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dell compnents

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September 15, 2004 2:51:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I'm thinking about buying myself a Dell PC.
Talking with people, the concern ws raised that Dell might use custom
components for the power supply, DVD burners and so no, which would
make difficult and xpensive the replacement and/or upgrade.
Does anybody could tell me anything about it?

thanks in advance and greetings,
Mario

More about : dell compnents

September 15, 2004 2:51:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I believe Dell uses oem parts for the MB power supply, and video cards.
The other items like DVD burners, modem, video cards and HD can be changed .
You just have to select a system that will give you the upgradeability you
need.

"Jaden" <kknave@tin.it> wrote in message
news:8cmek0luf98636it08ce2scq0e247suhs0@4ax.com...
> I'm thinking about buying myself a Dell PC.
> Talking with people, the concern ws raised that Dell might use custom
> components for the power supply, DVD burners and so no, which would
> make difficult and xpensive the replacement and/or upgrade.
> Does anybody could tell me anything about it?
>
> thanks in advance and greetings,
> Mario
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 15, 2004 2:51:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Like every other major OEM, Dell uses some proprietary parts in their
computers. If you want a computer built entirely from retail parts, I'm
afraid you're going to have to build it yourself.

That said, Dell computers (at least, the ones targetted at home and small
business users) are easy to upgrade if we're talking about the upgrades that
users commonly do. Dell makes it easy to add cards, RAM and drives. They may
have arranged it this way to avoid the cost of sending out a technician.
Even a klutz like me was able to add hard disks and optical disks.

But if you want to upgrade the power supply or the case fan or the
motherboard, for example, you've got to buy the part from Dell.
--
Ted Zieglar


"Jaden" <kknave@tin.it> wrote in message
news:8cmek0luf98636it08ce2scq0e247suhs0@4ax.com...
> I'm thinking about buying myself a Dell PC.
> Talking with people, the concern ws raised that Dell might use custom
> components for the power supply, DVD burners and so no, which would
> make difficult and xpensive the replacement and/or upgrade.
> Does anybody could tell me anything about it?
>
> thanks in advance and greetings,
> Mario
Related resources
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 15, 2004 2:51:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Jaden" <kknave@tin.it> wrote in message
news:8cmek0luf98636it08ce2scq0e247suhs0@4ax.com...
> I'm thinking about buying myself a Dell PC.
> Talking with people, the concern ws raised that Dell might use custom
> components for the power supply, DVD burners and so no, which would
> make difficult and xpensive the replacement and/or upgrade.
> Does anybody could tell me anything about it?
>
This depends on what you consider 'proprietary' and which Dell model you
refer to.
The Dimension 8300/8400 use standard OEM parts with the exception of case
and motherboard (Intel Board). The only big thing on the case is the
connector for the pinheaders on the motherboard for the lights, switches
etc.
September 16, 2004 11:54:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Jaden <kknave@tin.it> wrote:
> I'm thinking about buying myself a Dell PC.
> Talking with people, the concern ws raised that Dell might use custom
> components for the power supply, DVD burners and so no, which would
> make difficult and xpensive the replacement and/or upgrade.
> Does anybody could tell me anything about it?

> thanks in advance and greetings,
> Mario

I bought a 4550 and immediately fdisk'ed it (about standard for me).
It had a Radeon 9000 AIW video card and a SB Live! sound card. Dell
alone provides drivers. And they weren't easy to find. It was a
pain in the ass actually to update the system to current drivers
and wipe out all the factory trash.

Proprietary = poor choice of drivers. Usually not a big deal, but
it can affect Linux installs, BeOS (dear God) installs, and the like.
You'd have to be an uber nerd to get bitten, otherwise the proprietary
drivers are just an annoyance.

I'm completely on the fence for buying from big company versus building.
I've done both many times. I usually build specialized systems (video
editting) and buy generic systems (kids school work).

I wouldn't worry too much about upgrading. It's a gamble, but
you stand a good chance of the hardware lasting the life of the
system. Minor upgrades won't be affected by the proprietary
MB and case. So it's not a big issue.

Don't buy local. I used to work at a PC Club like shop. Not pretty.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 17, 2004 1:14:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I would claim that the Dell drivers are not proprietary at all, because the
cards are either the same as generic retail cards or they are detuned (either
less memory or slower RAMDAC or both) versions which use the manufacturer's
standard off-the-shelf drivers. The challenge, as always, is to identify which
drivers go with a card. Most often, determining the chipset is the clue to
which drivers to install.

Other than the admittedly proprietary motherboards with unusual connectors mated
to slightly oddball Dell cases, even Dell cannot afford to have a manufacturer
build proprietary hardware. Proprietary equates to higher manufacturing costs
and may cost a bundle for the drivers to support a product. In this age of
sub-$400 entry-level computers, nobody can afford the added costs of
proprietary. (High-end servers are another story. So far.)... Ben Myers

On 16 Sep 2004 19:54:05 GMT, Brian <brian@nospam.edu> wrote:

>Jaden <kknave@tin.it> wrote:
>> I'm thinking about buying myself a Dell PC.
>> Talking with people, the concern ws raised that Dell might use custom
>> components for the power supply, DVD burners and so no, which would
>> make difficult and xpensive the replacement and/or upgrade.
>> Does anybody could tell me anything about it?
>
>> thanks in advance and greetings,
>> Mario
>
>I bought a 4550 and immediately fdisk'ed it (about standard for me).
>It had a Radeon 9000 AIW video card and a SB Live! sound card. Dell
>alone provides drivers. And they weren't easy to find. It was a
>pain in the ass actually to update the system to current drivers
>and wipe out all the factory trash.
>
>Proprietary = poor choice of drivers. Usually not a big deal, but
>it can affect Linux installs, BeOS (dear God) installs, and the like.
>You'd have to be an uber nerd to get bitten, otherwise the proprietary
>drivers are just an annoyance.
>
>I'm completely on the fence for buying from big company versus building.
>I've done both many times. I usually build specialized systems (video
>editting) and buy generic systems (kids school work).
>
>I wouldn't worry too much about upgrading. It's a gamble, but
>you stand a good chance of the hardware lasting the life of the
>system. Minor upgrades won't be affected by the proprietary
>MB and case. So it's not a big issue.
>
>Don't buy local. I used to work at a PC Club like shop. Not pretty.
>
>
!