specify if yours was .22 or
    ..177. Forget the difference types for now (flat heads,
    wadcutters, pointed, roundhead). There are now two
    different *sizes* of .22 pellets. 5.5mm and 5.6mm. If
    memory serves correctly a lot of continental guns are
    happier with a diet of 5.5mm. Not all though, my
    ancient Haenal is stamped as 5.6mm (the English .22)
    and the slightly narrower pellet almost falls through
    the barrel.

    1/10 of a mill may seem bugger all difference,
    but it's a huge gap in engineering terms. A snug
    fitting pellet can turn a noisy twanger into a sweet
    and much quieter rifle. A pellet which is too tight
    will shave lead from the skirt, lose quite a bit of
    power, and perhaps effect accuracy.

    Your HW77 may have the size stamped on the
    barrel. If it does, follow the manufacturers guide.
    Find a pellet which fits well, performs well, and then
    stick with it.

    Enjoy your new toy.

    Gyppo


    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  3. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 14 Jun 2005 17:56:28 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >Well, I have gone and bought myself a secondhand HW77 from a dealer. Seems

    Oops! How the hell did I manage to miss the
    ..22 in the subject line. What a twat!

    Still, this uncharacteristic self-abasement
    allows me to mention a very definite advantage to the
    ..22. The pellets are easier to handle with
    frost-numbed fingers ;-)

    Gyppo - just a tad red-faced
    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  4. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    John <john.p.young*removethislittlebit*@ntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:3h8nedFfoikcU1@individual.net:

    > Derry Argue wrote:
    >
    >> Now, John, if you are reading this, what do you pest controller bods
    >> use for pest control inside buildings? I've heard of pellets made of
    >> sugar for use within warehouses where food is stored. (Don't want
    >> bits of lead contaminating our food, do we?). But is there anything
    >> to cut the energy? Plastic pellets? I'm thinking feral pigeons on
    >> indoor roof members here.
    >
    > From a professional pest control point of view, shooting is the last
    > option. First bird proofing work should be carried out, or at least
    > the investigation in to the possibility of "proofing" the warehouse /
    > grain store has to be shown. If this isn't possible, then shooting
    > isn't going to be effective as most birds will simply replace the
    > shot. In highly sensitive areas, trapping may take presidency to
    > shooting. Certainly where "open" food supplies are being protected the
    > risk of contamination by dead birds,pellets, feathers and the like
    > could not be risked, so the customer would be asked to remove *all*
    > foods from the area before work could take place. Due to H&S in
    > general the hassle factor of using rifles has to be taken in to
    > account. All sorts of paper work has to be completed, Risk assessments
    > etc. Alternative ammo isn't used, again due to legislation. For
    > example, if a pest controller was to injure a bird and this could be
    > linked to ballistically bad pellets, then the W&C act would kick in
    > (amounts others). If shooting was the only way of control and in a
    > food sensitive environment, then two things would have to happen,
    > first total co-operation from the customer and destruction of *all*
    > possible food sources of mark them not fit for human consumption.
    > Then the birds would either be baited to ground level, shot using a
    > safe back stop or simply stupefied using Alphacloralose technical
    > (spelling?) and dispatched with Co2 (again making shoot a second or
    > even third option).
    >
    > HTH :)
    >
    > John

    Cripes! Now, careful John, I am already in a sensitive mental state and all
    that talk of red tape could push me over the edge. If anyone reading this
    is contemplating applying under the Scottish Forestry Grant Scheme without
    an in-house psychiatrist, DON'T! On top of this, I was stupid enough to ask
    DEFRA what I would need if I bought a few head of cattle to keep the grass
    down and a wad of bumph about an inch thick thumped onto the hall floor.
    Thank goodness for old age. These days I just mumble that I'm having one of
    my bad days and I will have to wait for the district nurse to explain it
    all to me. That generally seems to frighten them off and if it doesn't, a
    feigned heart attack generally does the trick!<g>

    Getting back to a serious note, I am now not surprised that so many sellers
    of animal feed stuffs seem to have a bird problem in their warehouses.
    Personally, I would follow the advice given to Queen Victoria about getting
    rid of the plague of sparrows in the Crystal Palace. "Sparrowhawks, ma'am,
    sparrowhawks". They would work, too. Maybe I should set up in business?

    Derry
  5. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:88cua1l8fauuft4f5pbd3i6mo0eq0eno6s@4ax.com:

    > On 14 Jun 2005 17:56:28 GMT, Derry Argue
    > <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>Well, I have gone and bought myself a secondhand HW77 from a dealer.
    >>Seems to be a very well engineered rifle by all accounts and well
    >>tried. I really did not want to spend a huge amount for knocking off
    >>vermin on the farm, either.
    >>
    > Should be a decent enough bit of kit.

    I've been doing some research and it seems to be regarded as one of the
    best of the spring powered air rifles. A pcp would be nice but parting with
    the cash wouldn't!
    >
    > First, give it a good work out without any
    > expensive upgrades. Ask your dealer if he can chrono
    > the thing and check that it's producing close to the
    > legal 12ft/lbs maximum.

    I usually buy privately. Missed another at £70 but that could have been a
    mistake. Paid £130 from the dealer plus £15 delivery fore this one and I am
    assured it is sound. "We have a reputation so don't sell rubbish". Missed a
    HW77 silencer for £20 last night but maybe that isn't necessary for lamping
    rabbits anyway.

    Use it
    > within the intended niche and it will rarely let you
    > down.

    Agreed. I don't expect it to do the job of the .22LR. I have no experience
    of modern air rifles and just assumed what was said was exaggerated
    nonsense.


    > One last point. The right pellets can make all
    > the difference.

    Yes. I've done some research on that too. Weight seems to be the critical
    factor. Fortunately, the rifle has been out for over 10 years and there is
    plenty of information out there. I have been reading up about tuning and
    adjusting the trigger action. I must say I do like a nice trigger!

    Forget the difference types for now (flat heads,
    > wadcutters, pointed, roundhead). There are now two
    > different *sizes* of .22 pellets. 5.5mm and 5.6mm.

    Apparently the HW77 has a choked barrel! Incredible!

    > Find a pellet which fits well, performs well, and then
    > stick with it.

    Sounds like a good excuse for lots of playing! Goodie!!<vbg>


    > Enjoy your new toy.
    >
    > Gyppo
    >

    Derry
  6. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    I have a HW77K in .22 calibre, and I definitely say without any doubt that
    it is an excellent air rifle. I was genuinely surprised at how accurate it
    is when I use the right pellets. Using a scope and a bench rest it will
    group to within 1" at 25 metres, even when I am using it. It has an
    excellent trigger, far better than any other non target rifle I have ever
    used, and is very solidly built.
    I tend to use the rimfire or .223 most of the time nowadays, but I will
    never sell the HW77.
    I will post back when I remember which type of pellets works best. I seem to
    remember that they were German wad cutters possibly H&N or similar.
    Regards

    Sean

    "Derry Argue" <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:Xns96765EB3F2E70derryadviegundogscou@130.133.1.4...
    >J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    > news:88cua1l8fauuft4f5pbd3i6mo0eq0eno6s@4ax.com:
    >
    >> On 14 Jun 2005 17:56:28 GMT, Derry Argue
    >> <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Well, I have gone and bought myself a secondhand HW77 from a dealer.
    >>>Seems to be a very well engineered rifle by all accounts and well
    >>>tried. I really did not want to spend a huge amount for knocking off
    >>>vermin on the farm, either.
    >>>
    >> Should be a decent enough bit of kit.
    >
    > I've been doing some research and it seems to be regarded as one of the
    > best of the spring powered air rifles. A pcp would be nice but parting
    > with
    > the cash wouldn't!
    >>
    >> First, give it a good work out without any
    >> expensive upgrades. Ask your dealer if he can chrono
    >> the thing and check that it's producing close to the
    >> legal 12ft/lbs maximum.
    >
    > I usually buy privately. Missed another at £70 but that could have been a
    > mistake. Paid £130 from the dealer plus £15 delivery fore this one and I
    > am
    > assured it is sound. "We have a reputation so don't sell rubbish". Missed
    > a
    > HW77 silencer for £20 last night but maybe that isn't necessary for
    > lamping
    > rabbits anyway.
    >
    > Use it
    >> within the intended niche and it will rarely let you
    >> down.
    >
    > Agreed. I don't expect it to do the job of the .22LR. I have no experience
    > of modern air rifles and just assumed what was said was exaggerated
    > nonsense.
    >
    >
    >> One last point. The right pellets can make all
    >> the difference.
    >
    > Yes. I've done some research on that too. Weight seems to be the critical
    > factor. Fortunately, the rifle has been out for over 10 years and there is
    > plenty of information out there. I have been reading up about tuning and
    > adjusting the trigger action. I must say I do like a nice trigger!
    >
    > Forget the difference types for now (flat heads,
    >> wadcutters, pointed, roundhead). There are now two
    >> different *sizes* of .22 pellets. 5.5mm and 5.6mm.
    >
    > Apparently the HW77 has a choked barrel! Incredible!
    >
    >> Find a pellet which fits well, performs well, and then
    >> stick with it.
    >
    > Sounds like a good excuse for lots of playing! Goodie!!<vbg>
    >
    >
    >> Enjoy your new toy.
    >>
    >> Gyppo
    >>
    >
    > Derry
  7. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    "Sean" <seansafetypin@rpe-colne.co.uk> wrote in
    news:d8op3n$3t0$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk:

    > I have a HW77K in .22 calibre, and I definitely say without any doubt
    > that it is an excellent air rifle. I was genuinely surprised at how
    > accurate it is when I use the right pellets. Using a scope and a bench
    > rest it will group to within 1" at 25 metres, even when I am using it.
    > It has an excellent trigger, far better than any other non target
    > rifle I have ever used, and is very solidly built.
    > I tend to use the rimfire or .223 most of the time nowadays, but I
    > will never sell the HW77.
    > I will post back when I remember which type of pellets works best. I
    > seem to remember that they were German wad cutters possibly H&N or
    > similar. Regards
    >
    > Sean

    According to what I've Googled, the following are all recommended, but I
    cannot say what the common factor is, though possibly weight:

    15.9 grain JSB Extracts
    H&N Field & Target Trophy.
    *H&N Barracuda - Extra Heavy
    *RWS Super domes
    Bisley Super Field

    I've tended to make a note of those recommended for hunting. Those marked *
    were recommended by several reviewers.

    The only problem I can foresee is having to cock the HW77 betweem shots
    when lamping rabbits off the quad. I have a pretty efficient system. The
    "cabin controlled search light" is attached above my head on a sort of roll
    cage. I fix the beam straight ahead, aimed at a spot about 25 yards in
    front. The rifle rests on a cross bar on the roll cage. Rabbits are
    spotted, I hit the brakes, possibly adjust the spotlight, shoot, drive to
    collect rabbit which is thrown over my shoulder into one of those big
    builder's buckets strapped to the rear carrier -- then on to the next! The
    roll cage was made up to take the spot light for foxing and it has been
    tremendously useful. I can stand on the seat of the quad and shoot off the
    top so it is also a mini high seat. The frame is made of 25mm box section
    and it bolts to the quad instead of the front and rear carriers.

    Going back to the HW77, the trigger unit is apparently made by Rekord and
    is a double lever. It is said to be one of the best types of trigger on any
    rifle. It is a two stager with both stages fully adjustable.

    I am truly shocked that you will not sell me your WH77 as I was hoping to
    get a matched pair!<vbg>

    Derry
  8. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 15 Jun 2005 08:10:04 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >Apparently the HW77 has a choked barrel! Incredible!
    >
    Way back when I used to write fairly regularly
    for airgun magazines this slight choke was one of the
    'great secrets' of the better target air rifles. When
    it was first applied to hunting and Field Target rifles
    many people just assumed that certain makes were more
    inherently accurate due to better build quality.

    Then there was a wave of customisations,
    carbine length barrels and moderators being popular.
    On most rifles it was perfectly reasonable to crop a
    few inches from the end, cut a thread, and fit a
    moderator. A good selling point and in most cases no
    damage done and no real difference in performance.

    But if you lopped the choked section then the
    previously super-accurate rifle went badly down hill
    ;-) The serious customisers knew this and removed the
    surplus at the breech end, thus preserving the 'choke',
    but this wasn't a job for the hacksaw and gas-pipe die
    brigade.

    >Sounds like a good excuse for lots of playing! Goodie!!<vbg>
    >
    Oh, there's no end to the playing around you
    can do ;-)

    Gyppo

    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  9. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Using those methods, I hope you have a really big bucket for the rabbits
    ;¬)

    Sean


    "Derry Argue" <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:Xns967682F5FEC2Ederryadviegundogscou@130.133.1.4...
    > "Sean" <seansafetypin@rpe-colne.co.uk> wrote in
    > news:d8op3n$3t0$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk:
    >
    >> I have a HW77K in .22 calibre, and I definitely say without any doubt
    >> that it is an excellent air rifle. I was genuinely surprised at how
    >> accurate it is when I use the right pellets. Using a scope and a bench
    >> rest it will group to within 1" at 25 metres, even when I am using it.
    >> It has an excellent trigger, far better than any other non target
    >> rifle I have ever used, and is very solidly built.
    >> I tend to use the rimfire or .223 most of the time nowadays, but I
    >> will never sell the HW77.
    >> I will post back when I remember which type of pellets works best. I
    >> seem to remember that they were German wad cutters possibly H&N or
    >> similar. Regards
    >>
    >> Sean
    >
    > According to what I've Googled, the following are all recommended, but I
    > cannot say what the common factor is, though possibly weight:
    >
    > 15.9 grain JSB Extracts
    > H&N Field & Target Trophy.
    > *H&N Barracuda - Extra Heavy
    > *RWS Super domes
    > Bisley Super Field
    >
    > I've tended to make a note of those recommended for hunting. Those marked
    > *
    > were recommended by several reviewers.
    >
    > The only problem I can foresee is having to cock the HW77 betweem shots
    > when lamping rabbits off the quad. I have a pretty efficient system. The
    > "cabin controlled search light" is attached above my head on a sort of
    > roll
    > cage. I fix the beam straight ahead, aimed at a spot about 25 yards in
    > front. The rifle rests on a cross bar on the roll cage. Rabbits are
    > spotted, I hit the brakes, possibly adjust the spotlight, shoot, drive to
    > collect rabbit which is thrown over my shoulder into one of those big
    > builder's buckets strapped to the rear carrier -- then on to the next! The
    > roll cage was made up to take the spot light for foxing and it has been
    > tremendously useful. I can stand on the seat of the quad and shoot off the
    > top so it is also a mini high seat. The frame is made of 25mm box section
    > and it bolts to the quad instead of the front and rear carriers.
    >
    > Going back to the HW77, the trigger unit is apparently made by Rekord and
    > is a double lever. It is said to be one of the best types of trigger on
    > any
    > rifle. It is a two stager with both stages fully adjustable.
    >
    > I am truly shocked that you will not sell me your WH77 as I was hoping to
    > get a matched pair!<vbg>
    >
    > Derry
  10. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    One of the major regrets in my life was not buying a cased air gun I saw in
    an antique shop.

    The air container was in the stock which was covered in shagreen (shark
    skin). The kit included a rifled barrel and a smooth barrel, inter-
    changeable, and simply screwed home; a bullet mold and pump, plus the usual
    accessories; all contained in a beautiful mahogany case. I think the breech
    was engraved with rampant stags, etc. That must have been around 1957 and
    it was all in pristine condition.

    But the price was beyond my reach at the time. All of ten quid!
    Aaaarrggh!!!

    I did have one of those pump up walking stick air guns, though. The seal
    had cracked (looked like it had been turned out of a piece of cow's horn)
    but I made another by heating up an old nylon hypodermic and moulding it
    into shape! It was pretty lethal and would put a 3/8th inch lead slug
    through a half inch board with no problems.

    Derry
  11. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Derry Argue wrote:

    > Getting back to a serious note, I am now not surprised that so many sellers
    > of animal feed stuffs seem to have a bird problem in their warehouses.
    > Personally, I would follow the advice given to Queen Victoria about getting
    > rid of the plague of sparrows in the Crystal Palace. "Sparrowhawks, ma'am,
    > sparrowhawks". They would work, too. Maybe I should set up in business?

    Big business Derry!

    We use hawks and so do many companies.
    This is done on a subcontract basis and it is most valued if the chap
    with the birds can pose as an employee of the pest control company.

    John
  12. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 15 Jun 2005 14:59:50 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >One of the major regrets in my life was not buying a cased air gun I saw in
    >an antique shop.
    >
    >The air container was in the stock which was covered in shagreen (shark
    >skin). The kit included a rifled barrel and a smooth barrel, inter-
    >changeable, and simply screwed home; a bullet mold and pump, plus the usual
    >accessories; all contained in a beautiful mahogany case. I think the breech
    >was engraved with rampant stags, etc. That must have been around 1957 and
    >it was all in pristine condition.
    >
    >But the price was beyond my reach at the time. All of ten quid!
    >Aaaarrggh!!!
    >
    Aaaarrggh indeed ;-(

    >I did have one of those pump up walking stick air guns, though. The seal
    >had cracked (looked like it had been turned out of a piece of cow's horn)
    >but I made another by heating up an old nylon hypodermic and moulding it
    >into shape! It was pretty lethal and would put a 3/8th inch lead slug
    >through a half inch board with no problems.

    Yes, horn was the material of choice.
    Supposedly it had the correct balance of firmness and
    resilience if it was lapped properly to fit the valve.
    A lot of the early plastics called upon to replace
    tired or brittle horn valves were either too hard (and
    thus tended to leak unless they were a perfect match),
    or too soft (in which case the valve didn't open
    cleanly enough when struck by the hammer). It sounds
    as if your hypodermic improvisation struck the happy
    medium.

    In one of my old airgun books - away in the
    loft so I can't just check it out - the writer refers
    to 'testing' such an air-cane. He fired several shots
    into a target on a barn door and was horrified to find
    they had smashed straight through, puncturing a jacket
    hung on the inside. They had travelled the length of
    the barn - fortunately no-one was inside at the time -
    and exited through the back wall and finally done
    'considerable damage to the wheel of a bicycle leaned
    against the back wall'.

    My cousin once did something similar with a
    70lb draw-weight crossbow and one of those flimsy
    'shiplap' sheds. His Dad did 'considerable damage' to
    his backside to teach him the error of his ways.

    More innocent and civilised times, eh?

    Gyppo

    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  13. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:89k0b11f35ggqcs9ha51bj743c7mkp8tji@4ax.com:

    > More innocent and civilised times, eh?

    If the modern cops could have seen what we traded at school back in those
    days! Lots of war time souveniers knocking about too. 0.44 Tranter and
    Adams transition revolvers -- two a penny! I bought a .38 Webley service
    revolver for £8. Someone else had a very nice 9mm Luger and we managed to
    "acquire" some ammunition of it from somewhere. Better stop this thread
    here or we will be giving the youngsters some ideas!<g>

    Derry
  14. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 15 Jun 2005 20:06:26 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    >news:89k0b11f35ggqcs9ha51bj743c7mkp8tji@4ax.com:
    >
    >> More innocent and civilised times, eh?
    >
    >If the modern cops could have seen what we traded at school back in those
    >days! Lots of war time souveniers knocking about too. 0.44 Tranter and
    >Adams transition revolvers -- two a penny! I bought a .38 Webley service
    >revolver for £8. Someone else had a very nice 9mm Luger and we managed to
    >"acquire" some ammunition of it from somewhere. Better stop this thread
    >here or we will be giving the youngsters some ideas!<g>
    >
    >Derry

    Getting way off topic here and you're probably
    right, but whilst the nostalgia train's running
    (presumably steam powered) I recall a kid at my junior
    school who brought in a live mortar bomb one Monday
    morning for 'show and tell' ;-) (And what have you
    been doing over the weekend, Children...)

    The female teacher nearly had a fit when he
    just casually lobbed it onto the table. But that was
    nothing to how pale she went when she found out we'd
    all been chucking it around the playground. Seemed
    fair enough, we'd dropped it nose first a few times and
    nothing had happened, so it had to be a 'dud'.

    One of the male teachers - with the requisite
    war wound and appropriate knowledge came in and checked
    it out for her. Told us it was live - not a practice
    round - and that we were a 'lucky little bunch of
    buggers'. We probably all went a bit pale too, but
    were far more excited at having got a teacher to swear
    out loud ;-)

    He carried it carefully out and hid it
    somewhere until the Village Bobby arrived, proper old
    time Bobby, huge chap on a black bike with a double
    crossbar. He asked the lad where he'd found it, nodded
    knowingly, and made a note in his book.

    He then picked up the mortar bomb, spat on it
    and rubbed off a bit more dirt, then just casually
    tossed it into his saddlebag and rode off to the
    copshop at the nearby town. We all watched him ride
    away with boy-like visions in our heads of his great
    fat arse being blown off.

    When some of us went looking after school the
    army or whoever had been and cleared out the rest of
    the arms dump (or Home Guard cache) and blown some of
    the bigger stuff up in situ. But there were still
    various odds and ends of machine gun belt and quite a
    few loose rounds of .303 to be traded.

    They found a bit more stuff when they built on
    that land a few years back, but all the 'good stuff'
    had already gone ;-)

    Gyppo
    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  15. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:p231b1dsthkdtk3ssnliak5tbtaf9gk9kp@4ax.com:

    > When some of us went looking after school the
    > army or whoever had been and cleared out the rest of
    > the arms dump (or Home Guard cache) and blown some of
    > the bigger stuff up in situ.

    Item on TV news tonight, someone had found some old phosphorus incendaries!
    They reckon there are still thousands of Home Guard dumps around the
    country that have been lost or forgotten about!

    I live right next to what was a big airfield during the war. Just up the
    road is a large MOD building where they used to brief the pilots. And so
    on.

    Keep meaning to do some mine detecting... Nearest thing to a weapon so far
    is a flint chip and several dumps of mussel shells (found when digging a
    hole to bury a sheep) from Neolithic times!

    Derry
  16. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 15 Jun 2005 22:07:05 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >Item on TV news tonight, someone had found some old phosphorus incendaries!

    Nasty things...

    >They reckon there are still thousands of Home Guard dumps around the
    >country that have been lost or forgotten about!

    Quite possible. Only a few years back a family
    near Southampton clearing their Dad's house after he
    died found a whole room sealed off. When opened it was
    a veritable Quartermaster's Store of WW2 stuff. Heavy
    tripod mounted belt feed machine guns, rifles, stens,
    grenades, the complete works. His family had no idea
    about his cache. Popular theory was that the old boy
    wasn't just part of the 'ordinary' Home Guard but QM
    for one of the secretive 'stay hidden until the enemy
    think they've won' units. Set up to wreak havoc in the
    aftermath of a successful German invasion. And it has
    been suggested that some of them were kept 'on the
    books' long after in case the Russians ever tried it
    on.

    And it's not that long ago that they rebuilt
    and re-inforced the runway at Southampton Airport to
    take heavier planes. The contractors dug up loads of
    rusty old pipes which turned out to be 'bangalore
    torpedos', tubes filled with explosive and driven
    underneath the runway so it could be blown up and
    rendered useless in the event of an imminent airborne
    invasion. Millions of passengers had rolled over them,
    blissfully unaware for years. ;-)

    All this has really pressed the memory button!

    Gyppo

    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  17. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:4gb1b1h574oofb1tt6k02futvj7lhpbcs7@4ax.com:

    > All this has really pressed the memory button!

    It is really incredible how paranoid the authorities have become. My uncle
    had an explosives licence so he could demolish rocks on the farm. He
    regularly had odd pieces of gelignite casually kicking around in the front
    dash of the Land Rover! A bit dodgey, too, as I gather the stuff can leak
    nitro. One time he blew a large rocky outcrop in the middle of a field --
    and deposited a half ton rock right into the Land Rover! Fortunately, no
    one was sitting in it at the time!<g> After that, he parked it further
    away...

    Derry
  18. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 16 Jun 2005 06:26:46 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >It is really incredible how paranoid the authorities have become. My uncle
    >had an explosives licence so he could demolish rocks on the farm. He
    >regularly had odd pieces of gelignite casually kicking around in the front
    >dash of the Land Rover! A bit dodgey, too, as I gather the stuff can leak
    >nitro. One time he blew a large rocky outcrop in the middle of a field --
    >and deposited a half ton rock right into the Land Rover! Fortunately, no
    >one was sitting in it at the time!<g> After that, he parked it further
    >away...
    >
    I'd like to have seen that ;-) Here's an
    (almost) non-explosive tale handed down by a friend's
    grandfather. Set in a small Hampshire village not far
    from Winchester. Probably not long after WW1.

    The 'Lady' of the village had asked a local
    character - who we shall call 'Dynamite Jack' - to cut
    down and root out a large old Oak tree which was
    leaning and threatening her home.

    Jack sized it up and quoted a price, which was
    acceptable to 'Her Ladyship'. The cutting was no
    problem, a gang of locals set to and did the job in
    short order. But the stump was a problem.

    "I'll soon have that bugger out with a bit of
    dynamite, Milady."

    "Sorry. No dynamite. It might frighten the
    horses. And, worse still, you might damage my Cherry
    tree. You'll have to find another way."

    Jack was proud of his ability to blow stumps
    'as clean as a whistle' but she wouldn't be budged.

    Him and the lads set to with saws,axes,
    crowbars, sledgehammers and wedges. Many of the
    spreading roots were cut off but he soon grew impatient
    with the slow progress. Time was money, especially
    when he'd quoted a fixed price based on blasting the
    stump.

    A few yards away from the stump there grew the
    famous cherry tree, Her Ladyship's pride and
    joy,planted herself when she was younger.

    Jack looked around, made his calculations,
    waited till his employer was out for the day, and set
    up a block and tackle arrangement. The tackle was
    carefully anchored to the Cherry tree with plenty of
    greasy sacking and other padding to protect it.

    A cable was secured to the Oak stump, fed
    through the multi-pulley block and tackle, and Jack was
    thus able to pull at a right angle straight down the
    middle of the ornamental driveway.

    His tractor struggled a bit and then suddenly
    surged forward as the Cherry tree popped from the
    ground 'as clean as a bloody whistle, Boy'. and was
    dragged a few yards from its hole.

    Before Her Ladyship returned they'd poured
    several bags of cement into the hole and managed to
    winch the tree back into almost the same position and
    tidied away most of the evidence. The tree survived
    well beyond Her ladyship's remaining years and the
    troublesome Oak stump was just levelled as best they
    could with fire and hand tools and allowed to merge
    back into the ground.

    Several years later- when Jack was doing some
    other tree work for her - Her Ladyship said, "Have you
    ever noticed how my Cherry tree seems to have
    flourished greatly since you took out that Oak?"

    Gyppo

    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  19. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:hbm2b1dlpruc5aaiivrfmqrb2a53r23k0l@4ax.com:

    > The 'Lady' of the village had asked a local
    > character - who we shall call 'Dynamite Jack' - to cut
    > down and root out a large old Oak tree which was
    > leaning and threatening her home.

    There is nothing stranger than the truth!<g>

    When I ran a sporting agency, I dealt exclusively with North Sea oil
    personnel. They had many a story. One man was an explosives expert and he
    reckoned it was neater and cheaper to use explosives to cut a pipe rather
    than use gas! All this under water, too.

    Derry
  20. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    "Derry Argue" <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:Xns967682F5FEC2Ederryadviegundogscou@130.133.1.4...
    > "Sean" <seansafetypin@rpe-colne.co.uk> wrote in
    > news:d8op3n$3t0$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk:
    >
    >> I have a HW77K in .22 calibre, and I definitely say without any doubt
    >> that it is an excellent air rifle. I was genuinely surprised at how
    >> accurate it is when I use the right pellets. Using a scope and a bench
    >> rest it will group to within 1" at 25 metres, even when I am using it.
    >> It has an excellent trigger, far better than any other non target
    >> rifle I have ever used, and is very solidly built.
    >> I tend to use the rimfire or .223 most of the time nowadays, but I
    >> will never sell the HW77.
    >> I will post back when I remember which type of pellets works best. I
    >> seem to remember that they were German wad cutters possibly H&N or
    >> similar. Regards
    >>
    >> Sean
    >
    > According to what I've Googled, the following are all recommended, but I
    > cannot say what the common factor is, though possibly weight:
    >
    > 15.9 grain JSB Extracts
    > H&N Field & Target Trophy.
    > *H&N Barracuda - Extra Heavy
    > *RWS Super domes
    > Bisley Super Field
    >
    > I've tended to make a note of those recommended for hunting. Those marked
    > *
    > were recommended by several reviewers.
    >

    I found them pellets, they were RWS hobby wadcutters in 5.5mm calibre. I
    have never tried them against rabbits, but against paper targets they are
    the best I have used by far.

    Cheers

    Sean
  21. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    "Sean" <seansafetypin@rpe-colne.co.uk> wrote in
    news:d8u2kl$643$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk:

    > "Derry Argue" <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:Xns967682F5FEC2Ederryadviegundogscou@130.133.1.4...
    >> "Sean" <seansafetypin@rpe-colne.co.uk> wrote in
    >> news:d8op3n$3t0$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk:
    >>
    >>> I have a HW77K in .22 calibre, and I definitely say without any
    >>> doubt that it is an excellent air rifle. I was genuinely surprised
    >>> at how accurate it is when I use the right pellets. Using a scope
    >>> and a bench rest it will group to within 1" at 25 metres, even when
    >>> I am using it. It has an excellent trigger, far better than any
    >>> other non target rifle I have ever used, and is very solidly built.
    >>> I tend to use the rimfire or .223 most of the time nowadays, but I
    >>> will never sell the HW77.
    >>> I will post back when I remember which type of pellets works best. I
    >>> seem to remember that they were German wad cutters possibly H&N or
    >>> similar. Regards
    >>>
    >>> Sean
    >>
    >> According to what I've Googled, the following are all recommended,
    >> but I cannot say what the common factor is, though possibly weight:
    >>
    >> 15.9 grain JSB Extracts
    >> H&N Field & Target Trophy.
    >> *H&N Barracuda - Extra Heavy
    >> *RWS Super domes
    >> Bisley Super Field
    >>
    >> I've tended to make a note of those recommended for hunting. Those
    >> marked *
    >> were recommended by several reviewers.
    >>
    >
    > I found them pellets, they were RWS hobby wadcutters in 5.5mm calibre.
    > I have never tried them against rabbits, but against paper targets
    > they are the best I have used by far.
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Sean
    >
    >
    >

    The man recommended a tin of Bisley super Field and as it was on my list, I
    did not object.

    Started out zeroing the rifle at 16 metres and was grouping about the size
    of a 5p piece just leaning across the bonnet of the Land Rover. Three shots
    went through the same hole! I kid you not! (The shed door is a mess).

    Then moved to shooting off the frame on the quad and at 30 metres I was
    getting consistent 1 inch groups! Quite good enough for lamping.

    Not bad considering this has turned out to be a Mark I. Had it chrono'ed
    this morning and it is decently below 12ft/lbs and very consistent. The
    serial number is 1003558 so I am assuming it was number 3,558 off the
    production line and made well over 20 years ago!

    Shot a woodpigeon out of the kitchen window at about 20 yards tonight. One
    happy owner. Trouble is, I have now got the bug and I am thinking in terms
    of a FAC HW100 for the next acquisition....:(

    Derry
  22. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Derry Argue wrote:
    > "Sean" <seansafetypin@rpe-colne.co.uk> wrote in
    > news:d8u2kl$643$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk:
    >
    >
    >>"Derry Argue" <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>news:Xns967682F5FEC2Ederryadviegundogscou@130.133.1.4...
    >>
    >>>"Sean" <seansafetypin@rpe-colne.co.uk> wrote in
    >>>news:d8op3n$3t0$1$8300dec7@news.demon.co.uk:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I have a HW77K in .22 calibre, and I definitely say without any
    >>>>doubt that it is an excellent air rifle. I was genuinely surprised
    >>>>at how accurate it is when I use the right pellets. Using a scope
    >>>>and a bench rest it will group to within 1" at 25 metres, even when
    >>>>I am using it. It has an excellent trigger, far better than any
    >>>>other non target rifle I have ever used, and is very solidly built.
    >>>>I tend to use the rimfire or .223 most of the time nowadays, but I
    >>>>will never sell the HW77.
    >>>>I will post back when I remember which type of pellets works best. I
    >>>>seem to remember that they were German wad cutters possibly H&N or
    >>>>similar. Regards
    >>>>
    >>>>Sean
    >>>
    >>>According to what I've Googled, the following are all recommended,
    >>>but I cannot say what the common factor is, though possibly weight:
    >>>
    >>>15.9 grain JSB Extracts
    >>>H&N Field & Target Trophy.
    >>>*H&N Barracuda - Extra Heavy
    >>>*RWS Super domes
    >>>Bisley Super Field
    >>>
    >>>I've tended to make a note of those recommended for hunting. Those
    >>>marked *
    >>>were recommended by several reviewers.
    >>>
    >>
    >>I found them pellets, they were RWS hobby wadcutters in 5.5mm calibre.
    >>I have never tried them against rabbits, but against paper targets
    >>they are the best I have used by far.
    >>
    >>Cheers
    >>
    >>Sean
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > The man recommended a tin of Bisley super Field and as it was on my list, I
    > did not object.
    >
    > Started out zeroing the rifle at 16 metres and was grouping about the size
    > of a 5p piece just leaning across the bonnet of the Land Rover. Three shots
    > went through the same hole! I kid you not! (The shed door is a mess).
    >
    > Then moved to shooting off the frame on the quad and at 30 metres I was
    > getting consistent 1 inch groups! Quite good enough for lamping.
    >
    > Not bad considering this has turned out to be a Mark I. Had it chrono'ed
    > this morning and it is decently below 12ft/lbs and very consistent. The
    > serial number is 1003558 so I am assuming it was number 3,558 off the
    > production line and made well over 20 years ago!
    >
    > Shot a woodpigeon out of the kitchen window at about 20 yards tonight. One
    > happy owner. Trouble is, I have now got the bug and I am thinking in terms
    > of a FAC HW100 for the next acquisition....:(
    >
    > Derry

    I picked up a .25 Super sport not long ago. The problem is that the
    rifle literally throws scopes of the rail! So I had to invest in a new
    one piece mount (£40) then there was BSA volumetric silencer (£25), the
    scope (£30) and the rifle set me back (£95). I choronographed the rifle
    and it produces 12 ft-lbs ban on with 18 grain pellets. One groups at 20
    yds and it knocks rats for six! My guess is that it'll be great for
    lamping but at a total cost of £190 I think I should have invested in a
    ..308 P&H :(

    John
  23. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 17 Jun 2005 19:33:28 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:


    >Started out zeroing the rifle at 16 metres and was grouping about the size
    >of a 5p piece just leaning across the bonnet of the Land Rover. Three shots
    >went through the same hole! I kid you not! (The shed door is a mess).
    >
    It inspires confidence when a new 'toy' does
    the business right from the beginning, doesn't it?

    >Not bad considering this has turned out to be a Mark I. Had it chrono'ed
    >this morning and it is decently below 12ft/lbs and very consistent.

    As long as there's enough power for a clean
    kill it's that shot to shot consistency that counts
    with an air rifle.

    >Shot a woodpigeon out of the kitchen window at about 20 yards tonight. One
    >happy owner. Trouble is, I have now got the bug and I am thinking in terms
    >of a FAC HW100 for the next acquisition....:(
    >
    Hooked ;-)

    Gyppo

    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  24. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:e6f6b1phtpkjgvci0og3enjthco6lcpkni@4ax.com:

    > It inspires confidence when a new 'toy' does
    > the business right from the beginning, doesn't it?

    Tweaked the trigger up from about 3/4lb to 1.5lb this evening. This rifle,
    in spite of a few odd patches of surface rust, has clearly been looked
    after by someone. I am not used to removing screws to find BOTH sets of
    original washers still there after 20+ years! Playing this evening, I was
    putting pellets through an 1/2 inch thick telephone directory!

    Derry
  25. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 17 Jun 2005 23:06:22 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >Tweaked the trigger up from about 3/4lb to 1.5lb this evening. This rifle,
    >in spite of a few odd patches of surface rust, has clearly been looked
    >after by someone. I am not used to removing screws to find BOTH sets of
    >original washers still there after 20+ years! Playing this evening, I was
    >putting pellets through an 1/2 inch thick telephone directory!
    >
    Sounds as if you've struck lucky. You've got
    your hands on the semi-mythical 'well used but not
    abused' specimen. Nicely 'run in' and probably fit to
    go another 20 years with little more than an occasional
    new spring.

    Gyppo

    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  26. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    J Craggs <gyppo1@NOSPAMPLEASEOLDCHAPntlworld.com> wrote in
    news:t5p6b15jlpav8l3sb2ad0kq81rpc06c7nr@4ax.com:

    > On 17 Jun 2005 23:06:22 GMT, Derry Argue
    > <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>Tweaked the trigger up from about 3/4lb to 1.5lb this evening. This
    >>rifle, in spite of a few odd patches of surface rust, has clearly been
    >>looked after by someone. I am not used to removing screws to find BOTH
    >>sets of original washers still there after 20+ years! Playing this
    >>evening, I was putting pellets through an 1/2 inch thick telephone
    >>directory!
    >>
    > Sounds as if you've struck lucky. You've got
    > your hands on the semi-mythical 'well used but not
    > abused' specimen. Nicely 'run in' and probably fit to
    > go another 20 years with little more than an occasional
    > new spring.
    >
    > Gyppo
    >
    > John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    > and All-Round Rogue
    > Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    > mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
    >

    Yeah, but that has put paid to a series of fun session of tweaking, hasn't
    it?<g>

    Derry
    (Inveterate tweaker)
  27. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    On 18 Jun 2005 11:56:10 GMT, Derry Argue
    <home@adviegundogs.co.uk> wrote:

    >Yeah, but that has put paid to a series of fun session of tweaking, hasn't
    >it?<g>
    >
    >Derry
    >(Inveterate tweaker)

    Not at all ;-) All you need to find now is
    ananothjer air rifle. An 'abused but still
    serviceable' one that most dealers would consign to the
    scrap bin, and then tweak away to your heart's content.
    You wouldn't feel bad about doing some of the more
    drastic stuff (barrel shortening, etc) that you'd hate
    to do to a good one.

    Gyppo

    John Craggs - Writer - Adult Tutor - Storyteller
    and All-Round Rogue
    Need a laugh? Then subscribe to the free Monday Silly Digest:
    mail to: gyppo1@ntlworld.com With 'MSD SUB' as subject.
  28. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    stu|3 wrote:

    > I imagine that I will be upsetting a fair few people with my wayward
    > comments,

    No not really. As a matter of fact I for one am rather amused.

    John
  29. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    stu|3 <stu@td4.net> wrote in news:BF473D52.52A%stu@td4.net:

    > Get a .22 rimfire, it's all you'll ever need for shooting anything up
    > to the size of a Deer (possibly I'd think twice about shooting a fox
    > with one, I doubt it would bring the animal down in one) but
    > everything else is fair game,

    Well, I have rabbits appearing on the lawn. I COULD shoot them with the
    ..22LR -- but if I did that, I would be shooting towards the road. Instead,
    I leave the window open and pop them when I get up first thing in the
    morning with the HW77. But, yes, I agree. Rabbits need to be shot in the
    head or they keep on going.

    Where I live, it is dead flat. I go round at night shooting rabbits off the
    quad with the .22LR, but I am never really happy because it is so flat. And
    the .22 does ricochet. Oh, it is safe or I wouldn't do it. But...

    I am still toying with the idea of a FAC .22 Rapid. But all the ones I've
    seen advertised are either left handers or "immaculate condition".Then
    there is the new legislation. Will there be so many "free to good home"
    that I will have to beat them of with a stick? OK, twist my arm. I'll give
    you a couple of quid for one AND pay postage....

    Derry
  30. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Fair enough :-)

    Shooting towards a road, an air-rifle IS probably the best bet, good luck
    with that, a friend of mine just bought an webley longbow spring powered
    rifle, and I must say, as springers go, it doesn't seem too bad, the snub
    nose silencer on the end seems a bit pointless, as did the ported
    muzzle-break that came supplied with the rifle.

    An update :

    I purchased the single shot adapter for the HW100 and it's a superbly
    engineered bit of kit, if you own a Weirauch HW100, get one.
    Again, too bad it's on my air rifle... :-)

    There's also a nice new sort of copper plated .22 diabolo type slugs out
    there, I've shot with them and I must say they're not bad... probably be
    better in a FAC rated weapon as they're a 'sniff on the heavy side', however
    (ala my previous rant) with air rifle shooting and the ranges you deal with,
    I just keep on buying different types of slug to 'test' them out.
    So far I've found .22 Superpoint Extra slugs are pretty impressive 'across
    the board' (i.e. work well with any type of .22 rifle), they fly nice and
    flat, don't weigh much and provide some excellent penetration capabilities,
    however, sometimes they tend to go right through the target and keep
    going... (that horrible hollow thump, you know it right?)

    I'd go out on a limb and say "Weihrauch air rifles are the best"

    I have considered many rifles in my time and the HW series are the best
    engineered yet, the Super16's (although I've never owned one) get a bad
    press from every gunsmith I visit.

    I did consider a BSA Superten Bull-barrel carbine, nice action, however the
    integrally silenced barrel is a little on the heavy side, looks good though.

    I'm glad I settled for the Weirauch HW100, superb side lever action, no
    double-loading (rifle is engineered so that you'd have to work pretty hard
    to load two rounds), superb accuracy, ambidextrous stock.

    The silencer (which is heat-treated onto the barrel) -could- have done with
    a screw on / screw off arrangement as changing it to a better one ( the
    silencer supplied is merely... ok) requires some work by your gunsmith, I
    wouldn't like to try it myself.


    Damn air rifles... :-)


    in article Xns96CCD5CAF46E8derryadviegundogscou@130.133.1.4, Derry Argue at
    home@adviegundogs.co.uk wrote on 9/9/05 8:58 pm:

    > stu|3 <stu@td4.net> wrote in news:BF473D52.52A%stu@td4.net:
    >
    >> Get a .22 rimfire, it's all you'll ever need for shooting anything up
    >> to the size of a Deer (possibly I'd think twice about shooting a fox
    >> with one, I doubt it would bring the animal down in one) but
    >> everything else is fair game,
    >
    > Well, I have rabbits appearing on the lawn. I COULD shoot them with the
    > .22LR -- but if I did that, I would be shooting towards the road. Instead,
    > I leave the window open and pop them when I get up first thing in the
    > morning with the HW77. But, yes, I agree. Rabbits need to be shot in the
    > head or they keep on going.
    >
    > Where I live, it is dead flat. I go round at night shooting rabbits off the
    > quad with the .22LR, but I am never really happy because it is so flat. And
    > the .22 does ricochet. Oh, it is safe or I wouldn't do it. But...
    >
    > I am still toying with the idea of a FAC .22 Rapid. But all the ones I've
    > seen advertised are either left handers or "immaculate condition".Then
    > there is the new legislation. Will there be so many "free to good home"
    > that I will have to beat them of with a stick? OK, twist my arm. I'll give
    > you a couple of quid for one AND pay postage....
    >
    > Derry
  31. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    stu|3 <stu@td4.net> wrote in news:BF4B1336.65F%stu@td4.net:

    > Shooting towards a road, an air-rifle IS probably the best bet,

    ....and up into the air.

    Not sure if shooting young rooks is still legal but I intend to give my
    local rookery a pasting next year in revenge for their cleaning out the
    pheasant feeders! I would not care to do that with a .22LR.

    Yes, the Weirauch has a very good reputation. I did a fair bit of research
    before getting the 77 and I am impressed, except for the lack of knock-down
    capabilities on rabbits.

    I would like to try the Rapid in FAC. I am seeing occasional hot spots for
    rabbits from the car window where they are back to 1950's plague
    proportions!

    Derry
  32. Archived from groups: uk.rec.shooting.game (More info?)

    Good luck with that old boy !

    Funny you should mention the words 'plauge' and 'rabbits', I've been
    thinking the same thing around here in Northumberland. I've tagged more with
    my trusty 'benz in the last week that I have going out shooting them!
    They're throwing themselves into the road willingly !

    Jokes aside however, I do agree that the population is reaching the 'well
    stocked' level and we should band together and take one last stand lest the
    'big rats' move in and take our right to vote !

    I read an interesting article in an issue of 'Air Gunner' that claimed a
    recipe for 'bunny bait' some form of carrot / herbal mash as I recall, i
    never did try it out as it was published earlier in the year and 'baiting'
    them seemed like a waste of time, however, as the autumn and (oh so long)
    winter months begin to set in who knows what I shall have to resort to...

    Gurella tactics ? I once saw a man ignite a 'smoke bomb' (it was like a
    small pellet of chalk you wrapped in a sheet of newspaper?, don't know what
    that stuff is, same as what the british gas chap uses to test the chimney
    though) and lob that down a warren, the results were spectacular, and I
    watched in amazement as the bunnies (and smoke) poured forth from the many
    interconnecting holes of the warren. I don't know if they would ever go back
    in after that kind of treatment ? It did demonstrate the scope of this
    particular warren and was interesting to see where the holes were in
    relation to 'the one you found'. Of course this wasn't being done in any
    kind of sporting sense, it was merely an effort to try and drive out vermin.


    in article Xns96CF84D0EC722derryadviegundogscou@130.133.1.4, Derry Argue at
    home@adviegundogs.co.uk wrote on 12/9/05 1:00 pm:

    > stu|3 <stu@td4.net> wrote in news:BF4B1336.65F%stu@td4.net:
    >
    >> Shooting towards a road, an air-rifle IS probably the best bet,
    >
    > ...and up into the air.
    >
    > Not sure if shooting young rooks is still legal but I intend to give my
    > local rookery a pasting next year in revenge for their cleaning out the
    > pheasant feeders! I would not care to do that with a .22LR.
    >
    > Yes, the Weirauch has a very good reputation. I did a fair bit of research
    > before getting the 77 and I am impressed, except for the lack of knock-down
    > capabilities on rabbits.
    >
    > I would like to try the Rapid in FAC. I am seeing occasional hot spots for
    > rabbits from the car window where they are back to 1950's plague
    > proportions!
    >
    > Derry
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