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Should i use win 7 32bit or 64bit

Last response: in Windows 7
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February 3, 2013 10:13:44 AM

i got win 7 32 bit but not sure if i should be using win 7 64bit
i got pentium 4 3 Ghz 4gig of ram 512mb geforce 8400Gs video card
250gig harddrive

More about : win 32bit 64bit

February 3, 2013 10:17:46 AM

Well 64 bit is better for games - Windows 7 64 bit is for upgrading the ram more or less. 32 bit wouldn't recognize the ram if you put 2x4gb ram modules in the PC, 32 bit only recognizes 4gb where as 64 bit recognizes the 8gb ^
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February 3, 2013 10:23:50 AM

i heard win 7 32bit only supports like 3.5gig of ram not full 4 gig
i got 4 gig of ram so do you think i should go win 7 32bit or 64bit
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February 3, 2013 12:02:24 PM

so what systuse win 7 32bit or win 7 64 bit
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 12:05:21 PM

64
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February 3, 2013 12:15:36 PM


If you are purchasing a retail copy, go for 64-bit.

Otherwise, 32-bit should be just dandy for your current system.

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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 12:35:14 PM

64-bit is better but if you already have 32-bit then stick with it.

It's not worth $100 just to claw back 500MB or so of RAM that is being shown as unusable.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 1:57:01 PM

contrary to popular belief win 32bit will not recognize all 4 gigs of ram.

win32 has an address space for 4gb, true but this includes address space for other otherware, like video memory.

typically win32 will address between 2.7 and 3.5 gb of the system ram.

64 bit really is the only way to go.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 2:04:33 PM

neon neophyte said:
contrary to popular belief win 32bit will not recognize all 4 gigs of ram.

win32 has an address space for 4gb, true but this includes address space for other otherware, like video memory.

typically win32 will address between 2.7 and 3.5 gb of the system ram.

64 bit really is the only way to go.



Very good answer, but let me add to that last statement "64 bit really is the only way to go, if you need to be able to use more than 3.5 gig of memory, or you are installing a brand new OS on a new computer." Other than that, you won't see any difference at all. On your system, you are just fine with what you have. If you ever do any major upgrading though, I would then make the move to 64 bit.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 2:06:28 PM

with that said, it is not even an option on that cpu. that cpu only supports the 32 bit instruction set. so your only option is 32 bit.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 2:08:09 PM

You concern should be does your existing hardware have 64 bit versions of drivers? Usually there are workarounds but some hardware / peripherals will not work with 64 bit versions. Thus money spent for replacements.

Second is the software. Some software, usually from obscure or defunct manufacturers will not work in a 64 bit systems. This I can state from personal experience. And no amount of application of the "compatibility mode" will get the software to work.

So, check each hardware component for drivers and check the web for others who have had problems with running under 64 bit Windows.


^ and there you go... your hardware is NOT compliant with 64 bit
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 2:14:27 PM

Depends on which "P4 3GHz" CPU he has Neon. I'm sure there are a couple P4s that support x64.

I like Casper's answer. Considering his machine it simply isn't worth spending the money to get 64bit. (I believe the key will work on either unless he has an OEM copy...) Seeing as he already has the disk for 32, and has an older machine, I'd just do the 32bit copy. We aren't dealing with a high powered machine here that "needs" 64bit.

Edit: For anyone who doesn't remember... http://ark.intel.com/products/27479/Intel-Pentium-4-Pro... They came in both flavor, though I admit for a P4 and not a P4D the 64bit versions were not common.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 2:18:37 PM

you can download the 64 bit version of windows for free. legally.

your win32 key works on the 64bit version.

so i dont know what you mean by "spending money."

seems you are right about some having 64 bit.


SL7L4 | 3 GHz | N/A | N/A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | D0 | 1 MB | 478 pin | 32-Bit
SL7KK | 3 GHz | 530 | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | D0 | 1 MB | LGA 775 | 32-Bit
SL7Z9 | 3 GHz | 630 | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | N0 | 2 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL7PU | 3 GHz | 530J | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | E0 | 1 MB | LGA 775 | 32-Bit
SL7J6 | 3 GHz | 530 | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | D0 | 1 MB | LGA 775 | 32-Bit
SL6WU | 3 GHz | N/A | N/A | 800 MHz | 0.13 micron | D1 | 512 KB | 478 pin | 32-Bit
SL6WK | 3 GHz | N/A | N/A | 800 MHz | 0.13 micron | D1 | 512 KB | 478 pin | 32-Bit
SL7BK | 3 GHz | N/A | N/A | 800 MHz | .13 micron | M0 | 512 KB | 478 pin | 32-Bit
SL78Z | 3 GHz | N/A | N/A | 800 MHz | 0.13 micron | D1 | 512 KB | 478 pin | 32-Bit
SL94Y | 3 GHz | 631 | 05A | 800 MHz | 65 nm | B1 | 2 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL8WJ | 3 GHz | 631 | 05A | 800 MHz | 65 nm | B1 | 2 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL9CB | 3 GHz | 531 | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | G1 | 1 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL96L | 3 GHz | 631 | 05A | 800 MHz | 65 nm | C1 | 2 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL8Q7 | 3 GHz | 630 | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | R0 | 2 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL8HZ | 3 GHz | 531 | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | E0 | 1 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL82X | 3 GHz | 530J | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | E0 1 | MB | LGA 775 | 32-Bit
SL8PQ | 3 GHz | 531 | 04A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | G1 | 1 MB | LGA 775 | 32/64-Bit
SL8JZ | 3 GHz | 530 | N/A | 800 MHz | 90 nm | G1 | 1 MB | 478 pin | 32-Bit
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February 3, 2013 2:53:21 PM


casper1973 said:
64-bit is better but if you already have 32-bit then stick with it.

It's not worth $100 just to claw back 500MB or so of RAM that is being shown as unusable.


Pretty much this.

We don't know if his rig supports above 4GB, anyway, and if he has an OEM OS the OP may not (legally) transfer the OS to another motherboard.

The retail version of the OS (at double the price!) would allow the transfer to a new mobo (that is, if he removes the original installation). That's where the long-term gain of the 64-bit OS will likely be advantageous ...

despite the possible short-term aggravation of some 64-bit drivers on his current rig.




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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 3:01:52 PM

And for me its all about hassle. He already has the 32bit disk. He lacks a dual core CPU and more then 4GBs of ram. Sure he could find a place to get the 64Bit disk from and load it with his 32bit key. (unless its an OEM key.) But why bother? To gain 500MBs of ram? Load 32bit and go. Won't make much difference.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 3:03:15 PM

i'd do it for 500 more megabytes of ram, then again id do anything for slightly better performance ;p
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 3:08:40 PM

In that case any truth to the rumor that x64 is slower then x86? We use x64 because it allows more then 4GBs of ram which allows for more speed in some cases. But I remember hearing when x64 came out that because the registers are longer it takes more CPU cycles to process? Due to his older system he might be better off with 32bit. I've never checked to see so if anyone has any links I'd love to see myself.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 3, 2013 3:13:41 PM

i dont think it is any slower, though possibly faster (albeit, marginally.)

i do remember x64 using more ram though, which could negate the whole upgrading for more ram deal lol
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