Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

laptop with 2 hard drives?

Last response: in Computer Brands
Share
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 2:29:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)

*TimDaniels*

More about : laptop hard drives

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 5:59:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:
>Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
>hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
>for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)

Many Dell laptops support the D-Bay hard drive. I haven't tried
Ghosting my system disk to the D-Bay drive, but I'd imagine it would
work. The BIOS also supports booting from the D-Bay drive, FWIW.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 5:59:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<William P.N. Smith> wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
> >Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
> >hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
> >for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)
>
> Many Dell laptops support the D-Bay hard drive. I haven't tried
> Ghosting my system disk to the D-Bay drive, but I'd imagine it would
> work. The BIOS also supports booting from the D-Bay drive, FWIW.


Sounds encouraging. Is the "D-bay" usually used by other
storage devices (perhaps optical), or is it meant just for hard drives?

*TimDaniels*
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 9:55:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Does it support USB2? (If not, easy to add a USB2 PC Card, etc) ... I
would try Drive Image 7 with a laptop drive in an external USB2
enclosure (I use ADS Dual Links) ... that *should* create a bootable
image, but I have not tried it. [I have, however, moved desktop
drives in the Dual Link to an IDE channel with no problems - all
partitions, data, etc, remained accessible]

Timothy Daniels wrote:
> Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
> hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
> for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)
>
> *TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 14, 2004 10:10:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message news:<yI6dnVu-o_ftt9rcRVn-uQ@comcast.com>...
> Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
> hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
> for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)
>
> *TimDaniels*


A]
1)remove hard drive from laptop
2)insert laptop hard drive into desktop with special adapter (easy and
cheap to find)
3)clone drive

B]
1) use Norton Ghost (or similar)
2) send image to CD-RW or accross network
3) clone drive

C]
PROFIT!!!!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 12:11:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
news:yI6dnVu-o_ftt9rcRVn-uQ@comcast.com...
> Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
> hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
> for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)

Don't screw with that. The easy way to clone a laptop HD is on a desktop.
Just get an adapter(or two) and connect the laptop HD to a desktop's
standard EIDE cable.

FLT-3120
http://www.scsicablesource.com/images/flt-3120.jpg
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 2:44:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On 14 Sep 2004 18:10:22 -0700, returnoftheyeti@aol.com (the yeti) wrote:

>"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message news:<yI6dnVu-o_ftt9rcRVn-uQ@comcast.com>...
>> Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
>> hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
>> for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)
>>
>> *TimDaniels*
>
>
>A]
>1)remove hard drive from laptop
>2)insert laptop hard drive into desktop with special adapter (easy and
>cheap to find)
>3)clone drive
>
>B]
>1) use Norton Ghost (or similar)
>2) send image to CD-RW or accross network
>3) clone drive
>
>C]
>PROFIT!!!!

I bought a WD 160 GB External HD and backup my 5150 Laptop and
my XPS G2 via USB2 ports using Ghost.

Jack Mac
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 3:46:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ron Reaugh" wrote:
> The easy way to clone a laptop HD is on a desktop.
> Just get an adapter(or two) and connect the laptop
> HD to a desktop's standard EIDE cable.


So the adapter goes into what size bay of the
desktop?

So the procedure is to take the hard drive out
of the laptop, put it into the adapter in the desktop,
and 1) copy it to a desktop HD, or 2) copy it to another
laptop HD in another adapter inside the desktop?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 3:56:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Markeau" wrote:
> Does it support USB2? (If not, easy to add a USB2 PC Card, etc) ... I
> would try Drive Image 7 with a laptop drive in an external USB2
> enclosure (I use ADS Dual Links) ... that *should* create a bootable
> image, but I have not tried it. [I have, however, moved desktop
> drives in the Dual Link to an IDE channel with no problems - all
> partitions, data, etc, remained accessible]


So you would use the ADS Dual Link external laptop drive kit
(http://www.cwol.com/firewire-drives/ads-dual-link-drive...)
to use the laptop's USB2 channel to transfer the primary HD's
contents to the IDE laptop drive housed in the ADS external housing?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 4:09:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"the yeti" wrote:
> A]
> 1)remove hard drive from laptop
> 2)insert laptop hard drive into desktop with special adapter (easy and
> cheap to find)
> 3)clone drive


Clone the laptop drive to a partition on one of the desktop's drives
and then directly or indirectly back to a laptop drive?
If so, I would prefer something more direct, as in laptop drive to laptop
drive. Are there SATA drives for laptops, yet? Maybe one could
run a serial cable out to another laptop drive in an external housing?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 4:13:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Jack Mac" wrote:
> I bought a WD 160 GB External HD and backup my
> 5150 Laptop and my XPS G2 via USB2 ports using Ghost.

The recovery after primary hard drive failure would
involve.... what? How do you get the laptop running
again? What I'd like to do (in absence of having a 2nd
HD already in my laptop) is just pop a backup HD into
the laptop.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 4:50:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:
><William P.N. Smith> wrote:
>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>> >Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
>> >hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
>> >for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)

>> Many Dell laptops support the D-Bay hard drive. I haven't tried
>> Ghosting my system disk to the D-Bay drive, but I'd imagine it would
>> work. The BIOS also supports booting from the D-Bay drive, FWIW.

> Sounds encouraging. Is the "D-bay" usually used by other
>storage devices (perhaps optical), or is it meant just for hard drives?

We've got nearly the full set of D-Bay peripherals, floppy, hard
drive, CD writer, DVD writer, and extended battery. I think they also
make a Zip drive and LS-120, but I don' t have much use for either of
those. 8*)

Yeah, if all you want is to clone a particular drive once, there are
easier ways, but if you want to be able to back up your system, the
D-Bay hard drive is wonderful. Since the latest versions of Ghost can
write image files to NTFS partitions, you can have multiple hard drive
images on your D-Bay drive and still store extra files and such. Just
make a (DOS) bootable partition, put Ghost on it, and you are ready
for complete destruction of your internal hard drive! 8*)

The housing (4P124) is about $30, it requires five screws (7M490) at
50 cents each. There are four optional screws (5X488) to hold the
hard drive in place, but they are $5 (yow!) each, and the compression
fit of the drive in the bay is pretty good. Add any 9.5mm laptop hard
drive and you are all set.

You can buy the whole thing assembled with a 40G drive for $104 from
Dell's Small Business sales, but a 40G drive isn't nearly big enough
for what we needed. I put a spare 60G in my wife's and a spare 80G in
mine, and I'm anxiously awaiting the 100s and 120s!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 4:50:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<William P.N. Smith> wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
> Is the "D-bay" usually used by other storage devices
> (perhaps optical), or is it meant just for hard drives?
>
> We've got nearly the full set of D-Bay peripherals,
> floppy, hard drive, CD writer, DVD writer, and
> extended battery. I think they also make a Zip drive
> and LS-120, but I don' t have much use for either of
> those. 8*)


It sounds like the D-Bay is a generic peripheral
bay and using it for a 2nd hard drive precludes using
it for a CD-R/W. Is that true?

I imagine that I could use the D-Bay for a hard
drive just during the cloning process, but swapping
the other peripheral in and out and going through
the discovery by the OS of the change and loading
of the peripheral's driver could be a pain. What I'd
like to do is to make a clone hard drive for the laptop
so that I could just pop the clone in if the primary
hard drive should fail. (With my desktop, the 2nd
hard drive is always installed and ready to go.)


*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 7:12:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Three comments:

1. To clone a laptop hard drive means to clone it. If the original laptop drive
is the usual 2.5" type, so is the clone. TWO desktop adapters are needed for
cloning.

2. Though unlikely in this era of highly standardized BIOSes, it is possible
that the drive geometry(s) supported by a desktop BIOS are different than the
one used by the laptop. This could lead to one screwed up clone drive.

3. There is a MUCH easier way to clone a laptop drive. I did it last week to
get all the data from a failing 60GB drive inside a 3GHz Dell laptop onto a
replacement drive sent out by Dell to my client. Use a USB-IDE converter, and
attach the drive to be cloned to the laptop via its USB port. (In the unlikely
event that the laptop lacks a USB port, the same can be done with a PC Card-IDE
converter.)

The USB-IDE converter I bought came in a box marked "ALL PURPOSES SMART IDE
CONVERTER." You can bet from the brilliant syntax that the kit came from
Taiwan, which is what the box says. But the converter worked even more
brilliantly than the syntax, perfectly in fact. I don't think I paid more than
$30 for the USB-IDE converter on eBay.

I also used Seagate's SEATOOLS, which will clone any standard partition type
(FAT16, FAT32, or NTFS), but not oddball or hidden diagnostic partitions.

.... Ben Myers

On 14 Sep 2004 18:10:22 -0700, returnoftheyeti@aol.com (the yeti) wrote:

>"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message news:<yI6dnVu-o_ftt9rcRVn-uQ@comcast.com>...
>> Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
>> hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
>> for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)
>>
>> *TimDaniels*
>
>
>A]
>1)remove hard drive from laptop
>2)insert laptop hard drive into desktop with special adapter (easy and
>cheap to find)
>3)clone drive
>
>B]
>1) use Norton Ghost (or similar)
>2) send image to CD-RW or accross network
>3) clone drive
>
>C]
>PROFIT!!!!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 7:12:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<(Ben Myers)> wrote:
>
> 3. There is a MUCH easier way to clone a laptop drive.
> I did it last week to get all the data from a failing 60GB
> drive inside a 3GHz Dell laptop onto a replacement drive
> sent out by Dell to my client. Use a USB-IDE converter,
> and attach the drive to be cloned to the laptop via its USB
> port. (In the unlikely event that the laptop lacks a USB port,
> the same can be done with a PC Card-IDE converter.)
>
> The USB-IDE converter I bought came in a box marked
> "ALL PURPOSES SMART IDE CONVERTER." You
> can bet from the brilliant syntax that the kit came from Taiwan,
> which is what the box says. But the converter worked even
> more brilliantly than the syntax, perfectly in fact. I don't think
> I paid more than $30 for the USB-IDE converter on eBay.


Could you name the make and model of the USB/IDE
converter? Does it include an external housing?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 7:31:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4147b0b5.53739748@news.charter.net...
> Three comments:
>
> 1. To clone a laptop hard drive means to clone it. If the original laptop
drive
> is the usual 2.5" type, so is the clone. TWO desktop adapters are needed
for
> cloning.

Right, just like I said possibly two. But that's the harder way. Make an
image file of the laptop drive on the desktop HD and then restore that image
file to another laptop drive inserted into the same adapter.

> 2. Though unlikely in this era of highly standardized BIOSes, it is
possible
> that the drive geometry(s) supported by a desktop BIOS are different than
the
> one used by the laptop. This could lead to one screwed up clone drive.

VERY unlikely today.

> 3. There is a MUCH easier way to clone a laptop drive. I did it last week
to
> get all the data from a failing 60GB drive inside a 3GHz Dell laptop onto
a
> replacement drive sent out by Dell to my client. Use a USB-IDE converter,
and
> attach the drive to be cloned to the laptop via its USB port. (In the
unlikely
> event that the laptop lacks a USB port, the same can be done with a PC
Card-IDE
> converter.)

Although workable this technique is more likely to have some potholes than
the other.

> The USB-IDE converter I bought came in a box marked "ALL PURPOSES SMART
IDE
> CONVERTER." You can bet from the brilliant syntax that the kit came from
> Taiwan, which is what the box says. But the converter worked even more
> brilliantly than the syntax, perfectly in fact. I don't think I paid more
than
> $30 for the USB-IDE converter on eBay.
>
> I also used Seagate's SEATOOLS, which will clone any standard partition
type
> (FAT16, FAT32, or NTFS), but not oddball or hidden diagnostic partitions.
>
> ... Ben Myers
>
> On 14 Sep 2004 18:10:22 -0700, returnoftheyeti@aol.com (the yeti) wrote:
>
> >"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
news:<yI6dnVu-o_ftt9rcRVn-uQ@comcast.com>...
> >> Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
> >> hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
> >> for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)
> >>
> >> *TimDaniels*
> >
> >
> >A]
> >1)remove hard drive from laptop
> >2)insert laptop hard drive into desktop with special adapter (easy and
> >cheap to find)
> >3)clone drive
> >
> >B]
> >1) use Norton Ghost (or similar)
> >2) send image to CD-RW or accross network
> >3) clone drive
> >
> >C]
> >PROFIT!!!!
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 8:51:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

To get it straight in my head Ben, windows sees the external HD as just
another drive and I could clone (Drive Copy, Partition Magic etc) to that
drive. Sounds great.

Brian



> 3. There is a MUCH easier way to clone a laptop drive. I did it last week
> to
> get all the data from a failing 60GB drive inside a 3GHz Dell laptop onto
> a
> replacement drive sent out by Dell to my client. Use a USB-IDE converter,
> and
> attach the drive to be cloned to the laptop via its USB port. (In the
> unlikely
> event that the laptop lacks a USB port, the same can be done with a PC
> Card-IDE
> converter.)
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 10:59:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote in message
news:B9ednQOVYcfaeNrcRVn-ow@comcast.com...
> "Ron Reaugh" wrote:
> > The easy way to clone a laptop HD is on a desktop.
> > Just get an adapter(or two) and connect the laptop
> > HD to a desktop's standard EIDE cable.
>
>
> So the adapter goes into what size bay of the
> desktop?

Bay? It sits on your desk while doing the copy.

> So the procedure is to take the hard drive out
> of the laptop, put it into the adapter in the desktop,

Cable adapter...forget the mechanical adapter.

> and 1) copy it to a desktop HD, or 2) copy it to another
> laptop HD in another adapter inside the desktop?

No, the 2nd laptop HD would also sit on your desk while copying.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 11:13:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:
> It sounds like the D-Bay is a generic peripheral
>bay and using it for a 2nd hard drive precludes using
>it for a CD-R/W. Is that true?

Yes and mostly yes. You can swap them in one at a time unless you
have a D-Dock docking station, which has another D-Bay, and allows
three at a time. You can also use the D-Bay "Powered USB" connector
(USB plus extra power) to get another external D-Bay on some laptops
and the D-Dock and the "port replicator"

> I imagine that I could use the D-Bay for a hard
>drive just during the cloning process, but swapping
>the other peripheral in and out and going through
>the discovery by the OS of the change and loading
>of the peripheral's driver could be a pain.

Nope, just stop the one peripheral and plug in the other. Kinda like
USB, but with IDE.

>like to do is to make a clone hard drive for the laptop
>so that I could just pop the clone in if the primary
>hard drive should fail. (With my desktop, the 2nd
>hard drive is always installed and ready to go.)

You can do this if you don't mind booting from the D-Bay drive (or
doing the physical swap). Note that Win2K (and probably XP) don't
work well if you have both the system drive and it's mirror powered up
and in the system at the same time, so you'll want to remove the drive
after cloning it.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 11:44:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 00:13:42 -0700, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

>"Jack Mac" wrote:
>> I bought a WD 160 GB External HD and backup my
>> 5150 Laptop and my XPS G2 via USB2 ports using Ghost.
>
> The recovery after primary hard drive failure would
>involve.... what? How do you get the laptop running
>again?
1. Replace the failed HD in the laptop.
2. Boot the laptop using the Boot CD created by Ghost.
3. Plug the external HD into the USB2 port.
4. Restore the backed up files to the new internal HD.
The External USB2 HD permits me to back up more than
one computer.... not just my laptop.

What I'd like to do (in absence of having a 2nd
>HD already in my laptop) is just pop a backup HD into
>the laptop.
>
>*TimDaniels*
That could become involved if you do frequent
backups/clones. Guess it'd become easier after you've
done it a few times.

Jack Mac
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 2:41:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<William P.N. Smith> wrote:
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
> > It sounds like the D-Bay is a generic peripheral
> >bay and using it for a 2nd hard drive precludes using
> >it for a CD-R/W. Is that true?
>
> Yes and mostly yes. You can swap them in one at a time unless you
> have a D-Dock docking station, which has another D-Bay, and allows
> three at a time. You can also use the D-Bay "Powered USB" connector
> (USB plus extra power) to get another external D-Bay on some laptops
> and the D-Dock and the "port replicator"
>
> > I imagine that I could use the D-Bay for a hard
> >drive just during the cloning process, but swapping
> >the other peripheral in and out and going through
> >the discovery by the OS of the change and loading
> >of the peripheral's driver could be a pain.
>
> Nope, just stop the one peripheral and plug in the other. Kinda like
> USB, but with IDE.


Thanks. My mind is just now getting out of the desktop mode.


> >like to do is to make a clone hard drive for the laptop
> >so that I could just pop the clone in if the primary
> >hard drive should fail. (With my desktop, the 2nd
> >hard drive is always installed and ready to go.)
>
> You can do this if you don't mind booting from the D-Bay drive (or
> doing the physical swap). Note that Win2K (and probably XP) don't
> work well if you have both the system drive and it's mirror powered up
> and in the system at the same time, so you'll want to remove the drive
> after cloning it.


Is this specific to laptops? In my desktop, as long as the
new clone is powered up for the first time without the original HD
connected, subsequent boots have the "other systems" (i.e. the
ones that weren't booted) as just other "local disks" with their file
systems fully visible and accessible for reads and writes. And
with the boot.ini file in the HD that is selected by the BIOS
pointing to all the bootable partitions on both of the HDs, I
can select which partition boots using Win XP's multi-boot
feature. I had assumed one could do this with a laptop, too.
Not true?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 2:43:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

In article <np-dnXO4t4VeftrcRVn-jA@comcast.com>, TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com
(Timothy Daniels) says...

> It sounds like the D-Bay is a generic peripheral
> bay and using it for a 2nd hard drive precludes using
> it for a CD-R/W. Is that true?

A D-Bay drive just plugs into the USB port. Accessory drives even ship
with a USB cable so you don't have to install them in the computer to
use them.

You can get the same functionality using any external USB or FireWire
hard drive.

--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 2:43:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Larry Caldwell" wrote:
> A D-Bay drive just plugs into the USB port. Accessory drives even ship
> with a USB cable so you don't have to install them in the computer to
> use them.
>
> You can get the same functionality using any external USB or FireWire
> hard drive.


Thanks. I had pictured a D-Bay as an unused bay in the laptop.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 2:46:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ron Reaugh" wrote:
>
> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
> > "Ron Reaugh" wrote:
> > > The easy way to clone a laptop HD is on a desktop.
> > > Just get an adapter(or two) and connect the laptop
> > > HD to a desktop's standard EIDE cable.
> >
> >
> > So the adapter goes into what size bay of the
> > desktop?
>
> Bay? It sits on your desk while doing the copy.


OK. I was picturing an "adapter" as being a pair of
adapter *brackets* or a removable tray that allows one
to put a laptop HD in a desktop. Apparently, cooling is
adequate for a laptop HD just sitting on a desk - no
fan blowing on it necessary?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 7:57:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Yes, you've got it right, assuming that the operating system has respectable USB
support, namely Windows 2000 or some flavor of Windows XP, which is my
assumption in making the following suggestions.

Make sure your cloning software marks the clone drive's Windows partition as
bootable.

On a fairly contemporary Dell notebook (and others as well), make sure you copy
the hidden diagnostic partition first, so you'll need a commercial product to do
so.

If you don't copy the diagnostic partition at all, you'll need to edit the boot
disk info to refer to partition 1 (Windows NT systems count partition numbers up
beginning with 1) rather than partition 2... Ben Myers

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 04:51:11 GMT, "Brian K" <iibntgyea4_
remove_this_@hotmail.com> wrote:

>To get it straight in my head Ben, windows sees the external HD as just
>another drive and I could clone (Drive Copy, Partition Magic etc) to that
>drive. Sounds great.
>
>Brian
>
>
>
>> 3. There is a MUCH easier way to clone a laptop drive. I did it last week
>> to
>> get all the data from a failing 60GB drive inside a 3GHz Dell laptop onto
>> a
>> replacement drive sent out by Dell to my client. Use a USB-IDE converter,
>> and
>> attach the drive to be cloned to the laptop via its USB port. (In the
>> unlikely
>> event that the laptop lacks a USB port, the same can be done with a PC
>> Card-IDE
>> converter.)
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 8:04:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Tim,

I wish I could give you a brand name for the USB-IDE converter I use, but its
yet another one of those stupid anonymous Taiwanese companies that do not put
their brand name on their products, because they don't want to be bothered (or
are linguistically unable) to support the product. This company ends up
screwing itself, because it has a neat all-purpose product and no brand-name
recognition.

The box is light blue with splashy graphics. The kit does include an external
2.5" drive housing plus adapters for 44-pin notebook standard drives and 40-pin
desktop drives (hard drive, CD-ROM, CD-RW, DVD-R, DVD-RW).

To clone a drive, I do not bother to put the drive in the external housing. It
is not necessary. But it would be a good idea for more permanent use as an
external drive... Ben Myers

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 00:20:06 -0700, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

><(Ben Myers)> wrote:
>>
>> 3. There is a MUCH easier way to clone a laptop drive.
>> I did it last week to get all the data from a failing 60GB
>> drive inside a 3GHz Dell laptop onto a replacement drive
>> sent out by Dell to my client. Use a USB-IDE converter,
>> and attach the drive to be cloned to the laptop via its USB
>> port. (In the unlikely event that the laptop lacks a USB port,
>> the same can be done with a PC Card-IDE converter.)
>>
>> The USB-IDE converter I bought came in a box marked
>> "ALL PURPOSES SMART IDE CONVERTER." You
>> can bet from the brilliant syntax that the kit came from Taiwan,
>> which is what the box says. But the converter worked even
>> more brilliantly than the syntax, perfectly in fact. I don't think
>> I paid more than $30 for the USB-IDE converter on eBay.
>
>
> Could you name the make and model of the USB/IDE
>converter? Does it include an external housing?
>
>*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 8:04:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote:
> I wish I could give you a brand name for the USB-IDE converter I use, but its
> yet another one of those stupid anonymous Taiwanese companies that do not put
> their brand name on their products, because they don't want to be bothered (or
> are linguistically unable) to support the product. This company ends up
> screwing itself, because it has a neat all-purpose product and no brand-name
> recognition.


I strongly suspect the same manufacturer sells the same product
to various other "manufacturers" in boxes having having the other
"manufacturer's" names. The same thing seems to be done with
round cables and fans and drive caddies and other after-market
homebuilder and hobbyist hardware.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 8:08:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 03:31:50 GMT, "Ron Reaugh" <rondashreaugh@att.net> wrote:
<SNIPS inserted>
>
>> 2. Though unlikely in this era of highly standardized BIOSes, it is
>possible
>> that the drive geometry(s) supported by a desktop BIOS are different than
>the
>> one used by the laptop. This could lead to one screwed up clone drive.
>
>VERY unlikely today.
>

True. VERY unlikely today. But then, why roll the dice when there is a
guaranteed 100% solution to the problem as stated by the OP.

>> 3. There is a MUCH easier way to clone a laptop drive. I did it last week
>to
>> get all the data from a failing 60GB drive inside a 3GHz Dell laptop onto
>a
>> replacement drive sent out by Dell to my client. Use a USB-IDE converter,
>and
>> attach the drive to be cloned to the laptop via its USB port. (In the
>unlikely
>> event that the laptop lacks a USB port, the same can be done with a PC
>Card-IDE
>> converter.)
>
>Although workable this technique is more likely to have some potholes than
>the other.
>

The potholes being???? How about some definite information based on real-life
experience???? I agree that if I was driving down the road and hit a pothole
while cloning the drive with my notebook plugged into the car's cigarette
lighter, THAT would be a pothole to avoid... Ben Myers
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 15, 2004 10:10:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Timothy Daniels wrote:
> "Markeau" wrote:
>> Does it support USB2? (If not, easy to add a USB2 PC Card, etc) ...
>> I
>> would try Drive Image 7 with a laptop drive in an external USB2
>> enclosure (I use ADS Dual Links) ... that *should* create a
>> bootable
>> image, but I have not tried it. [I have, however, moved desktop
>> drives in the Dual Link to an IDE channel with no problems - all
>> partitions, data, etc, remained accessible]
>
>
> So you would use the ADS Dual Link external laptop drive kit
> (http://www.cwol.com/firewire-drives/ads-dual-link-drive...)
> to use the laptop's USB2 channel to transfer the primary HD's
> contents to the IDE laptop drive housed in the ADS external housing?

Right ... you would probably also need to get the 2.5"-to-3.5" cable
adapter and adapter brackets when putting the laptop drive in the
DualLink

This place has some adapters plus the first item looks like exactly
what you were looking for:
http://www.baber.com/drives/internal_hard_drives/laptop...
http://www.cablesnmor.com/hard-drive-converter.html
September 16, 2004 6:47:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

William P.N. Smith wrote:

> "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:
>
>><William P.N. Smith> wrote:
>>
>>>"Timothy Daniels" wrote:
>>>
>>>>Do any of the Dell laptops provide 2 bays for
>>>>hard drives like the desktops do? (I'm looking
>>>>for an easy way to clone a laptop hard drive.)
>
>>>Many Dell laptops support the D-Bay hard drive. I haven't tried
>>>Ghosting my system disk to the D-Bay drive, but I'd imagine it would
>>>work. The BIOS also supports booting from the D-Bay drive, FWIW.
>
>> Sounds encouraging. Is the "D-bay" usually used by other
>>storage devices (perhaps optical), or is it meant just for hard drives?
>
> We've got nearly the full set of D-Bay peripherals, floppy, hard
> drive, CD writer, DVD writer, and extended battery. I think they also
> make a Zip drive and LS-120, but I don' t have much use for either of
> those. 8*)
>
> Yeah, if all you want is to clone a particular drive once, there are
> easier ways, but if you want to be able to back up your system, the
> D-Bay hard drive is wonderful. Since the latest versions of Ghost can
> write image files to NTFS partitions, you can have multiple hard drive
> images on your D-Bay drive and still store extra files and such. Just
> make a (DOS) bootable partition, put Ghost on it, and you are ready
> for complete destruction of your internal hard drive! 8*)
>
> The housing (4P124) is about $30, it requires five screws (7M490) at
> 50 cents each. There are four optional screws (5X488) to hold the
> hard drive in place, but they are $5 (yow!) each, and the compression
> fit of the drive in the bay is pretty good. Add any 9.5mm laptop hard
> drive and you are all set.
>
> You can buy the whole thing assembled with a 40G drive for $104 from
> Dell's Small Business sales, but a 40G drive isn't nearly big enough
> for what we needed. I put a spare 60G in my wife's and a spare 80G in
> mine, and I'm anxiously awaiting the 100s and 120s!

This sounds both complicated & expensive. My IBM ThinkPad has an
"Ultrabay", integral with the unit, which takes a variety of peripherals
(it came with a DVD/CD-RW unit). I bought a HDD Ultrabay adapter for
$45, which works great.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 6:47:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Sparky" wrote:
> My IBM ThinkPad has an "Ultrabay", integral with the unit,
> which takes a variety of peripherals (it came with a
> DVD/CD-RW unit). I bought a HDD Ultrabay adapter
> for $45, which works great.

As I interpret your description, there is a slot in the
Thinkpad which accomodates an adapter and a laptop
hard drive, and the adapter converts between USB2
and EIDE. Is that right? Is the adapter an IBM
product or 3rd party?

*TimDaniels*
September 16, 2004 12:40:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Timothy Daniels wrote:

> "Sparky" wrote:
>
>>My IBM ThinkPad has an "Ultrabay", integral with the unit,
>>which takes a variety of peripherals (it came with a
>>DVD/CD-RW unit). I bought a HDD Ultrabay adapter
>>for $45, which works great.
>
>
> As I interpret your description, there is a slot in the
> Thinkpad which accomodates an adapter and a laptop
> hard drive, and the adapter converts between USB2
> and EIDE. Is that right? Is the adapter an IBM
> product or 3rd party?

Adapter's made (marketed, anyway) by IBM, no USB involved - it's an
internal EIDE device, just like the DVD drive. This is what I bought for
my R40:

http://www-132.ibm.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Produc...

It works great - it's funny at first to have 2 HDDs in a laptop, but
cloning the C: HDD is a snap, of course.
September 16, 2004 12:52:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Timothy Daniels wrote:

> "Sparky" wrote:
>
>>My IBM ThinkPad has an "Ultrabay", integral with the unit,
>>which takes a variety of peripherals (it came with a
>>DVD/CD-RW unit). I bought a HDD Ultrabay adapter
>>for $45, which works great.
>
> As I interpret your description, there is a slot in the
> Thinkpad which accomodates an adapter and a laptop
> hard drive,

Right, it's much like the bay for the battery and one of the
possibilities for the Ultrabay is for a 2nd battery to maximize
computing time while on battery.

2nd battery:

http://www-132.ibm.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Produc...

View of Ultrabay:

http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?...

> and the adapter converts between USB2
> and EIDE. Is that right? Is the adapter an IBM
> product or 3rd party?

It's also possible to put any HDD in an external case & use it as a USB
device (be sure to have USB2 on your laptop). No need in this case to
use a 2.5" HDD - both the drives & cases are more expensive. The 3.5"
HDDs & cases are pretty inexpensive.

The 2nd HDD in your laptop is ideal, of course, if you want to upgrade
the laptop to a bigger HDD.
September 16, 2004 12:56:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Brian K wrote:

> To get it straight in my head Ben, windows sees the external HD as just
> another drive and I could clone (Drive Copy, Partition Magic etc) to that
> drive. Sounds great.

It is, but it depends on Ghost / Partition Magic / etc. supporting a
USB2 device. With Ghost2003 you have to configure it to include the USB2
drivers - not a big deal, but if you don't do it, you're in for a very
frustrating time because Ghost won't see the USB HDD.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 1:56:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

In article <Z9Wdnaya0oZW59XcRVn-jQ@comcast.com>, TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com
(Timothy Daniels) says...
> "Larry Caldwell" wrote:
> > A D-Bay drive just plugs into the USB port. Accessory drives even ship
> > with a USB cable so you don't have to install them in the computer to
> > use them.
> >
> > You can get the same functionality using any external USB or FireWire
> > hard drive.

Dell does sell modular drives that install in the modular bay of
notebook computers. They are also USB drives, and can be used
externally to the computer.

--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 2:57:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Sparky" wrote:
> >>My IBM ThinkPad has an "Ultrabay", integral with the unit,
> >>which takes a variety of peripherals (it came with a
> >>DVD/CD-RW unit). I bought a HDD Ultrabay adapter
> >>for $45, which works great.
> >
>
> Adapter's made (marketed, anyway) by IBM, no USB involved -
> it's an internal EIDE device, just like the DVD drive. This is what
> I bought for my R40:
>
> http://www-132.ibm.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Produc...
>
> It works great - it's funny at first to have 2 HDDs in a laptop, but
> cloning the C: HDD is a snap, of course.


That's just what I'm looking for! Do you know if the equivalent
can be found in other makes of laptop PCs?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 3:55:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Timothy Daniels wrote:
> "the yeti" wrote:
>> A]
>> 1)remove hard drive from laptop
>> 2)insert laptop hard drive into desktop with special adapter (easy
>> and cheap to find)
>> 3)clone drive
>
>
> Clone the laptop drive to a partition on one of the desktop's
> drives and then directly or indirectly back to a laptop drive?
> If so, I would prefer something more direct, as in laptop drive to
> laptop drive. Are there SATA drives for laptops, yet? Maybe one
> could
> run a serial cable out to another laptop drive in an external
> housing?

See the first item at link below ...
http://www.baber.com/drives/internal_hard_drives/laptop...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 16, 2004 3:55:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Markeau" wrote:
> Timothy Daniels wrote:
> > I would prefer something more direct, as in laptop drive to
> > laptop drive. Are there SATA drives for laptops, yet?
> > Maybe one could run a serial cable out to another laptop
> > drive in an external housing?
>
> See the first item at link below ...
> http://www.baber.com/drives/internal_hard_drives/laptop...


Do you know if that involves a USB interface? The neat thing about
the IMB Ultrabay is that it doesn't involve USB (that I know of).

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 1:09:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

The $149 kit from baber states very clearly that it uses a PCMCIA card which
provides the access to an IDE notebook drive hooked up to it. The pros and cons
for this approach are about the same as for a USB-IDE converter kit. The price
seems high, but, then, I guess I don't know how much a copy of Ghost costs,
either.

As for SATA on a notebook computer, not yet. Possibly in a year or two. The
speed advantage of SATA is outweighed by the extra heat generated by fast
spinning SATA drives... Ben Myers

On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 11:26:03 -0700, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

>"Markeau" wrote:
>> Timothy Daniels wrote:
>> > I would prefer something more direct, as in laptop drive to
>> > laptop drive. Are there SATA drives for laptops, yet?
>> > Maybe one could run a serial cable out to another laptop
>> > drive in an external housing?
>>
>> See the first item at link below ...
>> http://www.baber.com/drives/internal_hard_drives/laptop...
>
>
> Do you know if that involves a USB interface? The neat thing about
>the IMB Ultrabay is that it doesn't involve USB (that I know of).
>
>*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 1:09:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:

>The $149 kit from baber states very clearly that it uses a PCMCIA card which
>provides the access to an IDE notebook drive hooked up to it. The pros and cons
>for this approach are about the same as for a USB-IDE converter kit. The price
>seems high, but, then, I guess I don't know how much a copy of Ghost costs,
>either.

$70. FWIW, it's a single computer license, so the "send it back when
you're done" thing isn't strictly legal.

>As for SATA on a notebook computer, not yet. Possibly in a year or two. The
>speed advantage of SATA is outweighed by the extra heat generated by fast
>spinning SATA drives... Ben Myers

You could have a 3600RPM drive with a SATA interface, and the FD
bearings on higher (rotational) speed drives make them pretty
low-power. SATA gets you higher-speed interfaces (which laptops can't
currently take advantage of), ease of cabling (which isn't a laptop
problem), and (eventually) hot-swap capabilities (which already exists
in laptops with removable bay drives).

SATA laptop drives are going to be a chicken/egg thing, as no laptop
mfr is going to pay lots extra for the drives, and the drives aren't
going to be lowcost till everyone uses them.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 1:09:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

(Ben Myers)> wrote:
> The $149 kit from baber states very clearly that it uses a PCMCIA card which
> provides the access to an IDE notebook drive hooked up to it. The pros and cons
> for this approach are about the same as for a USB-IDE converter kit. The price
> seems high, but, then, I guess I don't know how much a copy of Ghost costs,
> either.

Ghost 9 costs $70, but since I already have Drive Image 7, any cost for
cloning software is excessive. It's good to know, though, that there are
several approaches to meet the need.

*TimDaniels*
September 17, 2004 3:27:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Timothy Daniels wrote:
> "Sparky" wrote:
>
>>>>My IBM ThinkPad has an "Ultrabay", integral with the unit,
>>>>which takes a variety of peripherals (it came with a
>>>>DVD/CD-RW unit). I bought a HDD Ultrabay adapter
>>>>for $45, which works great.
>>>
>>Adapter's made (marketed, anyway) by IBM, no USB involved -
>>it's an internal EIDE device, just like the DVD drive. This is what
>>I bought for my R40:
>>
>>http://www-132.ibm.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Produc...
>>
>>It works great - it's funny at first to have 2 HDDs in a laptop, but
>>cloning the C: HDD is a snap, of course.
>
> That's just what I'm looking for! Do you know if the equivalent
> can be found in other makes of laptop PCs?

Looks as though Dell offers it for at least some of their laptops.

http://www2.shopping.com/xPF-Dell_Dell_Inspiron_Latitud...

http://www.dealtime.com/xPO-Dell_48CVX_Dell_Hard_Drive_...

http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/ProductDetail.aspx?s...

Do they have Google in your area? ;) 
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 3:27:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Sparky" wrote:
> Timothy Daniels wrote:
> > That's just what I'm looking for! Do you know if the equivalent
> > can be found in other makes of laptop PCs?
>
> Looks as though Dell offers it for at least some of their laptops.
>
> http://www2.shopping.com/xPF-Dell_Dell_Inspiron_Latitud...
>
> http://www.dealtime.com/xPO-Dell_48CVX_Dell_Hard_Drive_...
>
>
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/ProductDetail.aspx?s...
>
> Do they have Google in your area? ;) 

Thanks for the links. Yes, Dell appears to have the equivalent of the
IMB Ultrabay. I didn't try Google because I didn't know what terms
to search with - "ultrabay equivalent" just didn't seem to the right terms.
I'll go check out Sony, now, since I can get 40% discounts on Sony
equipment.

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 4:41:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Since the push to SATA is for speed, speed and more speed, a 3600 rpm SATA could
be designed and built. But it would seem to be an oxymoron. No sense having a
fast bus to transfer data from drive to memory when the drive itself can't feed
data at anywhere near bus speeds. Of course, with a high enough track density,
the transfer rate of even a 3600 rpm drive could be improved... Ben Myers

On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 17:38:59 -0400, William P.N. Smith wrote:

>ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
>
>>The $149 kit from baber states very clearly that it uses a PCMCIA card which
>>provides the access to an IDE notebook drive hooked up to it. The pros and cons
>>for this approach are about the same as for a USB-IDE converter kit. The price
>>seems high, but, then, I guess I don't know how much a copy of Ghost costs,
>>either.
>
>$70. FWIW, it's a single computer license, so the "send it back when
>you're done" thing isn't strictly legal.
>
>>As for SATA on a notebook computer, not yet. Possibly in a year or two. The
>>speed advantage of SATA is outweighed by the extra heat generated by fast
>>spinning SATA drives... Ben Myers
>
>You could have a 3600RPM drive with a SATA interface, and the FD
>bearings on higher (rotational) speed drives make them pretty
>low-power. SATA gets you higher-speed interfaces (which laptops can't
>currently take advantage of), ease of cabling (which isn't a laptop
>problem), and (eventually) hot-swap capabilities (which already exists
>in laptops with removable bay drives).
>
>SATA laptop drives are going to be a chicken/egg thing, as no laptop
>mfr is going to pay lots extra for the drives, and the drives aren't
>going to be lowcost till everyone uses them.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 6:46:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I encourage you to check on eBay. There are literally hundreds of various
USB-IDE kits up for auction, many for reasonable prices. Also USB cases to hold
notebook drives, in the event that one wants to keep a drive somewhat
permanently in a USB case... Ben Myers

On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 18:55:52 -0700, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

>(Ben Myers)> wrote:
>> The $149 kit from baber states very clearly that it uses a PCMCIA card which
>> provides the access to an IDE notebook drive hooked up to it. The pros and cons
>> for this approach are about the same as for a USB-IDE converter kit. The price
>> seems high, but, then, I guess I don't know how much a copy of Ghost costs,
>> either.
>
>Ghost 9 costs $70, but since I already have Drive Image 7, any cost for
>cloning software is excessive. It's good to know, though, that there are
>several approaches to meet the need.
>
>*TimDaniels*
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 17, 2004 2:36:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

(Ben Myers)> wrote:
> I encourage you to check on eBay. There are literally hundreds of various
> USB-IDE kits up for auction, many for reasonable prices. Also USB
> cases to hold notebook drives, in the event that one wants to keep a drive
> somewhat permanently in a USB case...

I feel another epic search coming on.... :-) Just selecting which
removable caddy to use for my desktop took months!

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 18, 2004 12:24:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com> wrote:
> I feel another epic search coming on.... :-) Just selecting which
>removable caddy to use for my desktop took months!

I'm a bit confused as to what you want. If your laptop drive fails,
do you want to be able to boot off the spare, replace the main drive
and copy your image back, or what? All of these options and more have
been suggested, but you don't seem to like any of them...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 18, 2004 3:25:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<William P.N. Smith> wrote:
> I'm a bit confused as to what you want. If your laptop drive fails,
> do you want to be able to boot off the spare, replace the main drive
> and copy your image back, or what? All of these options and more have
> been suggested, but you don't seem to like any of them...


Ideally, I'd like to boot up from a 2nd internal HD, just as I can
do now with my desktop. Absent a 2nd internal HD, I'd like to
swap HDs using a spare that I can easily reach. To keep cloning
an easy and fast process and to not slow down the system if it's
running off a clone, I'd prefer a straight IDE transfer without
going through a USB or FireWire conversion. I do NOT want to
have to re-copy a system from an archive HD floating about in an
external enclosure with wires trailing out of it that run to an adapter.
I do NOT want to have to use the booted system with an external
HD connected by wires, etc. In other words, I'd like to be able
travel light and clean, and if a HD should fail, do a swap and
maintain the ease of demo-ing software that communicates between
apps running on two different laptops without the confusion and
delay of untangling and laying out wires and external peripherals,
all the while maintaining a client or a job interview rap.

As I see it, the closest I might be able to get is to have an
Ultrabay-like device for making clones, and accept having to
open the laptop in the field to swap HDs in the event of a failure.
BTW, how hard is swapping laptop HDs in the field?

*TimDaniels*
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 19, 2004 1:42:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 11:25:36 -0700, "Timothy Daniels" <TDaniels@NoSpamDot.com>
wrote:

><William P.N. Smith> wrote:
>> I'm a bit confused as to what you want. If your laptop drive fails,
>> do you want to be able to boot off the spare, replace the main drive
>> and copy your image back, or what? All of these options and more have
>> been suggested, but you don't seem to like any of them...
>
>
> Ideally, I'd like to boot up from a 2nd internal HD, just as I can
>do now with my desktop. Absent a 2nd internal HD, I'd like to
>swap HDs using a spare that I can easily reach. To keep cloning
>an easy and fast process and to not slow down the system if it's
>running off a clone, I'd prefer a straight IDE transfer without
>going through a USB or FireWire conversion. I do NOT want to
>have to re-copy a system from an archive HD floating about in an
>external enclosure with wires trailing out of it that run to an adapter.
>I do NOT want to have to use the booted system with an external
>HD connected by wires, etc. In other words, I'd like to be able
>travel light and clean, and if a HD should fail, do a swap and
>maintain the ease of demo-ing software that communicates between
>apps running on two different laptops without the confusion and
>delay of untangling and laying out wires and external peripherals,
>all the while maintaining a client or a job interview rap.
>
> As I see it, the closest I might be able to get is to have an
>Ultrabay-like device for making clones, and accept having to
>open the laptop in the field to swap HDs in the event of a failure.
>BTW, how hard is swapping laptop HDs in the field?
>
>*TimDaniels*

You've laid out some stringent requirements which may be difficult to meet given
current and near-future notebook technology. The best you can do is either an
UltraBay device or a USB2-IDE converter kit, the latter consisting of a small
drive enclosure and the necessary cables and adapters to attach the drive to a
USB 2.0 port, which I hope your notebook computer has. USB 2.0 will sustain
disk transfer rates comparable to those of a drive inside the notebook. USB 1.1
and earlier definitely will not. You can use the USB2-IDE converter kit to
clone the drive. If you need to boot the system from the clone accessed thru a
USB port, your notebook must also be capable of booting from the USB drive.

Swapping of drives in the field is not difficult at all, provided you carry the
right tools. Most notebook computer drives can be accessed with a small Philips
head screwdriver. Examine yours to see what tools you need. Swapping drives is
quicker and easier if you have an extra drive caddy for the second drive.
Otherwise you have to remove the drive/caddy from the system, remove the drive
from the caddy (usually 4 screws), put the replacement drive in the caddy, and
put the replacement drive/caddy back inside the notebook.

Firewire is an acceptable alternative to USB, tho not as popular on Intel
computers as on Macs. Firewire is just as fast or faster than USB, depending on
the devices hooked up to it. If your notebook can boot from a hard drive
attached to its presumed firewire port, then you can do everything with Firewire
that can be done with a notebook bootable from USB... Ben Myers
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
September 19, 2004 1:42:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

(Ben Myers)> wrote:
> You've laid out some stringent requirements which may be difficult to meet given
> current and near-future notebook technology. The best you can do is either an
> UltraBay device or a USB2-IDE converter kit, the latter consisting of a small
> drive enclosure and the necessary cables and adapters to attach the drive to a
> USB 2.0 port, which I hope your notebook computer has. USB 2.0 will sustain
> disk transfer rates comparable to those of a drive inside the notebook. USB 1.1
> and earlier definitely will not. You can use the USB2-IDE converter kit to
> clone the drive. If you need to boot the system from the clone accessed thru a
> USB port, your notebook must also be capable of booting from the USB drive.
>
> Swapping of drives in the field is not difficult at all, provided you carry the
> right tools. Most notebook computer drives can be accessed with a small Philips
> head screwdriver. Examine yours to see what tools you need. Swapping drives is
> quicker and easier if you have an extra drive caddy for the second drive.
> Otherwise you have to remove the drive/caddy from the system, remove the drive
> from the caddy (usually 4 screws), put the replacement drive in the caddy, and
> put the replacement drive/caddy back inside the notebook.
>
> Firewire is an acceptable alternative to USB, tho not as popular on Intel
> computers as on Macs. Firewire is just as fast or faster than USB, depending on
> the devices hooked up to it. If your notebook can boot from a hard drive
> attached to its presumed firewire port, then you can do everything with Firewire
> that can be done with a notebook bootable from USB...

Thanks for the info, Ben. For the record, I don't have a laptop now,
but I shall be in the market for two (2) identical laptops in a few months,
and I was investigating the HD backup availabilities. I know that there may
be no system that meets my entire list of "druthers", but it's good to learn
what devices come closest. Thanks, again.

*TimDaniels*
!