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My son's first character

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Anonymous
April 12, 2005 3:09:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

My 4-year-old son made up his first D&D character tonight, and played
through his first little adventure. After rolling and adding his stats
(11, 11, 12, 12, 17, 17), he decided to play a halfling ranger with
weapon finesse and a short sword. In the adventure, he met a treant in
the forest who had dropped a magic silver acorn into a hole in the
ground that was too small for it to squeeze its arm through. He offered
to help because he was small enough to squeeze through the hole. One
Escape Artist and two Climb checks later, he was in a small cave that
had a pile of debris in one corner. He made his spot check and saw the
two dire rats sleeping in the nest, snuck up to them, and poked one with
his sword. The rats attacked, he defeated them, and when he searched
the nest he found the magic silver acorn. When he got outside again,
the treant (druid) cast cure light wounds on him and he felt better.
Hooray!

It was a fun experience. He's already clamoring for another "adventure".

:^)

- Ron ^*^

More about : son character

Anonymous
April 12, 2005 3:09:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Werebat wrote:
>
> My 4-year-old son made up his first D&D character tonight, and played
> through his first little adventure. After rolling and adding his stats
> (11, 11, 12, 12, 17, 17), he decided to play a halfling ranger with
> weapon finesse and a short sword. In the adventure, he met a treant in
> the forest who had dropped a magic silver acorn into a hole in the
> ground that was too small for it to squeeze its arm through. He offered
> to help because he was small enough to squeeze through the hole. One
> Escape Artist and two Climb checks later, he was in a small cave that
> had a pile of debris in one corner. He made his spot check and saw the
> two dire rats sleeping in the nest, snuck up to them, and poked one with
> his sword. The rats attacked, he defeated them, and when he searched
> the nest he found the magic silver acorn. When he got outside again,
> the treant (druid) cast cure light wounds on him and he felt better.
> Hooray!

WOW. Four years old? How much of the mechanical side did he handle
himself?

> It was a fun experience. He's already clamoring for another "adventure".

That's great! Way to corrupt the youth early and thoroughly!

DWS
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 3:09:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

A wonderful tale. It's kind of like the next step in reading a story;
your child gets to be the story. May I suggest you actually write up
what happened as a story and do this for every adventure. As a
birthday or Christmas present, give him a "book" of his ranger's
adventures.

Gerald Katz
Related resources
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 10:51:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

David Serhienko wrote:
> Werebat wrote:
> >
> > My 4-year-old son made up his first D&D character tonight, and
played
> > through his first little adventure.

> WOW. Four years old? How much of the mechanical side did he handle
> himself?

Very cute story. I'm interested to know the answer to David's question,
too. We have a 5-year-old who loves to make up stories, and is
extremely social. Ron's story is encouraging.

--
Jay Knioum
The Mad Afro
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 11:27:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Great job, Did your son like on particular die over the others? My
two year old son will always pick up the polyhedron die first when
presented with a set of dice.
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 1:27:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

I think I'll nab this treant adventure :-)

Have a 5 and 8 yr old, myself.

hey, here's a free tip on an emerging market for you entrepeneural
types - DnD adventures for the wee ones. Fairy-tale type adventures
(helping others) would prolly do best (and draw the least froth from
Jack Chick's mouth).

Package it with those books with the cut-outs where you (the parent)
pastes a photo of the child's head into the back page of the book (so
that each page on the right has the child's head on the appropriate
body) as a momento/ re-readable story of the adventure!

(just send me a check for 10% of the profits after you make a mint from
the idea)
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 3:39:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

alordofchaos@yahoo.com wrote:
> I think I'll nab this treant adventure :-)
>
> Have a 5 and 8 yr old, myself.
>
> hey, here's a free tip on an emerging market for you entrepeneural
> types - DnD adventures for the wee ones. Fairy-tale type adventures
> (helping others) would prolly do best (and draw the least froth from
> Jack Chick's mouth).
>
> Package it with those books with the cut-outs where you (the parent)
> pastes a photo of the child's head into the back page of the book (so
> that each page on the right has the child's head on the appropriate
> body) as a momento/ re-readable story of the adventure!

That would make for an excellent illustration book while running the
adventure, too.

"What's an owlbear, Daddy?"
"Its a big mean animal, half owl, half bear... that looks like <flip
pages> this!"
"Yay! It looks like it wants to hug me!"
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 4:25:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

ranpoirier@cox.net wrote:

> My 4-year-old son made up his first D&D character tonight, and played
> through his first little adventure. After rolling and adding his stats
> (11, 11, 12, 12, 17, 17), he decided to play a halfling ranger with
> weapon finesse and a short sword. In the adventure, he met a treant in
> the forest who had dropped a magic silver acorn into a hole in the
> ground that was too small for it to squeeze its arm through. He offered
> to help because he was small enough to squeeze through the hole. One
> Escape Artist and two Climb checks later, he was in a small cave that
> had a pile of debris in one corner. He made his spot check and saw the
> two dire rats sleeping in the nest, snuck up to them, and poked one with
> his sword. The rats attacked, he defeated them, and when he searched
> the nest he found the magic silver acorn. When he got outside again,
> the treant (druid) cast cure light wounds on him and he felt better.
> Hooray!
>
> It was a fun experience. He's already clamoring for another "adventure".
>
> :^)

Keep up the good work, Ron. :D 


--
Jasin Zujovic
jzujovic@inet.hr
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 6:08:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

David Serhienko wrote:
> alordofchaos@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>> I think I'll nab this treant adventure :-)
>>
>> Have a 5 and 8 yr old, myself.
>>
>> hey, here's a free tip on an emerging market for you entrepeneural
>> types - DnD adventures for the wee ones. Fairy-tale type adventures
>> (helping others) would prolly do best (and draw the least froth from
>> Jack Chick's mouth).
>>
>> Package it with those books with the cut-outs where you (the parent)
>> pastes a photo of the child's head into the back page of the book (so
>> that each page on the right has the child's head on the appropriate
>> body) as a momento/ re-readable story of the adventure!
>
>
> That would make for an excellent illustration book while running the
> adventure, too.
>
> "What's an owlbear, Daddy?"
> "Its a big mean animal, half owl, half bear... that looks like <flip
> pages> this!"
> "Yay! It looks like it wants to hug me!"

"You're right, son. It DOES want to hug you..."

-Tialan
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 7:31:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

David Serhienko wrote:
> Werebat wrote:
>
>>
>> My 4-year-old son made up his first D&D character tonight, and played
>> through his first little adventure. After rolling and adding his
>> stats (11, 11, 12, 12, 17, 17), he decided to play a halfling ranger
>> with weapon finesse and a short sword. In the adventure, he met a
>> treant in the forest who had dropped a magic silver acorn into a hole
>> in the ground that was too small for it to squeeze its arm through.
>> He offered to help because he was small enough to squeeze through the
>> hole. One Escape Artist and two Climb checks later, he was in a small
>> cave that had a pile of debris in one corner. He made his spot check
>> and saw the two dire rats sleeping in the nest, snuck up to them, and
>> poked one with his sword. The rats attacked, he defeated them, and
>> when he searched the nest he found the magic silver acorn. When he
>> got outside again, the treant (druid) cast cure light wounds on him
>> and he felt better. Hooray!
>
>
> WOW. Four years old? How much of the mechanical side did he handle
> himself?

Well, he'll be 5 in a few days. Still, I was really surprised, in a
way. He rolled his stats with the "4d6, drop lowest, one bonus stat,
drop lowest stat, and arrange as desired" method. Not only did he roll
four dice, remove the lowest one, and count up the remaining three, but
he also wrote the numbers himself on the scrap paper I gave him. I had
to read almost everything to him, though.

One of the reasons I did this was to steet him away from City of Heroes
(which he likes to play, but which had no educational value whatsoever).
It seems to have worked, because he was talking about it all morning.

I'm already thinking of having the treant ask him to investigate some
"strange lights" at the edge of the forest that turn out to be hostile
sheens. Although he chose "magical beasts" as his species enemy.


>> It was a fun experience. He's already clamoring for another "adventure".
>
>
> That's great! Way to corrupt the youth early and thoroughly!

Heh. Probably my favorite moment of the whole thing was him making his
first Bluff check, to trick the treant into believing he wasn't carrying
an axe when it asked him. And he rolled a 19! :^)

- Ron ^*^
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 7:37:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Murphoid wrote:

> Great job, Did your son like on particular die over the others? My
> two year old son will always pick up the polyhedron die first when
> presented with a set of dice.

He's had a bag of his own dice for a while now, with two sets of
shimmery translucent green colored dice in it. I'm not sure that he
likes any of them over the others but he thinks the 4-siders are "funny"
because they don't have numbers on top.

Mostly he used the d20, and he was usually able to add his roll to
whatever modifier I gave him at the time and give me an accurate answer,
which was good. Sometimes he used the pips on the 6-sider to help him
count (his attack bonus was +6).

- Ron ^*^
Anonymous
April 13, 2005 4:04:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Werebat <ranpoirier@cox.net> typed:

>My 4-year-old son made up his first D&D character tonight, and played
>through his first little adventure.

snip

At first, I thought - way impressive.

Then, of course...this is *Ron*. My Trollometer needs new batteries.


--
Jim or Sarah Davies, but probably Jim

D&D and Star Fleet Battles stuff on http://www.aaargh.org
Anonymous
April 13, 2005 5:03:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

David Serhienko wrote:

> That would make for an excellent illustration book while running the
> adventure, too.
>
> "What's an owlbear, Daddy?"
> "Its a big mean animal, half owl, half bear... that looks like <flip
> pages> this!"
> "Yay! It looks like it wants to hug me!"

Nice Ralph Wiggum impersonation. ;) 

-Will "They taste like burning!" Green
Anonymous
April 13, 2005 5:05:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Murphoid wrote:
> Great job, Did your son like on particular die over the others? My
> two year old son will always pick up the polyhedron die first when
> presented with a set of dice.

I dunno, I always liked the monohedral dice.

-Will "Or the polygonal ones" Green
Anonymous
April 14, 2005 5:04:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 23:09:31 -0400, Werebat wrote:

>
> My 4-year-old son made up his first D&D character tonight, and played
> through his first little adventure. After rolling and adding his stats
> (11, 11, 12, 12, 17, 17), he decided to play a halfling ranger with
> weapon finesse and a short sword. In the adventure, he met a treant in
> the forest who had dropped a magic silver acorn into a hole in the
> ground that was too small for it to squeeze its arm through. He offered
> to help because he was small enough to squeeze through the hole. One
> Escape Artist and two Climb checks later, he was in a small cave that
> had a pile of debris in one corner. He made his spot check and saw the
> two dire rats sleeping in the nest, snuck up to them, and poked one with
> his sword. The rats attacked, he defeated them, and when he searched
> the nest he found the magic silver acorn. When he got outside again,
> the treant (druid) cast cure light wounds on him and he felt better.
> Hooray!
>
> It was a fun experience. He's already clamoring for another "adventure".
>
> :^)
>
> - Ron ^*^

Nice story, thanks for sharing it.

My younger son made his first PC at age 6: an elven ranger.
A friend's daughter (age 7) made her first PC recently: an elven ranger.

Ranger seems to be a childish class...

LL
Anonymous
April 14, 2005 5:04:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 11:04:36 GMT, Lorenz Lang scrawled:

>
> Nice story, thanks for sharing it.
>
> My younger son made his first PC at age 6: an elven ranger.
> A friend's daughter (age 7) made her first PC recently: an elven ranger.
>
> Ranger seems to be a childish class...
>
> LL
>

Are they fans of Lord of the Rings? :) 

--
http://www.rexx.co.uk

To email me, visit the site.
Anonymous
April 14, 2005 5:40:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 11:13:14 +0000, Rexx Magnus wrote:

> On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 11:04:36 GMT, Lorenz Lang scrawled:
>
>>
>> Nice story, thanks for sharing it.
>>
>> My younger son made his first PC at age 6: an elven ranger.
>> A friend's daughter (age 7) made her first PC recently: an elven ranger.
>>
>> Ranger seems to be a childish class...
>>
>> LL
>>
>
> Are they fans of Lord of the Rings? :) 

I blame Orlando Blooom!

My son definitely is a fan, my friend's daughter is too I guess.
He decided to take one or some rogue levels lately to get tumble and balance
as class skills. He wants to make the cool Legolas-stunts...
Maybe I'll propose Bard as an alternative idea.

LL
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 2:46:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Lorenz Lang wrote:
> On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 11:13:14 +0000, Rexx Magnus wrote:
>
>
>>On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 11:04:36 GMT, Lorenz Lang scrawled:
>>
>>
>>>Nice story, thanks for sharing it.
>>>
>>>My younger son made his first PC at age 6: an elven ranger.
>>>A friend's daughter (age 7) made her first PC recently: an elven ranger.
>>>
>>>Ranger seems to be a childish class...
>>>
>>>LL
>>>
>>
>>Are they fans of Lord of the Rings? :) 
>
>
> I blame Orlando Blooom!
>
> My son definitely is a fan, my friend's daughter is too I guess.

I have female Black and Latina students at school who are infatuted with
Orlando Bloom and write "Legolas" on their notebooks, right next to
"Usher my Boo" and "Daddy Yankee Papi".

Heh.

- Ron ^*^
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 1:04:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

"Lorenz Lang" <lang@netlife.invalid> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.04.14.11.04.32.43773@netlife.invalid...
> Ranger seems to be a childish class...

Suffer the little children to come unto my forest
and dwell in the glades of peace and plenty.
Innocence, forthrightness and purity liken then unto the gentle bunnies and
birds of nature.
--
Pharic Urquhart - 11th Ranger
!