What's Hot & What's Not

Howdy,

Just joined the ranks of high speed CPU users with my new Athlon 1.4Ghz and ASUS A7A266 and been thrust into the world of temp monitoring, fan rpm's etc etc.

Never had to worry about this with the overclocked PPro!

Now I have alarms alarming and monitoring windows popping in my face with predictions of impending meltdown.

At first, when the cpu temp hit 70c it was song and dance time. Now I've flashed a newer bios revision and it's allowed me to raise the alarm threshold.

Thing is, what should it be set to?

Living in the tropics I generally get cpu temps around 75 - 84c and m/b temps around 35-38c. Is this acceptable?

I noticed the chip specs for the AMD Athlon 1400 have a max die temp of 95c. I'm presuming whatever is measuring my system will be slightly lower than this since it's probably only *near* the die not on it.

Anyway, comments? Tips? Advice?

Cheers,

Finn61
8 answers Last reply
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  1. ouch, thats way too high for me, is your heatsink seated correctly? have oyu got thermal compound on it? what type of hsf is it? I know amd say the chip can run at 90C but if your car engine can do 8000rpm, would you drive round in 1st gear all day doing that? around 50C or so cpu temp is generally regarded the realistic max, however cooler is generally better, do you have any case fans at all, your case temps seem hot too. I did away with all those fans and stuff and decided to do <A HREF="http://www.calvsplace.cwc.net" target="_new">THIS</A> instead. you may be better posting in the overclocking forum under cooling.


    Next time you wave - use all your fingers
  2. 70-90 degrees C is way too high, thats almost melting temps for a cpu, no kidding!
    By the way 50C or lower is the aim for cpu temps' and 30C is a reasonable system temp'. The other thing the Asus probe does not give an accurate reading either, can be out 10C.

    Well having lived up that way myself for a short time I am very aware of how hot it gets. Do you have air con? stick that on for a start.
    Make sure the Heat Sink Fan(HSF)is on the cpu properly with some Artic Silver II thermal paste to replace that thermal pad on the HSF base, this is magical stuff and may reduce temps by 10C.
    What HSF do you have anyway? could be its not good enough, get one with a decent fan and a copper base. I am assuming the HSF you have came with the system right?

    One thing to try is to pull a side cover off and see if this reduces the temps any, and even blow in with a desk fan and if the above makes a difference you need case fans installed.

    If your case temp is high, add some 12v~8cm case fans into the front to induce some fresh air and if you can install the same type of fan in the rear top of the case to extract the heated air. Its possible a space for one is there allready to mount that fan, and big cases are generally better.

    Try here at <A HREF="http://www.auspcmarket.com.au" target="_new">http://www.auspcmarket.com.au</A> for a good supplier of computer hardware that delivers Australia wide.
    If you need more help message me if you like...


    <font color=blue>Lizards</font color=blue> hide under rocks,<font color=red>Trolls</font color=red> hide under bridges & jump out to ruin posts<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by scotty3303 on 09/13/01 08:02 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
  3. Hey thanks for your help.

    I had the system built by the shop because I bought it mail order. I was *meant* to have a GeMT2 cooler but when I found some pics of this on the web they don't resemble what's installed in my system at all.

    The GeMT2 looks cylindrical with two fans, one at the bottom and one at the top.

    The HSF in my system has a square heatsink and fan. I called the shop (<A HREF="http://www.fortecomputers.com.au" target="_new">http://www.fortecomputers.com.au</A>) and they're sending me the correct cooler. They mentioned they may have accidently put a Duron HSF on my Athlon 1400. Could have been an expensive mistake!

    Slightly dissapointed in their service.

    Finn61
  4. yup.
    motto: never trust a salesman


    In memory of the 90+ Auzzies missing in the WTC disaster. An attack that has changed the world.
  5. Well, what I do is quite different from what most people do----but, it works beautifully!
    Firstly, I NEVER cover my system!! The cover is always off. I have a $10 Honeywell Super Turbo High Performance fan (HT 800 series) always running pointing directly at the MB/CPU area. The fan remains about 8" from the MB.
    My T-Bird 1.4 runs at 35-39 C. The MB runs at 28-30 C consistently.
    A side benefit is that the computer stays WAY cleaner than when I used to cover it! When I would open up a covered computer it often had TONS of dust all over it inside.
    I also only shut down my system once a week for 30 seconds. It's always running.
    Hope this is useful!
    Howard

    "We can do no great things, Only small things with Great Love"
    Mother Theresa
  6. Hey, you are way too far out of touch!
    Positive case pressure takes care of that dust problem, if ya cant run with the covers on your outa here! Listen and learn.
    Thats just down right lazyness, it ain't right, Preachin' crap like that, you need a" slappin' down boy!
    Reeal easy, just place a few hi-flow mutha's goin in, then have one sucker' removing that air, depends on if you have a decent psu! Got one of those baby's then removing air is just peachy.
  7. I think there is plenty of good advise here so good luck!
  8. Sorry...I disagree strongly from personal experience with 4 machines that have run both ways.
    I will stick with my bare PC case. It's been clean as a whistle for years. And you cannot possibly run cooler with a closed case and the same hardware/environmental conditions.
    Wanna keep yer case closed...fine. I won't criticize your choice . But don't tell me I am 'way out of touch' just because what I do is different from what you do.
    Have a good day!
    Howard

    "We can do no great things, Only small things with Great Love"
    Mother Theresa
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