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Burning CD's to play in older car..late '90's model

Last response: in Windows 7
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February 2, 2013 10:59:47 PM

Time to play stump the Mods. I have spent 3 days trying to burn one doggone CD that will play in my '97 Olds Aurora. I'm 90% sure it's a Delco stock CD/tape player and I've tried all the conventional wisdom on this (I'm no amateur to ripping, converting and burning) First I burned an MP3 disc, should have known that wouldn't play, then I converted the songs from MP3 to WMA, ripped and burned it slow enough, think I went down to 4X even. Yes, I chose Audio CD. I use quality discs, the laser isn't dirty as it plays even scratched commercial discs easily, it's not copyright-protected material either. I get an error message E-20 or E-23 when I play them back. I've burned 4 coasters already, can anyone help me figure this out? I've scoured the site and the web, checked out vids, no suggestions given that I didn't already know to do. I'm using Nero 10 for the job by the way, I haven't tried Windows Media Player etc
Thanks so much gang
Wyattspoppa
a b $ Windows 7
February 2, 2013 11:15:39 PM

did you tell nero to close the cd after burning?
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a b $ Windows 7
February 2, 2013 11:20:29 PM

if you select make audio cd from nero, it should convert mp3s automatically.
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February 2, 2013 11:21:24 PM

I did, thank you for asking..seemed to burn pretty darn fast though
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a b $ Windows 7
February 2, 2013 11:29:35 PM

if using cd-rw disks used for multiple burns the cd player in the car could be having trouble readying those kind of disks. Have you tried using cd-r disks?
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February 2, 2013 11:33:20 PM

boju said:
if you select make audio cd from nero, it should convert mp3s automatically.


Thamks, but it's cool. I'd already used Xilisoft to convert the MP3's to WMA as I read older players like WMA in Audio CD format, not Data or CDRom, burned it in WMA no love..
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February 2, 2013 11:43:47 PM

I would venture to say that your disks are probably not coasters. Try them in a newer CD player. I think that the real problem is that CD player is not capable of playing CD-R's. That deck was probably designed in 93-94 time frame and CD-R's came out around that same time. I remember this being a common problem around that time and it was hit or miss whether your factory deck would play a CD-R or not. There was even discussions that you had to use specific color disks.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 2, 2013 11:56:48 PM

The files on the disk must be in CDA format, is that what you are ending up with? I used to make CD-Rs all the time and played them in car stereos from the mid 90's, but it has been quite a while, probably since the 90's!
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February 3, 2013 12:03:19 AM

I hate to say it, but iTunes actually does a pretty good job burning old school CDs (12-16 tracks, CDA format, etc). I've never had a problem playing a properly burned audio CD in any player. Maybe I'm just lucky though....
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 12:03:45 AM

wyattspoppa said:
Thamks, but it's cool. I'd already used Xilisoft to convert the MP3's to WMA as I read older players like WMA in Audio CD format, not Data or CDRom, burned it in WMA no love..


Try converting the songs back to mp3 and let nero burn as audio cd. When its in minutes instead of MB you're on the right track.

navalweapons may have a point there too, and reading around, and quote Kodaks Gold + Silver Ultima is the only CD-R I've seen that will play on *anything*! from http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/archive/index.php/t-94450....

Could give kodak a go.

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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 12:04:53 AM

i read about CDA too, must be the way to go.
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February 3, 2013 12:42:12 AM

jitpublisher said:
The files on the disk must be in CDA format, is that what you are ending up with? I used to make CD-Rs all the time and played them in car stereos from the mid 90's, but it has been quite a while, probably since the 90's!

Really good question, I just assumed when I ripped WMA that I'd end up with WMA, frankly, at this point I think trying to make a CDA disc to play might be worth trying since that was probably the native format in the mid '90's..What do you think?
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February 3, 2013 12:43:48 AM

boju said:
if using cd-rw disks used for multiple burns the cd player in the car could be having trouble readying those kind of disks. Have you tried using cd-r disks?

I never use CD-RW, only CD-R my brother. Good to check that off the list though
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February 3, 2013 12:51:54 AM

wyattspoppa said:
Really good question, I just assumed when I ripped WMA that I'd end up with WMA, frankly, at this point I think trying to make a CDA disc to play might be worth trying since that was probably the native format in the mid '90's..What do you think?


In your inital post you stated "Yes, I chose Audio CD" I assume that this statement means that when using NERO you are selecting the option to create an "Audio CD". If you selected to create an "Audio CD" NERO will automaticly convert the audio files to CDA for you, so that it would create an "Audio CD".
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February 3, 2013 1:20:57 AM

I see! Thanks. I'll try to let it doi the work from original MP3 files
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 1:21:28 AM

As numerous others have said, burn an AUDIO CD. I don't know why you'd try MP3. Or especially WMA. Those aren't the native formats and were always "extras". If it doesn't have MP3 or WMA slapped across the front of the deck it won't work.

You need the native format. You know. Like when you buy a CD from the store (I know I know what that)
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 1:59:31 PM

unksol said:
As numerous others have said, burn an AUDIO CD. I don't know why you'd try MP3. Or especially WMA. Those aren't the native formats and were always "extras". If it doesn't have MP3 or WMA slapped across the front of the deck it won't work.

You need the native format. You know. Like when you buy a CD from the store (I know I know what that)



Which is CDA (I think it stands for Compact Disc Audio without running off to search around to be sure) format.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 7:47:48 PM

I think its the same format used on normal records you buy in music shops. Nero does it automatically when choosing audio cd. Just Nero phrased it in reverse, i think.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 7:56:08 PM

Something else to consider as well is that most CD-Rs that are purchased from a store have a max burn speed of 52x. Most older players (stand-alone or car) do not play them at max burn speed. It's just like when burning a DVD, you can't burn it at 16x because most older DVD players cannot read it that fast.

There is a type of CD called "CD-R Music" that allows files to be written to them at 4x and 4x only. This allows for most older and modern CD players to play them just fine. You might try getting your hands on some of these and see if it helps.

I have older folks that come into where I work with similar situations and it all related to the burn speed used when the disc was made.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 7, 2013 10:07:46 AM

hedwar2011 said:
Something else to consider as well is that most CD-Rs that are purchased from a store have a max burn speed of 52x. Most older players (stand-alone or car) do not play them at max burn speed. It's just like when burning a DVD, you can't burn it at 16x because most older DVD players cannot read it that fast.

There is a type of CD called "CD-R Music" that allows files to be written to them at 4x and 4x only. This allows for most older and modern CD players to play them just fine. You might try getting your hands on some of these and see if it helps.

I have older folks that come into where I work with similar situations and it all related to the burn speed used when the disc was made.



Ah yes, very good point. I did not think about that. A lot of those old car stereo systems read at 2x or even only 1x. So the high burn rates would surely become an issue for them!
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a c 228 $ Windows 7
February 7, 2013 11:33:36 AM

It needs to be in the original RED BOOK format (CDA).

* RED BOOK
DISC-AT-ONCE VS TRACK-AT-ONCE

When you're buying a CD recorder it can be important to check whether it's capable of recording in Disc-At-Once mode if you want to write discs to master from, because some CD-recorders can only write using Track-At-Once mode. With Disk-At-Once recording, the whole disc is written in one pass without turning off the laser, while Track-At-Once mode only allows you to write one track at a time. When you use Track-At-Once mode, the laser will stop writing between each track, but the laser beam doesn't turn off immediately, so a couple of sectors are allocated at the end of each track which will be wasted as the laser shuts down. These are called the 'run-out' sectors and account for the fact that Track-At-Once recorders have a fixed track spacing of 2 seconds. With Disc-At-Once mode, no run-out sectors are generated between tracks, so the pause between each track can be of any length, and songs can even be run together with no gap.

Note that if you're making audio CDs to be commercially produced, the run-out sectors created in Track-At-Once mode may be considered as unrecoverable 'E32' errors when the disc is checked at the pressing plant, and the disc may be rejected as unsuitable for pressing from. This situation is changing, though. Reportedly, Doug Carson Associates, who provide glass mastering and format-transfer software to pressing plants, have solved the problem. DCA's latest software version apparently checks the TOC on the CD-R to find out where the gaps are, and whenever it finds E32 errors there (generated by the laser turning on and off between tracks) it replaces them with digital silence. So, unless you have CD-Rs with E32 errors in places other than the gaps between tracks, pressing plants using the latest DCA software will not reject CD-Rs made using Track-At-Once mode.

Red Book is the standard for Compact Disc-Digital Audio (CD-DA) and was established in 1980 as the first of the 'books' which defined the CD for audio use in domestic CD players. To identify themselves, Red Book discs usually have the familiar 'Compact Disc Digital Audio' logo printed within the label area.

The Red Book standard specifies that a compact disc can have up to 99 tracks of data, with each track containing a single audio selection. These tracks are divided into blocks of data referred to as sectors. Each sector holds 3234 bytes of data, as mentioned earlier, arranged as 2352 bytes of audio data, plus two 392-byte layers of error-detection and error-correction codes (commonly referred to as EDC/ECC), along with 98 control bytes which are often referred to as the sub-codes or sub-channels and are designated by the letters P through to W. These control bytes contain the timing information which allows the CD player to cue instantly to the beginning of each selection, display the selection's number and running time, and provide a continuous display of elapsed time.


http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan98/articles/cdformat...
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