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Multiplier vs. FSB!

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Anonymous
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September 9, 2001 7:28:42 PM

I wonder if I can't achieve 1Ghz from my 800Mhz using only multiple ( setting it from 8 to 10 at 100fsb) will I be able to achieve it using 7.5 multiplier and 133mhz fsb? or if it can't achieve one way - it won't do it any other way?
(A7V133 motherboard based on KT133A chipset)

More about : multiplier fsb

September 10, 2001 2:09:34 AM

it would be nice if you could use the 133mhz fsb, but really dont think it would work.

those older athlons really wernt good for fsb overclocking.
best if you do multiplier...

course you can always try both.
just remember that you will most likely also have to increase the voltage too.

I'll respect your comments & opinions, even if i disagree with them, Provided you display maturity.
September 10, 2001 2:49:11 AM

Probably if you can't achieve one way you won't be able to achieve the other way. It's a CPU core limitation only.
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September 10, 2001 3:01:18 AM

FSB

Nice Nvidia and ATi users get a Cookie.... :smile: Yummy :smile:
Anonymous
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September 10, 2001 4:18:24 AM

I say multipliers your PCI card wont screw up that much.

AMD user's always have the edge !
Anonymous
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September 10, 2001 4:18:33 AM

I say multipliers your PCI card's wont screw up that much.

AMD user's always have the edge !
September 10, 2001 5:50:37 AM

Both, why limit yourself to one or the other.

~Matisaro~
"The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark"
~Tbird1.3@1.5~
Anonymous
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September 25, 2001 7:57:00 PM

I have a question about multiplier vs. fsb. It is kinda theoretical, and long winded, but please read though. If I am wronge about my pressumptions, I may have a computer revelation! If I am right, I am very confused about my computers present state.

GIVENS:

First I am assuming that fsb is the frequency at which the processor runs a cycle, and the multiplier is the number of operations per cycle. This is what I understand to be truth, but I may be wronge.

If a CPU rated at 1200mhz runs at 133 mhz fsb (or 266 DDR as the case is), it performs 9 functions per cycle (9x multiplier). It would subsequently perform bettee than a 1200mhz rated CPU that runs at 100mhz fsb (200 DDR) that performs 12 operations per cycle.

If that is also true, then a 1200 mhz cpu@133 (266 DDR) fsb is capable of running more operations per second than a 1200 mhz cpu@100 (200 DDR) fsb). Which is why the 100fsb CPU cannot be expected to run as fast as the 133fsb CPU.

Question:

If you were to plug a 1200mhz@133mhz fsb CPU into a motherboard that only supports 100mhz fsb, the 133mhz CPU should be capable of running a 'downclocked' 1200mhz @ 100mhz fsb because it is processing less operations per second, right?

The alternative is that the CPU is limited by the number of operations it can perform per cycle rather than per second, which doesn't make sense to me; although that is how tech support explained it to me.

"We are jolly green giants wandering the earth, with guns!"

[H] - Piezo
September 25, 2001 8:07:00 PM

"First I am assuming that fsb is the frequency at which the processor runs a cycle, and the multiplier is the number of operations per cycle."

Sorry, this is wrong. The CPU's clockspeed is determined by the external clock (used as the FSB clockspeed) multiplied by the 'multiplier.' A 1200MHz CPU has 1200 clock (cycles) per second. It has the same number of cycles per second whether it is running with a 100MHz external clock and 12 multipler, or a 133MHz external clock and 9 multiplier. The multiplier simply dictates how many clocks the CPU should issue per external clock. The number of operations per clock has nothing to do with any of this. It is a static function of the design of the CPU. It will not increase without a redesign of the CPU core.

Now then, you might be wondering what an increased FSB clockspeed offers. Simply put, it allows more data to be transmitted between the CPU and memory. If the CPU is executing an application that deals with a great deal of data in memory, an increased FSB clockspeed allows this data to be transmitted to the CPU from memory at an increased speed. The quicker the CPU gets its data, the quicker it can operate on it.

-Raystonn


= The views stated herein are my personal views, and not necessarily the views of my employer. =
Anonymous
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September 25, 2001 11:46:34 PM

Ok, that is logical. However, the tech guys at abit still told me my 1200mhz@266 T-Bird would not run 1200mhz@200 because it couldn't handle a multiplier of 12, rather than 9.

"We are jolly green giants wandering the earth, with guns!"

[H] - Piezo
Anonymous
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September 25, 2001 11:50:59 PM

And for the record, right now it won't run at 1200@200. i think it may be a heat issue, although the Super Orb idles it @ 34 and peaks @ 54 (Celcius), which seems reasonable (hmmm, but that is when I underclock it to 1000@200, so it will load windows....)

"We are jolly green giants wandering the earth, with guns!"

[H] - Piezo
September 25, 2001 11:55:55 PM

That makes no sense. Abit may be wrong there. You would actually be turning down your FSB from 133MHz to 100MHz. The CPU itself would remain at exactly the same speed when you increased the clock multiplier. Can you try it out?

-Raystonn


= The views stated herein are my personal views, and not necessarily the views of my employer. =
Anonymous
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September 26, 2001 3:37:28 AM

I did try that out. My cpu only runs windows stablily at 1100 mhz or lower. I have tried increasing the voltage, but it didn't help the situation. The Super Orb can cool the cpu running at 1000 mhz down to 29 Celcius, but at load it tops fifty two. I think that may be the problem and I have ordered an sk6 with a delta, but fifty two isn't all that high.

"We are jolly green giants wandering the earth, with guns!"

[H] - Piezo
September 26, 2001 9:09:06 AM

all orbs save for the dragon orb suck, any chip which runs at 9x133 should run at 12x100, there is no reason why it shouldnt. Somthing is not right there.

~Matisaro~
"The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark"
~Tbird1.3@1.5~
September 26, 2001 3:31:07 PM

You may have said this, but I didn't see it. Which Abit board do you have, and what BIOS is it?

<font color=green>In memory of all the Americans that died 9/11/01
Rest in peace</font color=green>
Anonymous
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September 27, 2001 12:41:21 AM

Abit KT7-Raid (not A, hence the inability to run 266), I am using ZT bios, and I really don't want to upgrade to a newr bios, since I will lose my raid 0 array. I have ordered an SK6, bu the guy in the store kept trying to convince me to buy his in-stock $20 no-name big-mutha of a heatsink.

"We are jolly green giants wandering the earth, with guns!"

[H] - Piezo
September 27, 2001 5:41:49 PM

You should be fine running at 12x100. A friend of mine has the KT7, and he's got a 1.2/200 on it right now. And it's overclocked past that, too. I don't know what BIOS he has, it's the newest I'm pretty sure.

<font color=green>I post so you don't have to!
9/11 - RIP</font color=green>
!